100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 07, 1915 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

T BE MICHIGAN DAILY

L..b

lE

IIII

HIGHEST
Iie ivell-dreessed young man bvalks with his chest
thrown out and his chin up; feeling his superiority without
thinking it.
And remember this: to be well dressed is not to

0.-

Mi be foppish or dandyfied. The really well-dressed

(,1

young man is attired in good taste.
It is for men who want to

buy Clothes

of

Character and Good Taste that this shop is conducted.
If there was ever a spring season when we were
better equipped to serve your apparel needs than now
we have no record of it--for here you will find the
new. shirts, hosiery, neck-wear, hats, and incidentals
to a man dress in such variety that your personal
taste is bound to be met.

r
ti
o;
T
A.
S
C:
a
e,
t(
h

I
i
K

'Y
i
Q ' +
. .'
l,'
'
ifi
{t{
i MMM
4
A

I

It is a good thing to "drop in"' once
only to keep posted on style.

in while if

,r
i'

i

I

BAUMGARTNER'S
YOUNG MEN'S SHOP
GRAND RIVER AVENUE
AT
WASHINGTON BLVD.
DETROIT

P t
j

during the recent football season. In
answering the criticism of Williams
rooters in the Princeton Alumni News,
the Williams Record said: "Innocent
intentions are all very well, but they
do not weigh heavily with the damage
dispensers when the street car runsc
over the street cleaner. Williams menc
have not fully acquitted themselvess
when they have merely avoided muck-e
erism. It is highly essential that theyt
also avoid any appearance of muck-o
erism."1
One of the most courageous stands
on a question of college politics was
taken by the Cornell Sun in November,I
on the matter of freshman elections.
Machine politics with a boss at the
throttle was suggested in several let-
ters to the editor. "As an election, theE
freshman balloting yesterday was a
pitiful farce," said the editor, afterl
making his investigation. "As a Uni-t
versity proceeding it was a crimsont
disgrace. Political manoeuvering andt
bartering for office in class elections
have this fall reached the lowestt
depths of rottenness. * * *" Strong
words like these follow in a columnt
eprimand to the freshman officers who
denied all the charges in the next9
issue of the Sun.
"Everyone must admit that the
tendency is toward a more wholesome
way of regarding retarding habits,"
says The Michigan Daily, in commend-
ing the action of a group of leading
athletes who united to discourage un-
cleanliness among the men who rep-
resent Michigan in college sports.
Of all the college newspapers ex-
amined in this brief survey, the Uni-
versity Daily Kansan, alone, has a
motto above its editorial column This
motto is:F
"The Daily Kansan aims to picture
the undergraduate life of the Univer-
sity; to go further than merely print-
ing the news by standing for the ideals
the University holds; to play no favo-
rites; to be clean; to be cheerful; to
be charitable; to be courageous; to
leave more serious problems to wiser
heads; in all, to serve to the best of
its ability the students of the Unver-
sity."
The college editor who follows out
this program in letter and in spirit
will not go far astray. He will be
writing a bold answer to the pertinent
question: "What is the matter with

HERE'S A CHANCE TO GO TO
FRISCO WITH MICHIGAN MEN

1
i
i

Advanced students of the piano, vo-
al and violin departments of the uni-
ersity school of music will appear In
the following program at the school
f music, at 4:15 o'clock today:
'rio, C minor, Op. 1, No. 3 ..Beethoven
(First Movement)
Altha Heffelbower, Piano; Thelma
Newell, Violin; Wihtred
Cook, 'Cello.
Sonata, No. 7 ................Mozart
Patricia Ferguson
Wandrer's Nachtlied........Schubert
Wohin ........--.......Schubert
Hannah G. Cochrane
Adagio from Op. 27, No. 2 . Beethoven
Helen Derfus
Dio Possente ...............Gounod
Chase B. Sikes
Sonata, Op. 31; No. 2......Beethoven
Allegro-Adagio-Allegretto
Louise Rowlands
ANOTHER MYSTERY SOLVED
BY DAILY'S SLEUTH SERVICE
At least one doctor's thesis has
caused some little amount of curiosity
and worry on the part of campus ped-
estrians, especially those who manage
to pass the south wing of University
hall about midnight. Several persons
have noticed a light burning there all
night, and wondered who the enthus-
astic gentleman was, that had the
physical energy to work through the
long hours of. the night.
Wright A. Gardner, grad, is respon-
sible or rather guilty for this impres-
sion. Mr. Gardner is performing an
experiment, which is to show the ne-
cessity of light in the germination of
seeds. In order to perform this exper-
iment he must have two lights burning
4 hours each day. Of course, he
doesn't work there all night. The mys-
tery has dissolved into thin air.
PEOPLE OF MONROE WILL VISIT
ANN ARBOR EN MASSE MAY 20
More than 1,000 prominent men and
women from Monroe will journey to
Ann Arbor on May 20 to become the
guests of the Ann Arbor Civic asso-
ciation and the university authorities
for the day. The occasion is the open-
ing of a "boosting" campaign by the
city and university officials.
Hundreds of motor cars have been
requisitioned for the transporting of
the guests to the city, and elaborate
plans are now under way for various
entertainments. The Monroe citizens
will be present at the May Festival
concert in Hill auditorium in the
evening.
A committee consisting of Secretary
Shirley Smith, of the university, Chris.
Donnelly and Sam Heusel, leading
merchants, and B. H. Rawls, secretary
of the Ann Arbor Civic association has
been appointed to make arrangements
for the affair.
The guests are expected to arrive in
the city about 11:00 o'clock Thursday
morning, May 20, remaining until after
the May Festival concert at night.
JUNIOR ENGINEERS AND LITS
HOLD COMBINED DANCE MAY 14
Junior lits and junior engineers will
hold a combined dance Friday May 14
at the Union. The social committees
of the two classes will meet within a
few days to make arrangements for
the affair, and a program of special
music and feature dances will be plan-
ned at that time.
Will Take Pictures Until End of Week
Individual photographs for the group

picture of the senior engineering class
may still be taken until Saturday night.
After that time the prints will be made
ready, and the big picture will be put
together. About 210 individual photo-
graphs, out of a total class member-
ship of 225, have been taken and
printed.
Heating Tunnel Excavation Progresses
Excavation for the heating tunnel,
which is to connect the new Martha
Cook dormitory with. the university
heating plant, is progressing rapidly.
The tunnel, when completed, will be
about 600 feet in length, and will car-
ry the heating pipes and the electric
lighting leads to the new- building.
To Help Make Speed Test of New Ship
Prof. H. C. Sadler, of the naval en-
gineering department, went to Port
Huron yesterday to assist today at the
speed trials of the "Huronic," a new-
ly built lake steamer.

You may speak words of praise con-
cerning good times to be had on Glee
club trips, football specials, engineer
spring vacation tours, home specials
and even Union opera journeys, but
when that "Wolverine Special" puffs
out of Chicago on August 11, gloriously
bedecked with maize and blue, from
25 to 50 Michigan men are going to
start on a trip to the Panama-Pacific
International exposition that will make
all other sorts of journeys seem like
a ride to Wayne on the D. U. R.
In the words of the poet who collid-
ed with the clothes line at night, it's
going to be "some trip"-that is, it.will.
be, if everything works out according
to plans and specifications. And here's
the point, it's a safe bet that every-
thing will work right because the tour
is going to be a "Gregory Tour" which
to those who know anything about
tours, means that it will be good and
that things will work out right. This
company has been officially appointed
tour agents for the exposition, and
with Mr. W. W. Welsh, '12, former sec-
retary of the Ann Arbor Civic asso-'
ciation, as special promoter of this
trip, it has promising prospects indeed.
The tour includes first-class rail-
road ticket to San Francisco and re-

Pullman sleeper accommod
seven days at one of the be,

a-
st

hotels in San Francisco, including
breakfast, seven admissions to the ex-
position, admission to 20 attractions
within the grounds, as well as several
side trips. The parties will be per-
sonally conducted, with a man in
charge who will relieve the travellers
of all travel worries. Extra side trips
will be made to surrounding cities and
stop-overs at Denver and Salt Lake
city will be provided for.
There will be one car for every 25
men and at present it is thought that
there will be enough men to go to in-
sure the hiring of two cars. Special
arrangements will be made to furnish
private eating places where the whole
crowd may eat together.
Michigan is not the only university
that will send one of these tours to
the exposition, as Cornell, Minnesota
and Illinois men have already com-
pleted arrangements for the same sort
of a trip.
A special price has been made for
the round trip and reservations can be
made or further information secured
by seeing J. S. Ieonard, 16L, who has
charge of the Ann Arbor end of the

--,

INTERCOLLEGIATE pertaining to policy in student affairs,
and aid the faculty in preserving order
Students in American colleges and in the student body and upholding the
universities who own or can operate dignity of the university.
an automobile have been asked by -o-
Prof. M. I. Pupin, of Columbia, who is Ill feeling against the Germans and
also Serbian consul general, to join a everything German was shown in To-
volunteer corps which proposes to ronto University recently in the case
fight typhus and cholera in Serbia. of Professor H. Lupkow. He could not
The men will be encamped and every teach German because no one register-
precaution taken to insure them ed in his classes. Although allowed
against infection. An appropriation full pay for the year by Toronto, he
of over $10,000 has been made for the came to the United States.
purpost3. --0-

I

-0-
Pennsylvania and Harvard are both1
lining up golf teams for the inter-
collegiate matches which will.come off
some time during May.
-o-
Cornell students are considering the
adoption and election of a student
council with the hope that such a body
may unite more closely all the under-
graduate activities, control all matters

Washington University at St. Louis
dedicated the new buildings of its med-
ical school last Thursday. The three
large buildings which contain labora-
tories, dispensaries and lecture rooms,
will cost over $1,200,000.
-0--
1any New England colleges will be
represented by their administrative
officers at the University of Maine to-
day.

Back to Top

© 2022 Regents of the University of Michigan