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April 22, 1915 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-04-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

....-r... .F

..

.,

bridge and crossings, and are busy
cleaning debris and waste in the cus-
tom and warehouses. About 2,000
troops have already come up on the
Lynch river boats; the rest are ad-
vancing by land. There is much news
to tell and more to hear, but there is
still time for that. We rejoice above
everything else in the thought that
with the passing of Turkish rule a
new era is dawning for Busrah and
Irak."
THREE MICHIGAN MISSIONARIES
MEET DEATH IN ARABIAN WORK
Mrs. M. Thons, '98, Mrs. J. V. Bennett,
'03, and Dr. S. Thoms, '98M, Sac-
rifice Lives for Cause

BLUEBOO0KS INFORM
STUDENT WORKERS
General Information for Incipient In-
vasion Printed for Soliciters in
Four Page Booklet
QUESTION-ANSWER METHOD USED
Bluebooks, 2,000 of them, printed on
four- pages with information for work
in the Busrah canvass have left the
press for committeemen solicitors in
the incipient campus invasion. The.
contents of the booklets which give a
general picture of the whole plan are
essentially as follows:
Section I.
1.-What is Busrah?
A city of 70,000 people.
2.-Where is Busrah?
At the junction of the Tigris and
Euphrates rivers, 40 miles from the
Persian Gulf. Both Persian and {Ara-
bian territory is within a day's camel
ride of Busrah, but the city is on Turk-

e Christi
diaries an
e been re
Stine I. B
aission, w
from hei

lare
nsu
an
nor
hoo
L w
e re
an

. The Michigan missionaries have
died while at their work in Arabia. All
e 13.of them were pioneers in the field,-
RAH Mrs. Marion Wells Thoms, '98, Mrs.
NOTES Jessie Vail Bennett, '03, and Dr. Shar-
on J. Thoms, '98M, who spent 12 years
Turks in Arabia, being the third martyr to
the cause.
Mrs. Thoms died on April 24, 1905,
after having devoted several years of
an In- her life in the foreign field. She was
d war loved by all who came in contact with
ceivedher and had many friends among the
ennett natives.
Mrs. Bennett died on Jan. 21, 1906,
as the after having spent a year and three
r war months of active service in Arabia. She
was a woman of great personal charm
d and and unusual ability in making and
l, has keeping friends wherever she went.
ad Dr. Dr. Thoms died in January 1913.
today His death was due to an accident while1
ls for he was setting up a telephone system
between Matrah and Maskat. Unable
as al- to secure competent native labor, he
main- undertook the task himself, and it was
consul while engaged at it that he fell from
the pole to death. He had been on the
atana, point of erecting a hospital for which
guests the funds had'already been supplied.
on in Mr. Shaw, '11E, writes of him as fol-
today lows: "Thorns performed more oper-
re are ations and treated more cases in his
of the last year than any other medical man
news in Arabia. He has certainly won a
great deal of credit for his university.
is out Michigan men surely ought to feel
ors of proud of him. Anyone who attempts
s. Our to take Thoms place must be at the tip
gether top of his profession."

)L 191 EXPENDITURE
N OUT BY "Y" LEADERS

the'

I

aring Exact figures for this year's Bus-
hos- rah project have been tabulated by
nded "Y" leaders and are as follows:
four, Dr. Van Vlack's salary......$1300.00

ish (now held by British) soil.
3.-What is the history of this re-
gion?
The oldest known civilization of the
world was in this valley. Our alpha-
bet and numerals,, even our religion
originated there.
4.-What are the present living con-
ditions in Busrah? '
The city has no sewers, the refuse
goes into the unpaved streets where
the filthy mud in the rainy season is
knee deep.
The drinking water is taken from
the canal, into which dead camels,
horses and dogs are thrown, the Mos-
lem faith forbidding the burial of
animals. Disease is as common there
as health is here. Dr. Van Vlack
writes that every other man he meets
on the street is blind in one eye or
both, or will'go blind if, not treated,
and Dr. Bennett says that nothing is
done to check the spread of cholera,
malaria, bubonic plague, leprosy, tu-
berculosis, etc.
Busrah is at the junction of three
nations, fe\v of whose people know
enough to fear a germ.
See through the eyes of Miss Holz-
hauser, as she writes, on first arrival,
"If the whole student body could spend
just one day here, the whole thing
would be assured from that day."
5.-How does the war effect Busrah?
Busrah was recently captured from
the Turks by a force of 25,000 British
soldiers, who now hold the city and
are driving the Turks inland.
6.-What is the future of Busrah?
A recent editorial in the London
Times declares that Busrah will soon
become one of the chief commercial'
centers of the near east, because it is
at the door of one of the richest val-
leys in the world.
Irrigation and American machinery
are liberating the wealth of the land,
our representatives are liberating the
wealth of the minds of a great people,
held for centuries in the bonds of dis-
ease and ignorance.
Section II.
1.-How is Michigan connected with
Busrah?
Through six people who have gone
there from the University of Michigan.
2.-Whom do we suppo.t there this
year?
Dr. Van Vlack, '10M, Mrs. Van Vlack
and Miss Holzhauser, nurse '13.
3.-Who else is there from Michigan?
Dr. Bennett, '04M, and Mrs. Bennett,
'07M.
4.-By whom are they supported?
By the Arabian mission of New York
city, an inter-denominational organiza-
tion, promoting work exclusively in
Arabia.
5.-How did the Busrah movement
originate?
It was first crystalized into definite

form when in 1910 Charles F. Shaw,
'10E, offered $10,000 and his life for
engineering work in Busrah, if the
S. C. A. would send a doctor. The
Bennetts happened to be already sta-
tioned at Busrah, Van Vlack, '10M,
volunteered to meet Shaw's offer and
Miss Holzhauser, nurse '13, sailed in
1913.
Last year the war compelled Shaw
and P. C. Haynes, '11E, (whom Shaw
took with him) to withdraw, after sac-
rifices and efforts to remain which
were nothing short of heroic.
6.-How much has been given to
date?
During the five years of its existence,
the students, faculty and alumni of the
university have given $11,567.25 to the
Busrah movement.
7.-Why do we do it?
For two reasons. First, to relieve
some of the frightful suffering of a
land which has given us much, but
now has little.
Second, to present to every man on
the campus a big, unselfish, out-of-
this-country project. We believe that
in straining our vision to see, and our
sympathies to help the distant need,
we will become more truly cosmopoli-
tan and Christian.
8.-Do other universities have for-
eign work?
Yale, Princeton and Pennsylvania
each raise more than three times Mich-
igan's budget for medical and educa-
tional work in other lands.
9.--Who endorses the Busrah move-
ment?
President Harry B. Hutchins, Presi-
dent-Emeritus James B. Angell, Dean
V. C. Vaughn, Prof. J. P. Bird and
many others who have investigated
the work.
Lord Hardinge, viceroy of India, on
a visit last February to Busrah, com-
mended the work of the station most
highly.
10.-What is accomplished at Bus-
.ah?
The hospital last year, under the
Bennetts, Dr. VanVlack and Miss Holz-
hauser, treated more individuals than
the entire population of Ann Arbor.
At present the hospital is crowded to
twice its capacity with wounded Turks
and Arabs.
A terrible scourge of bubonic plague
has broken out at Bahrein, 250 miles
down the gulf from Busrah, and at
present Dr. Van Vlack and Mrs. Van
Vlack are there alone, working day
and night to save lives. For the second
time in succession Dr. Van Vlack may
have to give up his vacation trip to
India and will spend the summer in
what is called the hottest country on
the globe-to save more lives.
AUTHORITIES FAVOR
MISSIONARY CAUSE
(Continued from page 3)
When the question was put to him
he referred to the aptness of the cos-
mopolitan slogan," Above all nations
is hitmanity." Professor Hildner was
one of the speakers who took part in
the campaign in the fraternities last
year. His knowledge of the influences
that cause foreign students to come
to this country led him to state that
almost three quarters of them are
here due to the direct influence of
the Christian missionaries, and that
the rest of them are here because of
indirect influence of the missionaries
in their native lands.
"The support of the medical mis-
sion at Busrah, on the part of the
student body at the university," says
Professor Bird, "appeals to me strong-
ly as a means of developing and
maintaining a much desired inter-
est in world welfare. The elimina-
tion of race hatred will be furthered
in proportion as one's interest is de-

veloped and becomes known. Al-
though individual contributions may
be comparatively insignificant, the
gross sum will mean much in the
minds of the student body, and in-
directly, infinitely more to the thou-
sands benefited by our representatives
in the foreign field."
"I have favored the Busrah project
from the very first," states Prof. W.
D. Henderson. "I believe it is a good
thing for organizations, as well as
individuals, to reach up. One'of the
most significant tendencies of modern
educational institutions, such as our
great universities, is that which tends
to emphasize the spirit of public ser-
vice. Through the Busrah mission,
the Students' Christian Association
seeks to render service of the highest
type, and I think it 4 fine thing that
the students of the University of Mich-
igan have gn oppgrtulity each year to
participate in this great philanthropic
work,"
Mission Aids Both Cross and Crescent
Mohammedans, followers of the cres-
cent, as well as Christians are cared
for by the Michigan mission at 3usrah.
This is done by cooperation of the
Christian Red Cross society with the
recently founded Red Crescent society
which does practically the same kind

Disbursements
From April 1, 1910, to April"
To Dr. Van Vlack.......... $
To Philip C. Haynes......
To Dr. Bennett...........
To insurance for Van Viack
To home expenses, five cam-
paigns...... ..... ..

From April 1, 1910, to April
1, 1915...............$11567.25
Overdraft.... .........$ 28.07

Outstanding not
German-American bank...
German-American bank
German-American bank
Farmers &Mechanics bank

600.00
600.00
450.00
400.00

$ 2050.00
Total liabilities........,.$ 2078.07>
Audited by Herman Gross April 15,
This indcbtedness is due entirely to
pledges given in all good faith during
he last five years, but never paid. Our

1, 1915:
6485.00
600.00
609.23
1576.28
2324.81

AR AB PORT CLAIMS
STRATEGIC STA
(Continued from page 3)
264,000 tons of grain are expor
one year; untold possibilities lie
historic fertility of the surrou
plains which are rapidly beir
claimed by western civilization.
Several authorties attest the i
tance of the Arabian city, inc
Talcott Williams of Columbia U
sity, Dr. S. M. Zwemer, one c
greatest authorities on Arabia ai
viceroy of India who recently X
visit to the Arabian port.

r

WETi' E~G
NEW H/ PES
8 K&RA'T AT $3.50 UP

WEDDING STATIO
NEWEST STYL
LET US QUOTE PR

DIAMONDS'
FOR
APRIL

WATC H E S
FOR MEN ELGIN MOVEMENT 20 YEARS CASE $10.00
FOR LADIES GOLD BRACELET WATCHES FROM $12.00 L
HAMILTON, HOWARD, WALTHAM & ELGIN MOVEMENTS
NEW STYLES IN JEWELRY
EYE GLASSES REPAIRED & LENSES GROUND TO ORDE
Hailer JewlyCo.
MICHIGAN State Street Jewelers
.JEWELRY EMI

representatives in Busrah mi
paid regularly. The steady incr
nearly $600 each year in actua
receipts leads the association to
that it can cancel this indebted:
adding $500 each year for ti
four years to its yearly Busrah
Every unpaid pledge howevel
breach of faith with those heroi
igan alumni who are giving the
to this project.

Receipts

Date palms in rear of the hospital.

Dr..Van Vlack's and Mrs. Van
Vlack's vacation in India..
Dr. .Van Vlack's insurance
premium .................
Mrs. Van Vlack's return to
America next year......
Miss Holzhauser's salary....
Overdraft on last year's re-
ceipts ...................
Expense of home campaign..
P rtial payment of deficit due
to unpaid pledges ..........
(Pledges as yet unpaid have
forced borrowing money to

240.00
400.00
250.00
600.00
28.07
400.00
500.00

, and we
om them,
wounded

e been busy to-
women making
The Red Cres-
and supplies
bere we 'come

CALKINS'
Pharmacy
324 S. STATE STREET
ANN. ARBOR,-MICH.

er 15.-No music or singing
today so as not to attract
o our services. Yesterday
rumors of a big engage-
ke place today, and at noon
.ear plainly the boom, boom
from down the river.
er 20.-The Turks evacuatE
er 22.-Sunday morning
how different from the past
had a praise service in the
I our voices were raised in
thanksgiving. The Union
over the custom house, and
flying everywhere. British
re on patrol 'duty at the

pay salaries.)
Total ...................$3718.07
S. C. A. COMMITTEE
ORGANIZES CANVASS
(Continued from page 3)
reports of the day's work will be
turned in by each team.
The campaign will close Sunday
night with the 57th annual S. C. A.
meeting, this year to be held in Hill
auditorium, where Paul B. Blanshard,
'14, will speak briefly concerning the
Busrah movement and Raymono Rob-
ins of Chicago, will deliver the ad-
dress of the evening. This meeting
will be the last of the year in the
series of Union services in the audi-
torium.

Meet your College friends

AT

Newberr Ta Ri oom
"THE BEST TABLE IN TOWN"

UNIVERSITY Y.W. C. A.

OPEN TO GENTLEMEN ACCOMPANIED BY LADIES

k

slshcs and Glasswarc for Sale or Rcut
Ho ag 's
Largest Line of Trunks and Bags
Hoag 's
Waitcrs Coats and Aprons at
Hpag 's
Summer ilats and. Caps at

11

r_1c

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