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February 12, 1915 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1915-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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lichigan

Daily

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 1915.

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BREAK RECORD FOR
PERFECT ST UENTS
College of Literature, Science and the
Arts Boasts 28 All "A"
- Students

LACY WILL OUTLINE
COUNCILS STATUS
Alteration of Views on "Police Duty,"
Causes Disagreement with
Faculty

I

TODAY
Prof. Anesaki speaks on "A Prophet of
Japanese Buddhism" in Alumni Me-
morial hall, 4:15 o'clock.
Dr. John Mez speaks on "The Next
Practical Step-The Conditions of
Peace," in Newberry hall, 4:00
o'clock.
Sir Douglas Mawson gives an illustrat-
ed lecture on "Racing With Death
Through Antarctic Blizzards" in Hill
auditorium, 8:00 o'clock.
Bridge tourney at Union, 7:30

JAPANESE PROFESSOR TO GIVE
SECOND OF LECTURES TODAY
Prof. Masaharu Anesaki, delivered the
first lecture of two which he will give
in Ann Arbor, yesterday afternoon in
Sarah Caswell Angell hall on the sub-
ject of "Japanese Art." Professor An-
esaki was formerly connected with the
Imperial University of Tokio, and was
appointed professor of Japanese liter-
ature and life at Harvard University
a few years ago.
Professor Anesaki will lecture again
at 4:15 o'clock today in the west gal-
lery of Alumni Memorial haft, when
he will talk on "A Prophet of Japanese
Buddhism."

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1915

CLASS WINS FIRST PLACE MAY START PUBLICITY SCHEME

More students in the College of Lit-
erature, Science and the Arts received
perfect records of "A" in all subjects
this semester than in any former year.
The term's number is 26, with two oth-
er students whose records have not

linois club dinner at Union,
o'clock.

6:00

's TOMORROW
Catholic Students' club dance, St.
Thomas hall, 2:00 o'clock.
t Membership dance at the Union, 9:00
o'clock.
All-Fresh preliminary tryouts for
track, in Waterman gymnasium, 2:00

I TO REPORT
COMIN6 MEET

i Must Qualify
ting Against
.phomores

Before1

~ been completely reported. Last year
was a record-breaker for scholarship,
with 18 all "A" students.
The class of 1915 carries off the
scholastic honors with 10 representa-
tives, followed by the freshmen with
eight, the sophomores with five, and
the juniors trailing along in last place
with three. Eight of the 26 came to
the university with advanced standing
from other institutions, mainly normal
colleges.
Following is the list of names: Elsie
Backus, '17,.Ann Arbor; Ralph Carson,
'17, Ann Arbor; Chester W. Clark, '18,
Ann Arbor; Harry L. Clark, '15, Ash-
tabula, Ohio; A. 'Leone Gieske, '15,
Chelsea;Aurora W. Clement, '15, Vicks-
burg; Eva Coons, '18, Findlay, Ohio;
Clarence B. Goshorn, '15, Grande Rap-
ids; Leon Greenebaum, '16, Newton,
Kansas; Harry M. Hawley, '15, Ann
Arbor; Florence Haxton, '15, Oakfield,
N. Y.; Philip M. Iloff, '18, Honesdale,
Pa.; Pearl E. Lockhart, '17, Detroit;
Walter G. Marburger, '15, Callery, Pa.;
Florence Middaugh, 115, Jackson;
George Myers, '18, Columbia City, Ind.;
Carl W. Newmann, '18, Detroit; Vine
B. Peters, '15, Charlotte; J. F. Pobanz,
'18, Sebawaing; Harold W. Rosenheim,
'18, Detroit; Zadoe S. Rothschild, '17,
Baltimore, Md.; Clara R. Stahl, '15,
Culver, Ind.; Mabel M. Stickle, '18,
Three Oaks; Harold B. Teegarden, '17,
Greenville, Ohio; M. Muriel Tyson, '16,
Flora Dale, Pa.; Rosa G. Walker, '18,
Battle Creek. Alice Lloyd, '16, Ann Ar-
bor, and William A. Paton, '15, receiv-
ed "A" grades in each subject reported
on to date.

As a result of the student council's
action in abolishing its "polic6 duty,"
a definition of the extent of this step
is to be made by this body to the sen-
ate council. H. M. Lacy, '15, presi-
dent of the student council is now pre-
paring a statement of this matter
which will be presented to Dean Henry
M. Bates, of the Law School, within a
few days.
After the demonstration which fol-
lowed "Joe" Reinger's scheme to have
Hughitt and Maulbetsch "throw" the
Cornell game, the student council of-
ficially altered its views as to the
course it should pursue in regard to
student riots., A statement of this ac-
tion was made in a letter to the edi-
tor of The Michigan Daily, dated No-
vember 12, 1914.
What the council meant by giving-

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OF CRAIG

all candidates for the freshmen
team who wish to take part in
et with the sophs; should report
gym tomorrow afternoon, is the
icement made by Coach Farrell

up its "police duty' was not then ex-
actly defined by that body, but most of
the members of the body are of the
opinion that the student council still
intends to investigate individual cases
of conduct, and has not given up that.
power, but does not intend to prepare
lists of "rioters" or have its mem-
l ers act as informers of unruly stu-
dents.
Other duties of the council are not
affected by this change. In order to
further secure the support of the stu-
dent body, councilmen are consider-
ing the advisability of conducting a
publicity campaign, so that the func-
tions of the council will be better un-
dersto ,d.
"POMANDER WALK" TICKETS GO
ON SALE AT WARR'S TODAY

ILLINOIS CLUB MEN G
AT LINCOLN DINNE]
Dean J. R. Effinger and
Dowrie will speak at the
dinner of the Illinois clut
be held at the Michigan U
o'clock tonight. Harold R.
'15L, will also speak, d
Dunne, '17L, will preside,
mittee expects to arrang
program. Officers of thec
vited all Illinois students

to

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Eugene B. Sanger to Succeed St. John
As Director of 1915 Union
Performance
CANDIDATES TO TRYOUT MONDAY
Eugene B. Sanger, of New York, has
been secured to produce the Michigan
Union opera, "All That Glitters." Bert
St. John is in the west, and will not
handle this year's play.
Mr. Sanger has had wide experience
with both professional and amateur
productions, and has been connected
with Daniel Frohman and A. H. Woods.
He has directed productions of the

"zt Preliminary .trials will be staged at
, the this time, and everyone who is expect-
mna-
true- ing to try for the 1918 squad has been
pbell, ordered to report by the coach. Those
R. E. who will be unable to put in an ap-
:land, pearance, have been instructed to an-
HI. E. nounce the fact to Farrell before the
Neu- time of the trials.
Rice, Scofield sprang a surprise last night
yder, by running three laps in 46 seconds
ward which is exceptionally fast time. Sco-
field is a first year man, and was on
the quartet of yearlings which won
N the half mile relay race last fall, be-
'URE tween the halves of the Pennsylvania
football game. Scofield has been run-
4:00 ning some exceptionally close races
with Captain Smith and O'Brien, in
the 85 yard dash, nosing out this pair
on several occasions, with the two yard
ster- handicap which is allotted.
11 of The 1918 squad will lose the services
nom- of "Jimmy" Craig as track coach, as
war. the former hurdler and football player
"The has left the university following his
ion." graduation.. This leaves "Hap" Haff
great as the sole mentor of the first year
eace. squad, anti the quarter mile champion
war- is expected to assist Coach Farrell in
imes the daily workouts.
sness
civ- RETAIN PLAN OF TICKET ISSUE
r se- Distribution of Track Pasteboards to
this Follow Last Year's Method
"The According to officials of the athletic
tions association, the same plan, which was'1
nter- followed last year, for the distribution1
will of tickets to indoor track meets, will
be followed this year. Because of the

Cast Rehearsals Will Be Held
Day in Order to Gain
Perfection

Every

FAMOUS SCHOLARS APPEAR AT
BANQUET OF COSMOPOLITANS
Dr. Angell, Sir Bose, Prof. Anesaki
and Dr. Mez Form Quartet
of Distinguished Men
Probably no more representative
group of world educators or scholars
have gathered about one board than
were present at the ninth annual ban-
quet of the Cosmopolitan club held
last evening at Newberry hall. Among;
the men who talked, bringing out one
theme-cosmopolitanism-were Pres-
ident-Emeritus James B. Angell, Sir
J. C. Bose of the University of Cal-
cutta, Professor M. Anesaki of the Im-
perial university, Tokio and Dr. John
Mez, president of the International
Federation of Students of which the
local Cosmopolitan club is a branch.
Prof. M. Anesaki drew a significant
moral from the friendly relations
which have sprung up between the
Russian and the Japanese, since the
Russo-Jap conflict. Sir Bose traced
the beginning of cosmopolitanism from
the early Indian universities. Presi-
dent-Emeritus Angell, the first speak-
er, expressed his joy that although'
many foreign nations were at war
across the seas, their representatives
at Michigan were gathered peacefully
under one roof and at one table. Pres-
ident Harry B. Hutchins was present
at the dinner.
Junior Zits Nominate Two Councilmen
At a meeting of the junior lits yes-
terday afternoon, Lawrence S. Roehm,I
'16, ind Wilson M. Shafer, '16,' were
nominated by their class for student
councilmen. The elections will take
place on next Tuesday afternoon. I

Tickets for the Comedy club's sec-
ond presentation of "Pomander Walk,"
by L. N. Parker, to'be given Tuesday
night at the Whitney theater, will go
on sale at 1:00 o'clock this afternoon
at Wahr's book store. The entire first
floor and balcony will be reserved. As
Tuesday night's production is that
which corresponds to the performance
last year of "The Scarecrow," which
drew a packed house, it is expected
that the major portion of the seats
will be sold before the store closes at
6:00 o'clock.
Members of the club are unwilling
to rest on their oars, and are of the
opinion that there are a few kinks
that must be ironed out before Tues-
day night. Consequently the entire cast
will rehearse every night for the rest
of the week and Monday afternoon and
evening.
Hockey Teams to Start Second Round
Interclass hockey has progressed in-
to the second round and four games
have been played on a schedule com-
prising about twice that many, each
team having been in action at least
once. As' a result of the work so far
done, the science team looms up as
the strongest championship contend-
er, with the combined senior and fresh
lit, and the soph engineer teams as

Triangle club of Princeton, the Hasty
Pudding club of Harvard and the Co,
lumbia club, of New York. He is a
late director of the American Academy
of Dramatic Arts, of New York.
Mr. Sanger has'written that he will
arrive on Sunday, and will spend sev-
eral days here conferring with K. S.
Baxter, '15, general chairman of the
opera.1
The candidates for the cast, who1
have already received parts will have
tryouts Monday. The chorus will alsoc
practice on Monday. A list of those
still eligible is posted at the Union.,
The exact time of these tryouts will

be announced later.
Y. M. C. A. TO GIVE DINNER
TO SECURE FILIAL RELATIONS,
As an aid to the promotion of bet-
ter relations between fathers and sons,
the city Y. M. C. A. will hold a banquet
tonight at 6:00 o'clock at the associa-
tion building. The diners will be ad-
dressed by several prominent speak-
ers among whom will be the Rev.
Ames Maywood, of Jackson. An effort
is being made to secure a representa-
tive of the university faculty to ad-
dress the gathering.
PROSPECTIVE ARCHITECTS MAY
HAVE TO TAKE EXAMINATIONS
With the object of introducing legis-
lation which would make compulsory
the examination of prospective archi-
tects in the state of Michigan, the
Michigan State Architectural associa-
tion held a convention in Ann Arbor
during the last examination week and
authorized the drawing up of a bill to
be presented to the' state legislature.
More than forty architects from va-
rious cities in the state were in attend-
ance and during their stay here an ex-
hibition of the work of the local col-
lege of architecture was held.

t
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tinction of being
to reach the sum
and the south Me
one of the scienti
Shackleton on hii
expedition.
The purposes c
dition was to
whether the lane
kes of the U. S.
covered in 1840,
lecture is an acco
and is profusely
tern slides and n
by an expert pb
companied the e:
cently been deli,
tional Geographi
capacity audienc
large eastern citi
described by emit
of the most thrill
kind.,

s to Survey Blissfield
ell, '16, Phil D. Hall,
tnson, '17, Whitley B.
Frank Olmstead, act-
the Y. M. C. A., make'
Y" extension workef's
a religious survey of
an, this week-end.
work teams have trips
very week-end till
the surveys are to be
on with county Y. M.

inadequacy of Waterman gymnasium,
the board of regents last year passed;
a ruling, limiting the total attendance'
at such contests to 500.
Seniors will be given first chance to
attend the Notre Dame meet scheduled
for February 27. Their numbers, up
to the capacity of the gym, will be
drawn tomorrow. The numbers not
drawn, will be placed with the num-
bers of the other classes, and from this
total, the tickets entitling the owner
to witness the Varsity meet will be
drawn.

close seconds.
The standings follow:
Team Won
Science............I
Senior-fresh lit......1
Soph engineer . 1
Law ........1
Senior-junior eng. .. 0
Soph lit ............ 0
Fresh engineer .... 0

Hobart Guild to Hold Meeting
Hobart Guild will hold its F
meeting at 7:30 o'clock tonight
ris hall. The meeting will be
ed by a Pre-Lenten dance. Mi
ry Tatlock and Mrs. B. Coe wi
eron the party.
Fellowship Applications Due 1
Applications for fellowships
University of Michigan for th
1915-1916, will not be considere
March 1. Dean K. E. Guthe,
Graduate School, urges all prol
applicants to apply at once, a
were turned away last year o'
late registration.

Lost
0
0
0
1
1
1
1

Pet
1.000
1.000
1.000
.500
.000
.000
.000

Tonight at Hill Auditorium
SIR DOUGLAS MAWSON, K.B., D.Sc. D.E. (Antarctic Explorer)

of the rarest kind and variety held a large audience spellbound."-.-NEW YORK H

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