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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 16, 1914 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-12-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

.10AN DAILYV.

$5.25

TS

A1LUMNI ASSOCIATE
IN RECENT PERIOD
Effect (Consolidation of 'Groups from
Different Departments
Eight Years
Ago
MICHIGAN ALUMNUS COMMENCED
IN 1893 AS PRIVATE PROJECT

gan Alumnus for life without further
charge.

,\ ;\
as r t a
x ; rte. F . T ,t
,. 1,l } _ r i . _
.L / ,

dl

and

Purchasers of X

in Town Toques

PARTY GOVERNMENT IN TIHE
UNITED STATES OF AWERICA.

New Years Gifts

CHARLES D. WILEY

Publications of Harvard and
Only Ones to Surpass
Alumnus in Age

Yale By William M. Sloane (369 S63)
The development of parties, pecu-
liar to American government, is treat-

St.

over Cushing's

See Our Wind

h+c4 igan

ADAMS, HEAD OF TIFE ECONOMICS DEPARTMENT

e many Michigan profes-
Lve acquired an interna-
ation may be mentioned
Carter Adams, head of
cs department. During
Professor Adams has
l in statistical work, both
ry and abroad, and many
nners at the university are
g to realize thathe
~s to the Micbigan camr-

In 1887 he was appointed to the pro-
fessorship of political economy and
finance at the University of Michigan
and he has held that position ever
since.
Professor Adans is particularly well
known in this country as the origina-
tor of the system of railway account-:
ing which has been made compulsory
for all railroads operating within the
jurisdiction of the United States in-
terstate commerce commission. He
was a director of the division of trans_-
portation in the 11th census bureau,'
and between the years of 1887 and
1911, he was a member of the inter-
state commerce commission, having
full charge of the division of statistics
and accounts of that board during the
last five years of his incumbency. He
also cooperated with Dean M. E.
Cooley of the engineering department
in appraising and re-valuating the
railroads of the state of Michigan.

lams -was born at
December 31, 1851,
eing of New Eng-
Adams family was
settlers of the re-
ather being a min-
.imself of the mea-
cilities which his
, and his prepara-
ge was undertaken
my, Iowa. After
om that institution
)llege, and in 1874
with the degree of

at
in
a
at
)n-

As a recognition of his ability along
particular lines of accounting, Pro-
fessor Adams was, in 1913, called by
the Republic of China to act as a mem-
ber of a commission on the standard-
ization oif accounts for the railways
of the Chinese empire. He returned,
from this work about a month ago,
and for the rest of the college year,
he will be engaged with his univer-
sity work.. However, during the first
semester of next year, the board of
regents hasgranted him a leave of
absence to return to China and com-
plete his work for the Chinese gov-
ernment.
Professor Adams is a writer of con-
siderable ability along economic and
financial lines. He holds membership
in a number of prominent educational
associations. in 1898, Iowa College
conferred the degree of L.L.D. upon
him, and the University of Wisconsin
honored him in a like way in 1903.

Michigan's alumni association has
only comparatively recently been or-
ganized as a general association. For
many years, the alumni of the univer-
sity were organized by their respective
departments, each havingits separate
association, and each operating dis-
tinctly as an individual unit. In 1908,
a consolidation of these different
groups was effected, a general alumni
association beingtformed w h i c h
brought them all together under one
head.
The alumni individually are rep-
resented by a board of directors com-
posed of seven members. Two of
these are elected each year at the
general meeting of the alumni asso-
ciation held during the month of June.
These seven elect their own officers,
and the latter serve as the general
association officers. A general secre-
tary is also elected by this board,
whose duty is to carry on the work
of the association, and to act as editor
of the Michigan Alumnus.
The Alumnus was established in
1893 by a few private individuals, and
was owned and operated by them un-
til 1908, at the time of the consolida-
tion, when the board of directors
bought the magazinedoutrightr from
the publishers. As a privately owned
venture, the Alumnus had only - a
small subscription list, and was car-
ried on along a small scale. Before
the time of its origin in 1893, all alum-
ni news was printed by the other pub-
lications on the campus, but there
was no individual paper.
Since it has been taken over by the
general association, the Alumnus has
increased. and grown, until today it
is one of the leading papers of its
kind in the country. It has the dis-
tinction of being one of the oldest
alumni magazines, those at Harvard
and Yale being the only ones which
surpass it in point of time As a
monthly publication, it has the largest
subscription list of any like paper
among the larger universities.
The alnumni association has no or-
ganic connection with the university,
all the work being carried on under
the direction of the alumni and the
board of directors. The association,
however, receives $600 a year from
the university "for advertising the
university in the Michigan Alumnus."
Subscription to the magazine is $1.50
a year, but a reduction is made to
those who pay for It several years in
advance.
There are 1,500 endowed members of
the association, who pay $35 in seven
annual installments 'to become such.
Five dollars is paid on each payment,
of which four dollars, or 28 dollars in
all, goes into a permanent endowment
fund, of which only the interest Is
available to the association. This
fund now amounts to over $27,000,
and is steadily increasing. Sincei
commencement last June, over 40 newi
endowment members have been se-A
cured, and of these, five have paid
their endowment fee in full., All en-
dowment members receive the Michi-

ed rather exhaustively in Mr. Sloane's
book, just recently published. Con-
siderable space is devoted to the be-
ginnings of parties, and some of the
theories advanced in this connection
are not in accord with those commonly
credited. Following an explanation
of the evolution of the great parties F
up to the present time, the writer
takes occasion to comment at length
on the influence of parties in contem-
porary politics.
Although the style employed by the
author is a bit dull, and the exposi-
tion is involved in spots, the book is
interesting in the main, to even the
casual student of government. The
study seems to be sound and thought-
ful. The present interest in the sub-
ject of parties makes the book of
timely importance.
II

Stato ers

ow Priftters - Bind4

112 South Main Street

Ann Arbor's Greatest Ct
Invites You

Sh

Finest Assortment of Holiday Goods

To See Our Popular-Priced Chrilstrmaeks Gifts

Practical Suggestions

Traveling Sets
Pullman Slippers

Collar Bags
Manicure Sets

The Mayer-Schairer

Poker Sets

in the'City

Heidelberg, Berlin
e returned to this
accept a position as
litical economy at
-. He became an
at that institution
nd he coitinued in
til 1887, meanwhile
be post of a non-
on economic sub-
s Hopkins and the

Universal Electric Grill broils, fries,
'bakes, and toasts right at the table.
Toasters, Sad Irons, Coffee Machines,
Stoves, Chafing Dishes, Egg Boilers,
and Curling Irons.

Traveling Cups
Thermos Bottles
Gillette Razors

Smoking Stands
Ash Receivers
Tobacco Jars
Cigarette Boxes
Humidores
Book Racks
Desk Sets
Memo. Pads
Jardineres
Crumb Trays
Dinner Gongs

Carving Sets
Flash Lamps

Ice and Roller Skates

Inl Our Toylatnd

Stuffed Animals of all sorts.

Erectors, Sleds, and Friction Toys

STUDENTS FINISH ector of the camp, will speak to the
OR ANNUAL SMOKER studeits.
The smoker is an annual event and
or civil engineers who it, along with the camp dance, which
p Davis last summer will be held this year in February,
"Camp Smoker" at the offers the only opportunity for those
on, Friday, January 8, who have attended the camp, to renew
for which have already acquaintances and to talk over old
ed. The prog'ram will times.
he most part, of vaude-
>y several mem'bers of For Musical Instruments of Every
d the singing of camp Description, Victrolas, and Edison Di-
rn slides showing scenes amond Disc Machines, go to SCHAE-
will be thrown on the BERLE & SON MUSIC HOUSE, Main
rof. C. T. Johnston, dir- Street. eod W

Schmaher Hardware Cl

308-10-12-" S. Main Street

Phones 174-175-M.

U
U

MONEY-RISING SALE-All Cloth-
ing, Banmacians, Overcoats, Suits,
Meu:'s Furnishing oods and Hats at
Sacrifice Prices.
A LIEN'S COOD) CLOTHES STORE,
~ Main Street.

A new lot of xubber sole shoes--
black and tan-Just received. Wagner
lb Co., State St. 67-70
Fountain pens make good Christmas
presents. University Ave. Pharmacy.
tf

Phone 2280 for quick Taxi
gage service.
Students attention. When
your Xmas acation call 15. I
baggage checked direct from
destination.

AV

I

~fr

v

(OUR STOCK)

ichafiner & Marx Clothes at $1.50 to $3.00 lower than any other
prices quoted.

& $28 Suits & O'coats

V $22.50"
"4

46

$16.98
$14.98
$13.98
$12.98

)

to6k

Sweaters, Odd Trousers
and Raincoats
at Reduced Prices
Clothing

$15.
$13.50
$12.

$16.56 Suits & O'coats

i4

ii

64

$10.98
$9.98
$8.98
$7.98

ations

Lutz

Store

Mackinaws
1/4OFF

ArTA

217

South Ma.in Street

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