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October 27, 1912 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-10-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

r._

ICULTY MEN
ARE ISSUED

E ESSRS F N(mA('EI i
Ohs ANI) WO{RKS loll

L

VOLUME ON ANNIVERSARY
Committee athers Speeches mt
Other 3literil Relating to ele-
bralion Last June.
Various member. of the university
faculty are engaged at present in writ-
ing or editing manuscripts dealing
with subjects connected with their
special line of work. When published,
some of these books will be used as
texts, while others are intended prim-
arily for the general reader.'
A memorial volume of the Seventy-
fifth Anniversary Celebration, held last
June, is being prepared by a commit-
tee consisting of Professors Fred N.
Scott, Louis A. Strauss, and Thomas
E. Rankin. It will contain all the
speeches delivered on that occasion,
and also an historical account of the
university from 1887 to the present
time.
The first volume of Prof. C. H. Van
Tyne's History of the American Revo-
lution, is expected to make its ap-
pearance some time within the text,
two or three months.
The New Market campaign of the
Civil war forms the subject of a book
recently written by Prof. Edward R.
Turner. Prof. Turner is now working,
on a manuscript dealing with the de-
velopment of the English cabinet be-
tween 1660 and 1760.
"The Life of Robert Tooms," a man
who was once regarded as a possible
president of the Confederate states,
is the title of a book soon to be pub-
lished by Prof. Ulrich B. Phillips. The
correspondence of Alexander H. Stev-
ers, Howell Cobb, and Robert Tooms
will be edited by Prof. Phillips, and
published as a report of the Histor-
ical Manuscript Commission of the
American Historical Association.
Prof. Egbert T. Loeffler, of the den-

TO TEACH lHEIi 1o1W TO YELL.
Yearlings Arouse Animosity of Upper-
j llassmen by eekiI:g JOs A:
Chieerleaiders.
Much discussion has been going the
rounds of the big university dailies
regarding the appointment of "yell-
masters" and just whati they should
do. At the University of llinois, when
th call was sent out for cheer leaders,
but o[ upperclassman, a junor, re-
sl)onded. However, six freshmen were
very anxious for the job, and were only
deprived of it by the hostil comment
aroused, it being held that it was "al-
together contrary to university tradi-
tions." To add to the excitement, a
senior declared that "it was the duty
of cheer-leader merely to anlnounce
the yells and.lead the cheering, and
not to cavort in unusual gyrations and
antics.
In this connection, the Indiana Stu-
dent says: "The most successful yell-
leaders have been constantly before
the crowd, keeping the rooters in good
spirits, and at high tension froi the
time the whistle is blown until the
game is over. To cite a specific illus-
tiation, 'Rusty Parker, of Wisconsin,
one of the most famous cheer-leaders
of all time, was before the bleachers
constantly, never, for a minute, allow-
ing the rooters' enthusiasm to die. As
soon as spirits began to lag, he re-
sorted to eccentric dancing and vaude-
ville 'stunts' to bolster them up, and,
as a result Wisconsin was famous for
its organized rooting."
At the University of Colorado, much
interest is taken in choosing the yell-
master, who is allowed two assistants.
tal department, and Dr. Herman
Printz, of George Washington Univer-
sity are writing a book on Materia
Medica, Pharmacology and Practical
Therapeutics. When published it will
be used as a text in Dr. Loeffler's
classes.
A new case book on agency is being
compiled by Prof. Edwin C. Goddard
of the law department. It will be put
out by the West Publishing Co., of St.
Paul, Minnesota, in connection with
its American case book series, and
will probably be used in the univer-
sity next semester.,
Prof. Warren W. Florer, of the Ger-
man department, and Prof. Jessen of
(Continued on page 4.)

NEW MICHIGAN GAME
IS AN ANCIENT ONE

Soccer Can be Traced Back to
Time of the Roman Conquest
of England.

the

COLOMBIAN ORGAN
TO BE SUPPLANTED

New

Instrument Is Being Constructed
and Will Be Placed in Hill
Auditorium.

Because the advent of soccer has
met with much favor at the hands of
i higan students, facts, dealing with
its history and evolution, have been
collected.
All forms of football can be traced
to the one source, a game brought to-
England by the conquering Romans,
r d learned by them from the Greeks.
Nothing definite was recorded until
several hundred years later when men-
tion is. made of a game held yearly on,
Shrove Tuesday at Chester, in com-
memoration of the kicking about of
the head of a captured Dane. At this
same time writings tell of a similar
game on the same date at Derby in
annual celebration of a victory over
the Romans.
During the reign of Edward III,
fottball became a very popular
sport among the middle and lower
classes. It never seems to have been
taken up by the aristocracy, as were
the later games, cricket, golf and ten-
nis. In 1349, a public edict was issued,
prohibiting it as interfering with the
progress of archery, which was ne-
glected for the sake of the more ex-
citing football.
The popularity of the game gradual-
ly waned, until the first part of the
nineteenth century, when it was re-
vived by adoption in the schools. So
many different ways of playing sprang
up in this century, that in 1863, a
commission was formed to classify and
make rules for them. The chief result
of their work wAs to separate the game
into rugby and association football.
The game played generally in the
United States is only a modification
of the first division and soccer is
merely another name for the second.
Soccer first assumed importance in
this country in 1905, when a crack
English team toured Canada and the
States. Now it is played in many of
our cities and by the Eastern and
Western universities. Critics of sport
have ventured to predict that the time
is not far distant when it will battle
with bazeball and football for supra-
macy in the public interest.

With the passing of University Hall
as the scene of the larger campus as-
semblages, the historic. Columbian or-
gan will also go.
For 20 years the present organ has
been a source of pleasure to the uni-
versity and Ann Arbor public, being
brought here in 1893 from the World's
Fair. At that time it was the finest
organ in existence, but two decades
have seen rapid changes in the art of
organ construction; and it is to take
advantage of these recent improve-
ments that the board of regents has
decided to install in Hill Auditorium a
new instrument.
The Columbian organ is not to pass
entirely out of exjstence, however,
as certain parts of it will be used in
theconstructionof the new instrument,
which is to be built by the Hutchings
Organ Company, of Boston, Mass. This
concern has constructed some of the'
finest organs in the country, among
which those in Symphony Hall,
Boston, and Woolsey Hall, at Yale
University.
Some of the important features of
the specifications for the new organ,
decided upon by' Prof. A. A. Stanley,
are radical changes from the older
organ. There will be six distinct divi-
sions, viz., great, swell, choir, solo,
echo, and pedal. The key-desk, or
console, which will be movable, will.
be connected with the pipes by
an electric cable. The pipes will
number 4008, and will, vary from
32 feet to a fraction of an inch
in length. There will be 70 stops, but
32 couplers will increase the number,
of combinations. Twenty-eight push-
buttons and 12 adjustable pedal com-
binations will make easy the manipula-
tion. A complete set of cathedral
chimes, a harp, and two vox humanas
are the most noteworthy stops. The
echo organ will be placed in a remote
part of the auditorium to give the
distance effect. The action will be
electro-pneumatic, and a large fan
blower will furnish the wind, under
heavy pressure.
Every invention and improvement of

Siply Tiike the iroubie to Itin-
guish Poisonous From Edible
Varieties.
Death resulting from eating mush-
rooms is easily avoidable, if the mush-
roon eaters take care to know the 30
deadly poisonous varieties. The cause
of poisoning lies in the fact that those
who .eat them know only a few non-
poisonous species.
According to Prof. C. H. Kauffman,
of the botanical department, there are
700 species of mushrooms in Michigan
of the common type having cap, gills,
and stem; not including the puff-balls
and other fungi. It is therefore im-
practical for the amateur to attempt
to become familiar with the edible
species, but he might easily learn to
recognize the deadly poisonous ones
which make all the trouble.
Prof. Kauffman has been working
for the past five years on a monograph
for the state biological survey upon
the mushroons of Michigan. The re-
sults of :his work are as applicable to
the section of the country north of the
Ohio and east of the Mississippi rivers,
as to Michigan.
PERFECTS A. THINCI I MACHINE.
C. L. Hull, '13, Invents Contrivance
that Reasons Mechanically,.
Logical reasoning reduced to me-
chanical accuracy is the result claim-
ed for a contrivance recently invented
by C. L. Hull, '13. The machine is so
devised that it will check one's major
and minorpremises in a syllogism, and
obtain the inevitable conclusion. The.
operator, so to speak, drops his prem-
ises into the machine, adjusts certain
elements of the mechanism, and out
comes the result, as nice as you please.
And you haven't had to rack your
brain for an hour or two to get it.'
Not only can a logical conclusion be
obtained, but a fallacy can be detected
with ease. This is due to the fact that
the machine will not illustrate an il-
logical conclusion, or, in other words,
(Contitued on page 4.)
modern art and science has been in-
corporated in the plans of the new or-
gan, and when its construction is com-
pleted, Michigan will again have the
finest pipe organ in the country.

1=1 l Ui 1 1 S
RECEIVE N
FACULTY

NOTABLE MEN WILL AT
RECEPTION TO BE TENi
FORTY-TWO MEMBERS
TEACHING FORCE APPO
THIS YEAR.

a

BE CAREFUL, END YOU
ME .FROM EFAFIGII

.

Regents Promote T
,Junior, and Ass

Forty-two new members of th
versity faculty will be guests of
at the senate reception to be
in Barbour gymnasium Tuesday
ing. Among the new professo
instructors are several men
markable reputations who are
throughout the country as lead
their profession.
Among the most prominent o
is Horace W. King, profess
hydraulic engineering. For
years Mr. King has been an en
of the United States gov~ernme:
1895 he was appointed draugh
for the U. S, surveyor general a
son, Ariz. Three years later h
charge of the surveying of th
posed Nicaraugua canal site. I
he worked on the construction i
bors in the Philippines as a m
of the provincial board. As ri
tial engineer, he served the C
Honkow railroad in China frox
to 1903. After giving up his w
China, he held the position of
ant engineer in Manilla and wa
put in charge of reclamation w
the western part of the United
WIlliam C. Hoad, professor o
tary engineering, had charge
reconstruction of the sewage sys
Flint during the past year. Pi
to that time he was engineer
Kansas state board of health
more than a year he studied s
problems in Boston as guest
Massachusetts .Institute of Te
ogy.

Lewis M. Gram,
tural engineering,
(Continued

professor o
recently d
on page 4.)

_ _ . .

I

0

hZb

u

b

111111 1 mummum

Oct. 28, 29, 30, 31
Nov. 1 and 2

Old ArmoryWe
Huron St.
Next to Waiting Room

TO

BE

GIVEN

AWAY

FREE

WITH 10e ADMISSION TICKET

1913-FO -5

Passenger

Touring Car

Zhe Fair will open tomorrow evenifl

Free concerts every night--Shows of all descriptions--Something doing all the time
COME AND H A V E A G O O D T I ME

No.hn

Over

Ten

Cent

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