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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 23, 1915 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-11-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILI

NOTHING TO CRITICISE

he suit we make for you. Neither
he material, the style or the tail-
ig will be found the least excuse
fault finding.We solicitsan order
one of our new model suits, know-
as we do that it will give such all
nd satisfaction that we will be
r regular tailors thereafter.
G. H. WILD COMPANY
ding Merchant Tailors State St.

', ;
-,z
I'

LOOK- LOOKI

Complete

Gym

Suit

$200

SHH
STUDENTS' BOOKSTORE

DETROIT UNITED LINES
tween Detroit, Ann Arbor and Jackson.
rs run on Eastern time, one hour faster
local time.
troit Limited and Express Cars--8::o a.
nd hourly to 7:10 p. mi., 9:ro p. m.
lamazoo Limited Cars-8:48 a. M. and
y two hors to 6:48 p. in.; to Lansing,
p. m.
cal Cars, Eastbound-5:35 a. m., 6:40 a. m.,
a. m., and every two hours to 7:05 p. m.,
p. m., 9:05 p. m., 10:45 p. in. To Ypsi-
only, 8:48 a. m. (daily except Sunday),
a. mn., 12:05 p. in., 6:o5 p. in., i : r5 p.
:15 a. m., 1:30 a. M.
cal Cars, Westbound-6:r2 a. m., 7:so a.
md every two hours to 7:50 p. m., 10:20
1., 2:20 a. M.
the Ann Arbor Savings Bank
Organized 1869
Japihal ............$ 300,000.00
Surplus ..........$ 150,000.00
Resources over .'....$3,000,000.00
Banking in all branches
lain Office, N. W. Corner Main
and Huron Ms.
Branch Office, 707 North Univ-
ersity Avenue.

HUSTON BROS.
.ILLIARDS
AND
BOWLING

Candies

Cigars

Pipes

r_-

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Official newspaper at the University of
Michigan. Published every morning except
Monday during the university year.
Enteredaat the post-office at Ann Arbor as
second-class matter.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building. Sub-
scriptions: by carrier or mail, $2.5o. Want
ad. stations: Quarry's, Students Supply
Store, The Delta, cor. Packard and State.
Phones: Business, 960; Editorial, 2414.
Francis F. McKinney.. Managing Editor
John S. Leonard..........PBusiness Manager
E. Rodgers Sylvester.i....Agnent Editor
TomnC. Reid..............Telegraphts Editor
Verne Burnett..... ,....... Telegraph Editor
. P. Wrighth.................Sports Editor
Edward Mack..........Avertising Manager
Kirk White.........Publication Manager
Y. R. Altselerw Circulation Manager
C. V. Sellers....................ccountan
C. T. Fishleigh . .AssistantBusiness Manager
Night Editors
Edwin A. Hyman Joseph J. Brotherton
Reporters
f. C. B. Parker B . A. Fitzgerald
Leonard W. Nieter Martha Gray
Irwin Johnsonc Lee eJoslyn
Willianmi F. Newton WiAldo R. A unt
Business Staff
Albert E.s1Hgorne Roscoe Rau
George Nobis
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1915.
Night Editor
Nat Thompson
A STRAW BALLOT.
The Daily is being deluged with
communications concerning the pro-
posed military training. At nearly
every student meeting the same p rob-
lem is taken up, and in the majority of
cases it seems as though the main
point in issue is being overlooked.
The board of regents will meet
Wednesday, December 1, to consider
the resolution sent up to them by the
faculty. The point that they must de-
cide is really the one that interests us
at the present, and this is whether or
not it is advisable to install military
training in the University, and not as
to how the system is to be worked out.
We are prone now to consider the ways
and means of applying the system, but
this is a question to be reserved for a
later stage.
If the regents can be convinced that
compulsory training is a thing that
should be provided for Michigan stud-
ents, then they cannot alowa them-
selves to be held back because the
ways and means of treating the prb-
lem do not readily present themselves.
If, on the other hand, they are satis-
fied that- Michigan does not want com-
pulsory training, then a simple way
out of the situation is seen.
To help the regents ascertain the
opinion of the undergraduates onthis
one point it is planned to take a straw
ballot the latter part of next week,
putting before the voters the one i-
sue outlined above.
CRAFTSMtEN CLUB INITIATES
NEW MEN AT RECENT MEETING
Twelve members were initiated in-
to the Craftsmen club at the meeting
of the organization Saturday night.
Rev. Courtland Miller gave an inter-
esting address. A musical program
was furnished by Howard Finste-
maker and Melville F. Smith.
Paul E. Gibson was elected to the
office of 1st vice-president. John G.
Mead, '17P, was appointed in charge
of the Craftsmen team, filling the
vacancy caused by the resignation of
Harold A. Mills.
An informal meeting will be held
Saturday night.

TREASON OR MILITAISM ?
CORRESPONDENT HAS DIFFERENT
CONCEPTION OF DUTY TO THE
STATE.
Editor The Michigan Daily:-
In The Daily of Nov. 20, Mr. Thei:s
took occasion to remark that those o
us who oppose military training at
Michigan and the imposition of a gen-
eral military system in this country
are traitors, men without a country,
and guilty of high treason.
Indeed! High sounding words those
and worthy of analysis.
Few will deny that the individual
owes a duty to the state, but as to
what constitutes that duty there are
differences of opinion, and because I do
not believe a man's first duty to his
state is military service, is absolutely
no reason why I am to be branded as
a traitor. There are men in this Uni-
versity who are fitting themselves to
serve the state in the larger sense; for
the battles of peace are always greater
than those of war. Who will say that
? the student who is preparing to be-
come an engineer, a doctor, a lawyer,
or fitting himself in a general way for
service to mankind is not preparing
to render a greater service to his state
than the West Point man? The latter
is chiefly taught, as a future militarist
the destruction of life and how to
bring about destruction in the most
scientific manner while the former will
devote his energies to constructive
service.
Again, we are called unpatriotic, and
Professor Hobbs at Wednesday night's
meeting of the Forum said he was
ashamed of the un-American spirit
shown by the speakers who spoke
against military training; but it seems
to me that Professor Hobbs and those
who support him are the ones who are
guilty of trying to impose something
un-American, for a military system
ever has been an American ideal, Such
system it is generally admitted had its
roots in Europe; therefore who is
guilty of un-Americanism?
As to patriotism, after all what is
patriotism? I deem it to be love of
one's country and the true patriot must
have a sincere desire for his country's
welfare. _Consequently I cannot see
why in order to be regarded as a pa-
triot a man must be in favor of pre-
paring for that which he professes
to be against.
Big armaments are not built for
peace, they are built for war. You us-
ually get what you g after. When a
man sows wheat he does not harvest a
crop of corn from that field. If you
sow the seeds of peace you get peace;
if you sow the seeds of war you get
war. Tae your choice.
Who is the greater patriot in Ger-
many today, von Hindenburg or Lieb-
necht, Kitchener or Bernard Shaw in
England, Roosevelt or Jane Addams
in the United States? The question an-
swers itself when we remember that
a real patriot desires the welfare of
his country, and since war can never
benefit a state but is always a detri-
ment, even to the nation that wins, it
logically follows that the warriors
are not the real patriots.
Therefore Mr. Theiss is laboring un-
der a delusion when he says that those
who oppose war or preparedness
which leads to war are unpatriotic.
And neither he nor anyone else can
have any foundation in fact for the1
theory that the United States has no
place for the peace loving man or
woman. On the contrary the people of
this country have no use for the mili-

J

JUST R ECEIVED1
The Principles of
DYNAMO ELECTRIC MACHINERY
By PROF. B. F. BAILEY
WAH I'S
knoin 'a lot of th D_
13 being share of what L, Jj k
Know VELVET, an' youd b
on your tobacco wiso1.
E
fa
TH ANKSCIVING FLOWERS
Table Baskets from 75c to $10.00. Chrysanthemms in .a ae
colors and sizes.* Carnations all colors. Corsages, Roses eli e
of the Valley.
For those who are prevented from being at the family feast there af uhtt
sentiment expressed by flowers telegraphed and delivered T'hank~riAug a ni
no matter if the dinner table be thousands of miles away.
Orders left with me now will be forwarded to the local florist by mail, thus sr
telegraph tolls.
MRS. FLANDERS Flower S,."
PhSne 294 2 3 EAST LIsERTSTREE

I

We
FULL

Have a
LINE 'OF

I

Cut Flowers and Plants
For All Occasions

COUSINS & HALL
1002 S. UNIVERSITY AVE.
Phone 115

Aui~daA .Bank

TYPEWRITERS

)rner Liberty and Main
>al Coke Lumber
Planing Mill Specialties
Interior Finishing
JN O J. SAUER
ne 2484 310 W. Liberty

TYPEWRITING AND
SHORTHAND
MIMEOGRAPHING
,',Eerything for the Typek'i er"
0. D. MORRILL
(-'r altin're L'nch)
.: 322 S. State St.

I

A Complet. Lino of
Drug Sundries, Rodek&
Candies, Perfumes
ALBER.T MANN, Dru~gist
215 South MMhn St. Ann Ar ,r. Mch
Genuine Gas Coke is-
Almost Ashless
It contains a smaller percent of waste than
any fuel on the market.
Therefore it is the most efficient.
Direct from the maker to you with no
middleman's profits.

INDIVIDUALITY
Characterizes each garment produced this season,
The cut weave and finish are just right in each
case.
We shall be glad to offer suggestions.
D. E. GRENNAN
MENS'S FINE CUSTOM TAILORING 606 LIBERTY STREET, EAST
Department Paper and Envelopes
All Departments
LOOSE LEAF PAPER "Any Size"
FOUNTAIN PENS SOLD AND REPAIRED
I. F. SCHLEEDE 340 S. State

Wash tenaw Gas Co.

U. I

SAM BURCHFIELD &

CO.

The FIRST and BEST Tailoring
Establishment in Ann Arbor.
ANNOUNCE
We have an exceptionally fine and varied
line of Wooler- to show you this Fall.

.,
.V
I

tarist; but we will not make him move
to Mars but will simply draw the poi-k'
son from his fangs and make hima s
harmless.__
It was that greatAmerican, Bena- Dea Myra B. Jordantd Mrs. John
min Franklin, who said, "There never Da yaB od T',r
was a bad peace or a good war.h Effinger will be at h,, to umversity
ANTI-MILITARIST. j1women this afternc:so ; m 4:OQ to
6:00 o'clock.
Latin Play Tryouts to Be Tomorrow. ' The hygiene le;- which was
Tryouts for the Latin Play will be scheduled for 5:00 o e ' tonormw
held at 4:00 o'clock on Wednesday, afternoon has been postponed until
next week.
November 24, in room 103 University omega Phi, honorary rhetoric and
hall. They will be open to the mem- sociology society, has elected the fol-
bers of the Classical Club, and all lowing women: Katherine Harrington,
students in the University who are tak- '18; Marion Wilson, '18; Marion Hold-
ing Latin this semester. en, Golda Ginsburg, '17; Miriam Hub-
bard, '16; Donna Sullivan, '16; Nellie
Rosewarne, '16, and Jeanette Arm-
strong, 17. Intiation will be held De-
o cember 1 at 4:30 o'clock at the Kapp4
Kappa Gamma house.
FACULTY MEMBERS WILL GO TO
SECURITY LEAGUE CONVENTION
STRAND.
Professors William H. Hobbs, John
W. Bradshaw, S. Lawrence Bigelow,
Arthur G. Hall, and C. B. G. de Nan-
crede will go to Chicago, Saturday to
ft &represent the Ann Arbor branch of the

SAM BURCHFIELD & CO.

w

ith
Rubber Heels attached to your
shoes, they relieve the jar caused by
leather heels and assist in performing
the same function that, the natural heel
cushion performs when walfing bare.

TYPEWRITING
MIMEOGRAPHIMG
MULTIGRAPHING
Hamilton Business College
State and Williams

Students, for the most safe, speedy,
reliable economical Parcel and Mes-
senger service, call 2028. nov3tf

Pianos to rent. Prices and pianos
right, at Schaeberle & Son's Music
If there is one thing on earth which House, 110 South Main street. oct8tf
we would rather do. than anything else
on earth, it is to get you there when
you are in a hurry. Stark, 2255. We aim to give the best service on
novl6tf Victrola Records. Call us up for
prompt delivery. Grinnell Bros'. Mus-
Thanksgiving Dinner, Whitney. ic House. 166 South Main St. Phone
Hotel. 12-2 P. M., 75c. nov.23-24-25 1707.

N? ''5 BY VPAM
N° .505 BLK. N4 605 TAN

footed.

National Security League at a na-
tional convention in that city.
They will also attend a monster
mass meeting to be held in the Coli-
seum, Sunday.

Once worn, no cornfor

S
f
!
1
;
w.....- - --_._....,m....- _.. _ ____.._..
__-- -

.

OMNI I I

n 3 :.

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