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November 25, 1915 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T.HJR MICAl xAf4 DAILI

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JOHN MULBETSCH
ELECTED -CAPTAI N
F181_ARSiTY
(Continued from Page 1)
currence was rare, however, and any
man nailing the "Bullet" before he
had plunged through for at least a
first down was tendered an ovation,
similar to those which baseball play-
ers used to g't hen thzy rn-ote a
long, lusty ball off George Sisler.
Last year he was installed in the
line-up as a regular some seven or
eight seconds after he reported to
Coach Yost in September, and he has
been performir there ever since and
"providing the highest sort of enter-
tainment" as the, theatrical ' press
agents are wont to say.
Last year Walter Camp selected
Maulbetsch for his All-American team,
as did the vast majority of the critics
throughout the country. "Maullie's"
offensive performances have not been.
quite as spectacular and showy this
season, as 'he has been upon a losing
team, and one that has not given him
quite the support and assistance that
is required for his boring line plung-
es. His defensive work has been high-
class throughout the season and even
better than his record- of last year in
this respect.
Maulbetsch was the lightest regul-
ar on the Varsity squad this season,
which alone is almost conclusive proof
that a mere matter of weght does not
make a football player.
Maulbetsch is an Ann Arbor boy and
before his entrance into Michigan, he1
was the star of the local high school.'
P. S.-One more or less pertinent
fact has almost been omitted. Mr.
Maulbetsch plays left half back.

lIORWE, IN WRESTLING GROUP
According to Mr. O. S. Westerman,
instructor of boxing and wrestling at
the Waterman gymnasium, the "dark
horse" of wrestling circles has been
unearthed in the person of Vasil P.
Moisides, '17 Med.
Moisides is one of the strongest
men in college and gives promise of
being the best of the heavyweight
wrestlers this year. He has an abun-
dance of natural ability which, coupled
with his eagerness to learn the game,
will make him a formidable candi-
date for the heavyweight title. With
the assistance of Mr. Westerman's
coaching Moisides should develop
into one of the best wrestlers at
Michigan.
Mr. -Westerman's find has had much
athletic experience before he came to
the university. In Asiatic Turkey,
his home, Moisides carried off the
trophy for the discus throw on one
occasion.
MCLa iighiu - Johnson Cross Ra quets
Los Angeles, Nov. 23-Dope on the
number one man in the United States
tennis ranking should be cleared up
to some extent when McLaughlin and
Johnston meet the day after tomor-
row in the "round robin" tournament
now in progress at Long Beach. John-
ston has already beaten McLaughlin,
but the critics are in doubt, on account
of the fact that some unknowns have
easily beaten the national champion,
as to whether Johnston was not play-
ing beyond his gaie at the time.
Montana Club Elects New Officers
At a meeting of the Montana club
held last night, a constitution was
adopted and the following officers
elected: President, L. F. Dahling,
'17.L; vice-president, W. E. Talcott,
'16L; secretary, F. Stanley Sell, '18;
treasurer, Gordon McPherson, 'ISM.
A committee was appointed to ar-
range for a Christmas dinner to be
held the Saturday before vacation.

TWO CLASS AMES TO
BE PLAYEDTOMORROIN
Senior Laws Meet Senior Lits, While
Soph Lits Play Senior
Engineers
Two games are scheduled for tomor-
row afternoon in the inter-class foot-
ball league. The senior laws meet
the senior lits for the second time dur-
ing the season, this game deciding
which team will receive the second
set of numerals, and the soph lits play
the senior engineers for the fourth
set. Both games are between pretty
evenly matched teams and should af-
ford some good football.
In the game for the second set of
numerals awarded by the Athletic as-
sociation, the contesting teams have
met before and consequently know
considerable regarding the tactics of
their opponents. The first game be-
tween these two aggregations result-
ed in the defeat of the lits by the score
of 7-0, a lateral pass netting the
counter for the barristers. However,
the game was probably the hardest
fought fracas of the inter-class race
for campus honors and the battle to-
morrow should be even better by vir-
tue of former experience.
A close game is expected as the re-
sult of the soph lit-senior engineer
clash. The sophs have fought their
way up to first place in the second
division and have played some of the
best teams out on south Ferry Field,
and with all of their experience and
the incentive coming from the fact
that this will be their last chance to
win numerals, they are doped to put
tip the stiffest kind of competition.
The senior engineers are forced to win
in order to make their numerals and
avoid the disgrace of losing to a second
division team, and according to dope
the game will be a hard tussle.
Senior Lits to inet Records Verified
Post cards of verification of the
records of the seniors in the literary
college, will be sent out from the
offce of the registrar soon after De-
.tmber 1st.
The custom maintained in the past
of having all seniors report at the
office will thus be partially done away
with, as only those persons will need
to report whose records are not clear
or who hold that the office record does
not correspond with their own records
as they have it.
JUNIOR ENGINEERS TO HOLD
SMOKER AT UNION TOMORROW
A smoker will be held by the junior
engineers tomorrow evening, Friday,
the 25th, at the Union. Eats and plenty
of material for manufacturing a good
haze will be on tap and talks by Pro-
fessor Parker anr Professor Ware of
the Electrical and Chemical Engineer-
ing departments respectively, will pro-
vide the evening's entertainment.

AFTER DINNER MAESTIC
Matinee at 3 Night at 7:30 and 9
VAUDEVILLE AND PIONEER, AND PARAMONT SCHOOL-DAY COMEDY
T H E G US ED W A]RD S
ORIGINAL
ANND CHOOL BOYS & GIRLSI,
clever youngster Funsters in a tabloid comedy reminiscent of your own 4
happy school room days-more fun thani a circus-you will laugh your-
self sick and well again.

Th Dainty Comedienne
VIOLET MacMILLAN
The Cinderella of Vaudeville

Here is where you laugh
CORR, ADMORE & CARR
"The Trampoline Special"

prflw-rnnrasamrnWtaWWsflLeuwPSWs

NE WHOFF & PHELPS Vaudevilles Premier Artist
in Singing, Dancing lid Talking KING SAUL
"In Cre of General Delivery" Spectacular Oil Painting Novelty
Phone 1701 and Get Seats in Advance,



THE DAILY SPORTOSCOPE,

Judging solely from the "won and
lost" column, Michigan, Pennsylvania
and Yale will have to record the 1915
football season as .a disastrous year,
It is interesting to note that Michigan
is the only one of these three insti-
tutions that has retained her coach
for next season.]
A veritable broadside was fired at1
poor Brooks down at Pennsylvania,
and he was forced to retire in con-
fusion under abusive criticism,
Brooks became unpopular over a year
ago when his 1914 aggregation was
merely used as a stepping stone by
many of Pennsylvania's opponents.
Hinkey's rather ignominious exit
from New Haven was attended by cir-
cumstances somewhat similar to those
in the Brooks' case. The climax was
reached when triumphant Harvard]
marched up and down the field majest-
;ially, almost unhinderred by the weak,
hair line resistance that the collection
of alleged Yale football players offer-
ed. Yale had been defeated several
times before earlier in the season, but
the climax was not reached until the
final battle of the year.
Thus Coache Yost occupies the dis-
tinction of being the only coach of the
three who have had charge of these
unsuccessful elevens, who has. been
retained. This is rather significant
and indicative of the value placed upon
him by the Michigan authoritives.
Early reports are to the effect that
Yost's assistant coaches may not be
back, as some of them are seeking pos-
itions in which they will be given full
authority, if rumors are to be accredit-
ed.
Coaches must be successful. This
same trait is true in other lines, how-
ever. The two deposed coaches are
perhaps not too blame, but "all the
world loves a winner," and of late it

has almost become a question of "win
or get out."
The Oregon Aggies have invited M.
A. C. to come out beyond the Rocky
mountains for a game next season.
This speaks well for the westerner's
hospitality, but with the lingering
memories of what these western youths
did in Lansing last fall, there is a
strong suspicion in many quarters
that the 1916 M. A. C. football squad
will "decline with thanks."
Cornell and Pennsylvania meet *to-
day in their annual game. Of course,
on paper the result'is merely a ques-
tion of the size of the score that Cor-
nell accumulates, as none of the most
ardent Penn. supporters even dare to
hope for a victory. There may be a
team in America that can defeat Cor-
nell, but then again the sun may move
around the earth.
BlIEF BITS OF SPORT GOSSIP.
At a meeting held early this week,
Ralph Henning was elected captain
of the 1916 Michigan Agricul-
tural College football team. Henning
played right end during the past sea-
son.
Brown University has decided the
summer baseball question in. the fol-
lowing rather elastic terms: "Any
Brown man may play summer base-
ball and still remain an amateur,
provided his team is in no league in
recognized professional standing."
Rifle club members of the Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania who make a to-
tal score of 550 points per week will
be given gymnasium credit in that
institution.

NEW SPORT, INDOOR BASEBALL,
REPORTED WELL UNDER WAY
Classes Intending to Put Out Team
Urgeil to Hold Meeting and
Plan for Practice.
A new sport is getting under way,
the same being indoor baseball which
will form another branch of intra-
mural activities. Intramural Director
Rowe is taking a keen interest in
the game and expects it to prove a
great success this winter.
Already several classes have en-
tered the league, which will inaugur-
ate the latest interclass activity on
the campus this season. Arrange-
ments are being made to have a net
stretched over the rafters in Water-
man gymnasium so that flies will not
become entangled in the steel gird-
ers during a game. The diamond
will be laid out with tape mn the near
future, probably some time this week.
Meanwhile it is desired that all
classes intending to put out a team,
hold a meeting to get a line on ma-
terial and to set a time for practice
so that a regular practice schedule
may be mapped out by the intramural
office. It is likely that practice will
have to be held at night as otherwise
it would interfere with gymnasium
classes and as there will be only one
diamond, periods for workouts must
necessarily be arranged so that con-
flicts will be avoided.
Manager Nieter, of the J-lits, has
called a meeting of men in his class
for Friday afternoon at 4:00 o'clock
in Waterman gym. All men who have
had experience in the game are es-
pecially urged to be at this meeting.
Wright's Saxophone Trio Makes Debut
Wright's Saxophone Trio will make
their first appearance in Ann Arbor
this year on December 3, when they
will play for a dance to be held at the
Michigan Union. Tickets may be ob-
tained by phoning 236.

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John Manlbetsch, )ichigan's Football Captain.

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Ptronize

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