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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 21, 1914 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-10-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

t Will Be Given, To Which All
[en Wearing Letter Will
Be Invited
s have been completed for a
g of the recently organized "M"
> be held the evening before the
ootball game. A banquet will
n, to which all men who have
te Varsity "M" will be invited.
e perfect organization will be
at the gathering, Iwhich will be
together" affair, for the pur-
arousing enthusiasm. The pur-
f the club is to create interest
the alumni in university ath-
club now has 68 actiye mem-
nd a large number of associate
rs. The officers are: president,
J. Killilea, '85L; football vice-
ent, Edwin Denby, '96L; base-
ce-president, E. C. Shields, '96L;
vice president, N. A. Kellogg,
easurer, Homer L. Heath, '07;
ry, Floyd A. Rowe, '08E. Among
embers are ..included, Ralph
'11, track star of 1911; assistant
Schulz; H. Graver, '04E, who
eston's running mate; and John
)bard, '87E, of Chicago, who is
member of the athletic board.
Harding, who won his letter in
11 in 1892, comes the farthest
nd the meeting, his home being
to Rico.
tal of 500 "M" men are eligible
nbership in the club, and it is
ed that the active membership
e greatly increased at the time
Penn banquet.

USEF[ECHR
Educational Department May Have
Training Course For high
School Pedagogues
REGENTS WILL ACT ON MATTER
AMichigan in the near future will
have a demonstration school the equal
of any in the country, if the plans of
the educational department find favor
with the regents. This school will
offer a thorough practical training to
prospective high school teachers and
will he to the high school what Ypsi-
lanti and other normal schools are to

Men

of

1

the elementary grade schools.
"Michigan," said Professor Whitney,
head of the educational department,
in speaking of the proposed school,
"is the only large university in the
west without a practical demonstra-
tion school for those desiring to obtain
experience and training in teaching
the higher grades. That is the pri-
mary purpose of our educational de-
partment. We have laboratories for
our chemists and scientists, we have
shops for our engineers, and hospitals
where prospective doctors may obtain
.training, but we send men and women
out to teach without any practical ex-
perience whatsoever. If anyone would
send us a doctor who had never been
in a hospital. or a dentist who has
only theoretical knowledge, we would
think it absurd; but that is exactly
what we are doing to our children."
The plans provide for a complete
high school, in its own building, where
students would conduct classes in all
ligh school subjects under the super-
vision of trained experts. While act-
ual plans have not been drawn for the
building, inasmuch as everything
rests with the regents, who will con-
sider the matter at their next meet-
ing in November, Professor Whitney
and other members of the department
who have been working on the idea
for some time, are confident that be-
fore long Michigan will have a mod-
ern university high school.

1
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F,
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y Waterman, Graduate
College, To Teach
Semitics

RAIR OF

RELIGION

the board of
y Waterman
Semitics, his
in with the
y year 1915.
,vas born in
prepared for

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J. DONALD JORDAN

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FRESHMEN MAY BE HOUSED IN
DORMITORIES IN NEAR FUTURE

Experiences of Other Colleges
Lead Michigan To Adopt
New System

May

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.llege, Michigan, in 1894,
there the degree of Bach-.
in 1898. In 1900 he re-'
the Theological School at
e degree of Bachelor of
he two following years he
Testament studies at the
f Oxford, England. Later
rofessor of Old Testament
id literature in Hillsdale
* although absent from
on special leave for the
Estudy, he retained the

Within the range of possibilities
during the next few years, is the ad-
dition of dormitories in which Michi-
gan will house at least part of her
freshmen. On account of the new
rushing rules of the fraternities, which
will go into effect next year, at least
500 more men than ever before will
be forced to find rooms in the houses
about the campus. This does notcon-
sider the annual increase in enroll-

SAquascutum Overe

ourp

not neea The year 1906-7 was spent by Pro- I
umni will fessor Waterman in study, on leave of
ting. absence from Hillsdale, in the Univer-
i that the sity of Berlin, during which time,
the year's special attention was given to Semi-
Vill not in tics and comparative religion. During
of eastern the summer quarters of 1909 and 1910
y fair for lie was in residence at the University
prospects of Chicago. In the fall of 1910 he was
years, but appointed fellow in Semitics and spent
Michigan from January to September, 1911, in
the study of cuneiform tablets in the
'rs, British Museum. He was reappointed
'E, '12L. fellow in Semitics in October, 1911,
and again in June, 1912. He received
GUILD the degree of Doctor of Philosophy
from Chicago University in September,'
pastor of 1912. The year 1912-13 he spent in
al church, preparing in the British Museum, and
r the sec- in publishing in the American Journal
re at the of Semitic Languages a series of cune-
evening at .form texts. In June, 1913, Professor.
of "The Waterman was elected to the chair of
Old Testament and comparative relig-
under the ion in the Meadville Theological
hip before School, which chair he is holding at
fester are: the present time. He spent the past
Herbert summer in London assisting Professor
iniversity; R. F. Harper in preparing Volume 14
olt, editor of his "Assyrian and Babylonian Let-
ember 20, ters." Professor Harper recently,
San Fran- died and this work is to be finished by
r Lynn H. Professor Waterman.
Institute, President Harry B. Hutchins, in re-
marking upon the election of Profes-
sor Waterman to the university fac-
ouncement ulty, said: "The University is fortu-
;he Ameri- nate in-securing the services of Pro-
gan of the fessor Waterman. He is a profound
a full col- student in the Semitic field, and an
a descrip- inspiring teacher and he will be found
of the de- to be not only a thorough scholar, but
f the Uni- also a pleasant and forceful public
announce- speaker."
inary an--
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meet.
In the last issue of the Alumnus,
considerable space is given to a dis-
cu'ssion of the subject. The matter
of dormitories for men has never been
seriously considered before at Miclii-
gan, because a great many of the new
men have moved directly into frater-
nity houses, and the rest have been
scattered throughout the town in the
various rooming houses. However
Michigan's freshman class has grown
to such an extent that, during the
next few years, some action .on the
housing of these men will have to be
taken by the university.
Michigan's sister college,' M. A. C.
provides "dorms" for a number of her
students, and the experience of the
"Farmers" has shown that the idea is
successful. Many of the eastern col-
leges, and the majority of the far
western colleges, have finally arrived
at the dormitories as a solution of
the problem.

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TWO ORGANIZATIONS UNITE TO
GIVE FIRST AID INSTRUCTION
Arrangements have been made by
the Boat club and the University
health service to give instructions in
the new Schaefer method of resuscita-
tion to the campus at large, and espe-
cially to the freshmen. Dr. H. H.
Cummings will demonstrate the Schae-
fer method to the new men at the
regular gym classes beginning next
month. He will illustrate the move-
ments from the platform, and the stu-
dents will imitate and practice them
on the floor.
In addition to the lessons in the
gym, the two organizations have se-
cured 5,000 copies of a pamphlet which
is issued by the State Board of Health
at Lansing, explaining the Schaefer
method, which they will distribute to
students at the All-Fresh dinner to-
night, at the gym, and by committees
selected from the upper classes to dis-
tribute them in the department build-

When in Detroit we hQpe you
department.*

will give us the opportunity of showing you through

r

A

t

TAILOR

,

D ET

Lafayette Boulevard and Wayne Street

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