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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 26, 1915 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-26

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILI,

CHINfG TO CRITICISE

the suit we make for you. Neither
the material, the style or the tail-
.g will be found the least excuse
fault finding. We solicitsan order
one of our new model suits, know-
as we do that it will give such all
und satisfaction that we will be
ur regular tailors thereafter.
g. b. WiL l COMPANY
ading Merchant Tailors State St.

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TH E MICHIGAN DAILYJ
Official newspaper at the University of
Michigan. Published every morning except
Monday during, the university year.
Entered at the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class 'matter.

meeting of students should resemble
an undertaker's convention. But once
in a while a serious thought outside
of the classroom would not be amiss;
a little wit could be well exchanged
for a bit of real intellect."

LEAVE YOUR ORDER NOW FOR

T

LOOK

LOOK

Complete

Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier or mail, $2.So. Want
ad. stations: Quarry's, Students' Supply
Store, The Delta, cor. Packard and State.
Phones: Business, 96o ; Editorial, 2414.
.Francis F. McKinniey...Managing Editor
o S. iLeonard.........Business Manager
E. Rodgers Sylvester.....Assignment 1iditor
Tem C. Reid ...............Telegraph Editor
Verne Burnett.............telegraph Editor
E. P. Wright.............. ..Sports Editor
r;dward Mack.........:Advertising Manager
Kirk White.............Publication Manager
V. R. Althseler.:,: Circulation Manager
C. V. Sellers.....Accountani
C. T. Fishleigh ..Assistant Business Manager
Night Editors
Edwin A. Hyman Joseph J. Brotherton
Rsporters
1. C. I. Parker IT. A. Fitzgerald
lconard\ \.. Nieter Martha Gray
Irwin Johnson Lee Joslyn
William F. Newton Waldo-R. Hunt
Business Staff
Albert E. horne ('ocoe Ian
George Nob 1
FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 26, 1915.
Night Editor........ Jacob M. Braude

CORNELL HEAD DECLRIS
FOR MILITARY TRAINING

Personal Christmas
Cards
Samples are more beau~tiful and artistic than ever
WAHRV'S
Univertsity Bo'okstore4

Presilenlt
fits

Schurman Tells of Bene-
Derived From System
by Students.

ya

S i

2.
SH~EEHAN'
STUDENTS' BOOKSTORE
IIp , smwm 1

DETROIT UNITED LINES
Between Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson.
Cars r un on Eansterni ti'ne, one hour faster
han local time.
Detroit Limited and Express Cars-8 :o a.
n. antd hourly to 7:10 p. n., 9 :1o p. mn.
Kalamazoo Limited Cars--8:48 a. n. and
very two hours to 6:48 p. m.; to Lansing,
:48 p. n.
Local Cars, Eastbound-5 35 a. m., 6:40 a. m.,
:05 a. m., and every two hours to 7:05 p. m,
:05 p. ni., 9 :o5 p. m.,,to0 :45 p. m.. To Ypsi-
anti only, 8 :48 a. in. (daily except Sunday),
:20 a. in., 12:05 p. m., 6:o5 p. m., 11:15 p.
n., 1 :15 a. in., r:3o a. mn.
Local Cars, Westbound-6:12 a. In., 7:50 a.
n., and every two hours to 7:50 p. m., 10:20
. in.,12 :o0a. im.

HUSTON BROSI
BILLIARDS
AN D
BOW LINGC

Candies

Cigars

Pipes

-

'I

V-

The Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Organized 1869

~11

Our "Tailor-Made" Clothes Cost No More
Than the Average "Ready-Made"
CANSLE, The Tailor
108 E. Washington St. Second Floor

Capital..... ....$ 300,000.00
Surplus .. .....$ 150,000.00
Resources over .... $3,000,000.00
Banking in all branches
Main Office, N. '. Corner Main
and Huron Sts.
Branch Office, 707 North Univ"-
ersity Avenue.

IL

CHAPMAN'S JEWELRY STORE
For Aiarn Clocks and Michigan Pins
113 SO. MAIN STREET
COME II AND TRY OUR
Chinese Comb nation Lunch
11:30 A. M5 :30 P. M.
to 1P.M.: to 7P. M.
Michigan Inn
Chop Suey

CHOP offafew
minutes and eat some of
GEOR.GE'S EY
WAI KING 1600
314 S. State St. Phone 1244-M
FIRST NATL BANK OF ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Capital $Eoo,ooo Surplus and Profit $$6s,ooo
DIRECTORS:
WIRT 9ORNWELL WALDO M. AIjsuOTT'
GEO. W. PATTERSON HARRY M. HWFxv
S. W. CLARKSON HARRISON SoULE
FRED SCH MED D. B. SUTTON
U. ) KINNIE
FORg
TO 1BISCHOFF'S HOUSE
2o Cbgpin St. Phone 8o9-M
The Farmers & Mechanics Bank
South Main Street Stat' Stroet Office
Corner Huron e S, state &t.
A 000 STRONG BANK WITH EVERY BANKING NEED

I . Liberty St.

Opp. the ArcadiaI

THE COLLEGE KIDDER.
The following appeared in "The
Cornell Daily Sun, and 'apparently is
applicable t the stdents of that in-
stituion. We can do no better than'
quote it yerbatipii
"Of the charactristics of the co-
1geinman today, the one whie' i er-
haps the most distinctly marked is
the ability and hait of "kidding," a
practice redeemed t 4gret extent
by thl training which the college
man receive iarning tp give
back a goo as he ree yog A man
wvho fins spent four years ii a
American instittin of hiher edu-
cation is usually prepared for prac-
tical jokes of every known species,
and for "kidding," clever, asinine,
subtle or painfully obvious. He is
about as easily ruffled by a jest as
a hippopotamus is put to flight with
an sigk
"The college Inhn is an 1nellft-ixl
silk-worm. About his real self, by a
process of years, he has woven a
thread of manner, of joke and jest, so
long and deep, that it is seldom that
his real friends penetgte to the man
within. -is heart is anywlere but
on his sleve, And few would have
it otherwise.
"But, growing out of such an atti-
tude towards the men with whom he
comes daily in contact, the college
nian has reached an extreme. So
long hate his daily conversation and
chats at the dinner table or in his
study been mere "kidding matches,"
that in many cases he has lost his
power to talk logicaly, consistently,
upon a topic of any nature more seri-
ous than the Chicago game or the
Varsity's chances agginst Penn. And,
if perchnee he has that power, he
is afraid to use it, knowing well that
the opening of any serious topic
means that, is the eciphnt of a
choice and assorted collection of wit.
"Picture a group of men in a fra-
ternity or boardin aoue engagod in
talking over a matter of any import-
ance. The conversation is becoming
interesting and logical. The no ore
intellectually on edg. Of a sudden
a rustling sound is heard. The house
baboon, scenting his opportunity, ut-
ters his racial noise and swings
nimbly into the conversation. mme-
diately seriousness is at an end.
The rest of the group, from force of
habit join in with that species of
comment that cn only be described
as "clever." The subject is forgot-
ten.
"Undoubtedly this results from one
or two men, college simians whose
capacity for "cleverness" is greater
than that of the undergraduates with
w'hom they come in contact; and
who cannot allow an opportunity for
the exercise of this faculty to go by
unheeded. They have a melancholy
reward. Ever, their most serious re-
narks are to be taken as a joke, it
is impossible to look upon them seri-
ously. The humor of the old circus
conversation has its touch of pathos.
'Why did Jones become a clown?'
&sks the tatooed man; 'in college he
was always the life of the party,'
answers the bearded woman,
"Such a situation which tends to-
wards the discouragement of any
serious discussion among undergrad-
uates is no small contributor to that
intellectual slovenliness which edu-
cators declare to be perhaps the par-
amount problem in American univer-
sities. The average undergraduate
reads what? His text-book on occa-
sions, the "Saturday Evening Post,"
always, and some of the monthly

That military training has been of
undeniable benefit to the students of
Cornell university and adequately pre-
pares the average young man for
military service is the assertion of
President Jacob Gould Schurman of
Cornell university in his annual re-
port to the board of trustees for 1914-
"No department," declares Prei-
dent Schurman, "Is of more practical
importance to the university, to the
undergraduates themselves, or to the
nation, than the military department.
It is gratifing to report that none is
more effective or enjoys a higher
reputation. In the inspector's report
to the war department he states in
reply to specific questions, tht the
:eneral appearance of the cadets at
inspection was excellent and that the
military instruction is of such an ex-
tent and thoroughness as to qualify
the average student for a commission
as a lieutenant of volunteer"
The reppvt futher shows that the
interest in military training at Cor-
nell continues to increase. Hither-
to the work, while open as an elec-
tive to others, has been required of
freshmen1 and last year 19000 fresh-
men were enrelled in the corps out
of a total of 1,19. This number is
likely te hOdoiutled in another year '
for at the beginning of the year 1916-
1917, sophomores shall be required to
take the same amount of military
training as is now prescribed for
freshmen.
"PREPAREDNESS FIRST"
Correspondent Believes l~itary Train-
in Will FidUold Natio' lqoer
tld -Moroe flop .1ne
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
It Is with much concern that I read
some of the articles appearing in your
paper on military training. They go
to show how little some members of
this present generation appreciate
their country, the perils, the privations
and battles that have given to us our
peace and security. Now, that condi-
tions have so changed as to cIpruand
military preparation,.s me of the sent-
iments seen, ipatrotic. To compare
military training in the present ex-
igency to college football triing, as
in your rece t article, i absurd. The
one is purely a sport, the other a duty
W9 awe our country, our homes, our
women,
It is the women who pay the long
prie of war. Military training, to
be efficient nowadays, must be com-
pulsory, so many are indifferent;
wherena a generation ago the Civil
war was fresh in our memories.
Every town had it military company
then, and the competitive drills were
as full of interest as football is now.
I was in Memphis one spring when
their "Chickasaw Guards" cleaned up
everything through the south, and the
interest was intense. Why not revive
our interest in this sort of training
among our colleges, which will be
physical training of the best sort; a
real service to our country as well as
sport,
I am convinced our country is in
real danger. Take for example what
may happen when the present war is
over. Many foreign countries have
claims on Mexico and they cannot be
met for a long time, if ever. A German
boy who worked on the farm for me
a year ago last summer had recently
come from Mexico. His father had
been killed and their farm devastated.
He and his mother had managed to
escape, he receiving a bullet in the

shoulder. The mother went back to
Germany to see about indemnity. If
war hadn't broken out in Europe they
would ha;'e m:de trouble long before
Women's Organizations-
Helen Brown, '15, general chair-
man of the Freshman spread, has ask-
ed all sophomore women to pay their
dues immediately.
All manuscripts for ,the Junior

December Records on Sale Sat. Nov. 27

pppwumm

moxam I
Am"-

All Kinds
OF
Razors
Sharpened.

On State

A

PARTICULAR LA UNDR

For the BEST in

SODAS
CANDIES
LUNCH ES

S E E

DEMONSTRATION
QUARRY
DRUG COMPANY

For
Particular
Pe opls,

Prescription Sto

re 'CITY LAUNDRY
THOS. ROWE, Prop.
Detroit Street Phone 457

IJ . tv ynit' fllustlbtS
Cor. Maynard and William Streets

-M

Ii

Successful Men
Wear Tailored Clothes and Good Clothes Are
Half The Battle
Thewe is a great difference between tailored clothes and the
other kind.
Every suit is made to fit the man-we do not force the man to
fit the suit. Just come in when you're ready.
HENRY t& COMPANYT O ILF43
North,.,1w.rsityAve. Directly North of Law ulldlng

Don't Delaty
Selecting your VICTROLA for Christmas
We will reserve it for you.

We are show-
a
ingthe 'new-
est models in

GO TO
I TUTTLE'S

:....
.,
.'
J
:o-
r.
. .. .
... - ;' . ,
. f.
x w
' .,

FALL FOOTWEAR for LADIES and GENTS
Special Agents Nettleton Shoes
WAll k' SHOE STORES
MAIN STREET STATE STREET

* TYPEWRITING
MIMEOGRAPHIMG
MULTIGR APHING
Hamilton Business College
State and Williams
APPt'O1N T (CO30ITTEE TO JIELP
OUT MCHI1CAN UNION PROJECT
To help out in the Union campaign
for the new building the following un-
derclasmen have been chosen as as-
sistants to the recording secretary:
Hary Wasson, '18, Rollin Winslow,
'18, George Ohstrom, '18, Harold
Coulter, '18, Thomas McAllister, '18,
Edward Warner, '18, Albert Horne, '18,
James Thompson, '18, Melbourne
Smallpage, '18, Charles McCarty, '18,
Paul Cholette, '19, Augustine McCor-
Drop into Reule, Conlin & Fiegel's
store for your clothes.
Students, for the most safe, speedy,
reliable economical Parcel and Mes-
senger service, call 2028. nov3tf

IKOLLAUF - THIE - TAILORf
DRESS SUITS A SPECIALTY
Main Entrance of Old P. O. Building
MAIN AND ANN STS.
mack, '19, Walter Payne, '19, William
Craig, '19, T. L. Baitman, '19, Henry
Thompson, '19, Paul Strawhecker, '19,
Charles Clark, '19, Hugh MacMillan,
'19, Ernest Maurer, '19, Thomas Taylor,
'19, Henry Caulkins, '19, Rufus Knight,
'19, Henry Hoch, '19. These men have
been choosen to encourage interest for
the work among underclassmen.
Martin guitars, mandolins, ukeleles
and all musical instruments at Schae-
berle & Son's Music House, 110 South
Main street. oct8tf
CLOTHING
from the hIoue of Kuppenheimer on
sale by N. F. Allen & Co., Main
street. wed-eoa
2255 2255 2255 2255

p.
this. There are thousands of such
cases waiting to be settled.
With these as a pretext an army will
be landed in Mexico and while we are
debating what to do about it, our
Monroe Doctrine must either go by
the board oriwithin a few weeks our
principal cities will be under heavy
ransom. We will then pay for this
war. To allow this great rich coun-
try to lie unprotected, a prize, is in-
sanity. Let this be our slogan :
"First Line Preparedness."
FRANK G. HAYNES.
PORTO RICAN MEMBERS HAVE
CHARGE OF SUNDAY'S PROGRAM
Porto Rican members of the Cosmo-
politan club will have charge of the
program of the club meeting Sunday.
The meeting will be held in the Unit-
tarian church at 3:00 o'clock in the
afternoon. Jose M. Hernandez, assist-
ant in the Spanish department, will
speak on the customs and manners of
Porto Rico, and Carlos Zanelli, '19E,
of the school of music, will sing a
tenor solo.
This is the first of a series of na-
tional programs which the club plans
to give this winter. Chinese, Armen-
ian, Japanese, and other programs will
be rendered later on.
Rabbi Simon Delivers Sermon Sunday
" Rabbi Abram Simon, of Washing-
ton,D.C., a professor in Johns Hop-
kins University, will be the speaker1
at the meeting of the Jewish Students';
Congregation in Newberry hall at'
6:45 o'clock Sunday night.
Rabbi Simon delivered a course of
three lectures at the last summer ses-
sion of the university on "The History
of Jewish Education."
Just glance over that Reule, Con-
lin & Fiegel ad, and then come into
the store and look over the suits.
uov3-7-12-17-21

PROF. R. W. AIGLER TO SPEAK
AT FRESH LAW SMOKER MONDAY
The first "real mixer" of the year
Will be held by the 1918 law class at
the Michigan Union, Monday even-
ing, November 29. Amusements, eats,
smokes and drinks will be in evidence
and talks will be given by Prof. R. W.
Aigler, of the law department, J. E.
Ryan, '18L, and E. O. Smith, '18L.
William E. Mathews, president of
the fresh law class has picked the fol-
lowing committees for the present
year: Social committee: Chairman
R. M. Allen, G. M. Coulter, W. C. Allen,
W. C. Allee, D. A. Finkbeiner,; Fin-
ancial committee: Chairman R. A.
Allen, L. E. Burke, J. W. Thomas; Ad-
visory committee: Chairman F. S.
Baer, A. J. Hutton, J. E. Ryan, G. D.
Clapperton, C. H. Heath,, H. B. Cob-
lentz.
"HAL" SMITH TAKES LEAD FROM
"MAULLIE" IN GROTTO CONTEST
The popularity contest being con-
ducted by the Zal-Gaz Grotto circus
sprang a surprise yesterday after-
noon, when "Hal" Smith,'16, again
took the lead from "Maullie", and
forged ahead with a lead of 254 votes.
"Joe" Ufer, who headed the list for
several days, has dropped back to
fourth place.
The standing of the first five men
is as follows: "Hal" Smitb, 1,629;
John Maulbetsch, 1,375; Harry Park-
er, 1,230; "Joe" Ufer, 1,175; L. W.
Lisle, 1,172.

OVERCOATS
and rain coats from the House
Kuppenheimer, on sale by N. F. All
Co., Main street. oct6eod-w
Learn the new fox trot at t
Packard Academy. Nov. 20

magazines. The remainder cf hi play must be in the hands of Mar-
reading course usually retails as jorie Delevan, '15, before noon to-
$1.08 per volume. day. All plays must be typewritten
"No one would ask that the dinner and signed by a pseudonem.

_ aruVer L+NVU ,GiLlsl el 1a f. i!'t3

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