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April 05, 1913 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-04-05

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.0

LOCAL $1.50
MAIL $"x.00

The

Michigan

Daily

ILOCAL $1.50
MAIL $2.00I

II, No. 133.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SATURDAY, APRIL 5, 1913.

PRICE FIVE CENTS

____..
t

Y HOPES

I

I

I

THE WEATHER MAN

I

THOUSANDS TRY TO TRAVEL
FEW FIND FATE FAVORABLE

.........._
t

WILL OBTAIN
NO VACATION
"Sieve" Farrell to Keep Iis Proteges
dI<l<>;ii g All Week in an Effort
t oifa lv(inniiig Qi uairtets
AtPenn.
PROSPECTS ARE PiV T FOR
IEVAINING LOST LAURELS
A Few FredinmIan uhInners Will Also
, wt esert Ferry Field
Cinders.

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Saturday,
the old prophet is longing for a vaca-
tion; he beat it early this morning,
but left a note saying it would be fair
and warmer.
University .(Observatory -Friday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 37.8; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preced-
ing, 46.9; minimum temperature 24
hours preceding, 33.7; average wind
velocity 14 miles per hour.
BASEBALL NINE TO
PLAY IN LEXINGTON

MADDENED MOB MAKES
IN RUNNING ROUND
MAKE TRAINS.

MELEEt
TO

on the east-bound track, a train for
the west had the nerve to pull in on
the further side. "Oh my goodness,
how in the world will I ever reach
that train with all my baggage. I
wish I had left my heavy dress at the
house" wails one poor co-ed. "I am
going to vote for woman's suffrage
now" pipes another. The crowd tried

Trunks and suitcases, umbrella,
and raincoats, taxis and cabs, trains
and smoke, some rain and less sun-

shine greeted the gaze of homeward to pass through the near east train to
bound students at the Michigan Cen- reach 'the Chicago bound flier. After,

WOMEN'S RECEPTION RAISES
RELIEF FUND TO $500.00
Dr. James B. Angell and President
Harry B. Hutchins were the guests of
honor at the reception tendered the
Schoolmasters' club and Collegiate
Alumnae *in Barbour gymnasium
Thursday night by the university
women. The toasts prepared for the
cancelled banquet were not given as
the committee desired to make the af-
fair as informal as possible.
The ticket sale for the reception
raised the relief fund to the pledged
$500.
BOOKS FOR 1914'
OPERA UE MAY I
Five Manuscripts Hae Already Been
Submitted and lMany Others.
Are Expected.

Students Who Responded to.
lelp Kept Busy Entire
i)ragglng Rive in
Relay Shifts.

Call For
Day

SEARCH FOR
BODIES STILL
UNSUCCESSFUL

No rust will be allowed to accum-
ulate op1 the shower faucets in the
Ferry field club house during the
spring recess, as Trainer Farrell will
keep the Varsity and fresh relay hopes
hustling all week, in an effort to send
three. winning quartets into the field
of eastern co petition on the occasion
of the Pennsylvania classic.
* Some notes of despondency are evi-
dent in the tones of "Steve" when he
reviews the treatment that he and his
track team have received at the hands
of the weather czar. The business of
getting his men into condition on the
out -door track has progressed at a
crawl gait, the men being forced
to eke out brief moments of practice
between showers of rain. Because of
the piresent backward shape of the
relay candidates the trainer consid-
ers it imperative that every day from
now on be utilized, and has requested
all w th ambitions for relay places to
remain in Ann Arbor.
Despite all set backs, that satisfied
smile still continues to illumine the
countenance of the veteran trainer
when the prospects of a mile relay
victory are brought to his attention.
Haff, Craig, Baier, and Plummer, who
are the men mentioned most frequent-
ly in connection with the makeup of
this squad, are all intending to stay
over for the vacation practice. In ad-
dition there are several other aspic-
ants who will lend their bit' to the
creation of a little competition for
the final berths.
Practically the same situation ex-
ists in the two mile event as in the
mile, with the four men that seem
most certain of being in the final
4hoice, staying to reap the advantage
of the week's training. These four
men of proved prowess in the half
nmle run are Haimbaugh, Carver,,
Brown and Jansen. It will be a sur-
prise to some, to learn that Smith, the
miler will also last himself among the
candidates for the two nile team and
will stay over.
Although a few of the freshmen re-
lay runners failed to see the necessi-
ty for staying, the outlook is not so
dark that it lacks its redeeming fea-
lures as there will be four or five of
the verdants for the trainer to work
with that have shown ability in the
440 sprint. C. B. Smith, Catlett, Darn-
al and Gorare. will not desert the Fer-
ry field cinders.
MRS. LADDEY OF STUTTGART,
GERMANY, TO TALK HERE.
Mrs. Clara S. Laddey, of Stuttgart,
Germany, will speak this evening al
7:30 o'clock in the Ann Arbor high
school auditorium on "Die Bewegung
im Lichte der Dichtung."
Mrs. Laddey is one of the most bril-
liant woman speakers in the country,
and large audiences have greeted he;
everywhere. It is expected that all
students who understand German will
attend.'
Prof. John W. Scholl, of the German
faculty, will preside at the lecture
which will be free to the public.
BRIDGE PLAYERS CONTRACT
CASE OF "LES PIEDS FROIDS"

Recent Floods Will Not
Opening Game With U.
Kentucky.

Prevent
of

BARIBEAU WILL DO SLAB DUTY.
' .y
Dispatches received from the Mich-
igan baseball team at Cincinnati en
route for Lexington, state that the
roadbeds are in passable shape, so
that Rickey's pupils will reach their
destination in time to play the sched-
uled contest with the University of
Kentucky, this afternoon. This allays
the fears of the local athletic author-
ities who were not able to predict the
effect that the recent floods would
have on the route mapped out for the
southern trip.
While it is not known definitely
who will be on the mound for the
Wolverines in their opening game, and
probably Rickey himself will not de-
cide finally until on the field where
he can judge the conditions more ac-
curately, it would seem reasonable to
select Baribeau as the man on whom
the choice will fall. Sisler will be out
in the right garden if not selected
for box duty as his presence is needed
in the batting order. Rogers will of
course be on the receiving end.
McQueen will probably hold down
the first bag, as Pontius is slightly ill,
and will not be used in the first gam-
es. Duncanson will be at his old
stand at second and Lavans will be at
home in the shortstop's locality. The
remaining infield job will probably be
delegated to Baker, as he is not only
adept in covering the third sack, but
is strong with the stick.
In the outfield only one position is
definitely assigned, and that is center
field to Capt. Bell. The choice for the
two other fielders will probably be
made from Corey Sisler, and Sheehy.
DRINK MAUSOLEUM TO FLOW
Campus thirst will be alleviated
after vacation by turning on the wat-
er in the 1911 class memorial drink-
ing fountain near the library. After
standing since last summer with not a
drop of water, as a memorial to thirs-
ty mortals, cobwebs are being cleared
away, and the pipes are being laid
connecting the drink mausoleum with
the main system.
Supt. James H. Marks stated yester-
day that water will flow from the
fountain soon after vacation. Connec-
tions were not made sooner on ac-
count of the impracticability of using'
the, watering station during the win-
ter.
NEWBERRY HALL TEA ROOM IS
POPULAR WITH VISITORS.
Newberry hall this week has turned1
its tea room into a restaurant to ac-
commodate the influx .of visitors1
brought here by the meetings of the
Schoolmasters' club. About 100 extrai
guests have been served at the noon
lunches and at dinner. Special ban-,
quet tables were placed in the parlors
to increase the seating capacity.
The a la carte service proved so1
popular that the rooms were kepti
open an additional hour and a halfi
from 5:00 o'clock until 6:30 o'clock.
A candy sale also was held in the;
corridor every day for the women's
relief fund, over $10 being realized.
The room will reopen after the
spring recess on the old schedule,
serving small order lunches from noon.
until 1:00 o'clock and from 3:00 until
5:00 o'clock in the afternoon.

tral yesterday afternoon. Two hours
before the trains were due to leave,
slim female forms could be seen be-
tween the tiers of trunks seeking in
vain the elusive baggage-master, who
with a rose in his button-hole and a
scowl behind his black cigar, was
dodging all humanity.
With the arrival of the train an aw-
ful scramble for the cars was made.
Suit cases were hurled onto the plat-
forms of the coaches, followed by a
small wad of skirt and a spring bon-
net. Men did the 100 yard dash up the
plank walk in order to get that seat
that they saw vacant in the twelfth
coach forward. This mad rush for
shelter was not for the means of pro-
curing a mere 2x4 space in which to
rest in comfort, but to put the male
of the species in a way to be of service
to the ladies and hence increase the
social circulation upon their return to
the university.
While this melee was in progress

16 people have crowded into the nar-
row passage way a porter declared
that it was impossible to get through
there.
Seventeen different kind of scowls
were counted upon the countenances
of these repulsed voyagers. At this
time the load of human freight going
toward Boston pulled out and a scam-
per for the quickest route to the
Windy City was inaugurated.
Each component of the mob took
just two and one half steps toward
this second train, for it was swiftly
passing from Ann Arbor territory.
Two athletes managed to board, the
"ground eater" but the bulk of stu-
dents had to "stick."
Last reports confirm the fact that
there are only five trunks left at the
depot waiting to be sent after their
flurried owners.. A heavy sigh and
the shifting of the station agent's cud
proclaim that another exodus of va-
cationists has been faithfully handled.

WILL

GIVE OUT TEST

LYRICS.I

DECLARES HIGH
SCHOOLS MUST
BE DEMOCRATIC
Luther Wright Tells Schoolmasters'
Club That They Should Come
More Closely Into Touch
With the Problems
of Life.
"The schools of the future must be
more democratic," said Luther - L:
Wright, superintendent of public in-
struction before the general meeting
of the Schoolmasters' club in Univer-
sity Hall yesterday. "They must come
more closely into touch with the prob-
lems of life. From the point of view
of the business man and the citizen
the function of the high school is three
fold; first, to give the pupil a train-
ing that will aid him in making a liv-
ifig; second, to give culture that he
may enjoy living; third, to so train
his intelligence that he shall be a good
citizen.
"I believe that the present high
school needs readjustment; it should
know from the beginning to what use
its product is to be put. What we
call a general education is not of great
practical use nowadays. The idea of
teaching a little bit of everything to

CLASSHEADS
PLAN UNIFORM
HONORSYSTEM
Presidents Will Work Out Composite
Scheme From Those of Other
Schools; Idea Receives
Support of Several
Classes.
Presidents of the variops, classes on
the campus are now planning an hon-
or system for use in examinations,
which they intend shall be a compos-
ite of all the best systems now in use
in other univ.ersities, and, when com-
pleted, they will present the plan for
the consideration of their classes.
At their meeting at the Michigan
Union recently, Ralph M. Snyder,
reporting for the drafting committee,
explained the method which the com-
mittee has followed in outlining their
plan, and several minor details were
discussed at some length, such as a
compulsory "tattling clause," which
was voted down. No definite plan will
be completed and presented by the
committee until after the spring vaca-
tion.
The committee has applied for and
received complete details of honor sys-
tems now in use in the Carnegie In-
stitute in Pittsburg, Yale, and Prince-
ton, and has also been in touch with
former students of . Leland Stanford
and other universities where the
scheme is used. The plan is to give
Michigan the benefit of the experience
these other institutions have had, and
evolve as near an ideal plan as it is
possible to work out. The committee

Books for the 1914 Michigan Union
opera are due on May 1. Five books
have already been handed in, and it is
definitely known that other students
are working on manuscripts. Those
which have been received so far have
not been examined and will not be
looked over until after the time for
submission, when all books will be.in.
A number of the men who entered
the competition this year are known
ton be working on the 1914 show. The
successful .writer will be chosen by a
committee consisting of faculty and
students, the faculty representatives
being Professors F. N. Scott, A. A.
Stanley and L. A. Strauss.
Immediately after spring vacation
test lyrics, written by Robert Beck,
'13L, author of "Contrarie Mary," will
be given out to tho'se who are plan-
ning to write music for the 1914 opera.
They will cover various styles of mu-
sic and the committee will thus be
able to get a line on the men who are
capable cf undertaking the writing.
As soon after May 1 as possible the
successful author of the book will be
announced and at the same time the
men who are to write the music
will be selected. This will allow prac-
tically a month before summer vaca-
tion, during which the music writers
can start their work, and as usual
they will spend the summer in per-
fecting it.,
The general chairman for next
year's opera will be announced shortly
after President Kemp returns from
his trip with the glee club.
"BYS" DRAW TOM TO CAMPUS
Tom Lovell is moving today. To
be nearer the campus and the 'bys,
Tom has rented the second floor of
the cleaning establishment next to the
Congregational church with a front
window permitting a direct line of
vision to the campus.
As soon as he gets settled he will
be at home to customers and visitors
at all hours. A huge sign across the
front of the building will herald Tom's
name to the campus both as a cob-
bler and dispenser of poetry and sim-
ple philosophy.
WILL EXHIBIT WORKS OF
PROMINENT "LIFE" ARTIST.
Works of Orsen Lowell, one of
'Life's" principal artists, will be ex-
hibited in Memorial hall beginning
April 22. The exhibit will be given
under the auspices of the Ann Arbor
art association and will be open to the
public.1
The exhibits will contain the.origi-
nals of some of "Life's" biggest hits
as well as numerous snatches from
the sketch book of the artist showing
the evolution of many of his best
known works.
"EVERYMANl WILL APPEAR
IN UNIVERSITY HALL SOON.
Miss Edith Wynne Mathieson, sup-
ported by a company o0 Ben Greet's
English players, will appear at Uni-
versity Hall April 18 or 19 in "Ev-
eryman" under the auspices of the
English department.
Miss Mathieson is especially, noted
(Continued on page 4).

DYNAMITE NOT TO BE USED
WITH PRESENT HIGH WATER
Additional Working Material Secured
By Prof. Johnson.. Men of
Experience Needed.
More than 50 students responded to
the call issued for help in the work by
Prof. C. E. Johnston, and these men
were kept busy in relay shifts during
the entire day. Prof. Johnston ex-
pressed his approval of the re-
sponse his call met with, and stated
that he could use the service of all
men who would come out during
vacation.
"I want men particularly who know
how to handle boats and can swim,"
said Prof. Johnston. "We are going
to extend the search and more -men
are badly needed. The temperature of
the water increases the difficulty of
our task, and, the great volume of
water due to the heavy rains is re-
tarding our work to some extent. I
do not think the water will go down
until about Monday from present in-
lications, and till then we shall
progress slowly."
The apparatus used in the' search
is being augmented daily by new addi-
tions. Three large row boats from
Whitmore Lake were in use yesterday
along with three 20 foot chains bear-
ing great hooks which grappled debris
from the river bed. Only fragments
:f trees and other refuse were lifted
to the surface by this procedure.
Chief of Police Apfel stated that the
use of dynamite would not be resort-
ed to until the river showed some
signs of abating.
Rumor that a reward would be of-
fered to stimulate interest in the re-
covery of the bodies has not been
substantiated by the city or county
authorities.
A great deal of speculation has de-
veloped as to the effect the cold tem-
perature of the river water would
have on the bodies. Opinions vary,
and much discussion has been arous-
ed.
"The cold temperature of the Huron
water will preserve the bodies," said
Dean Vaughan. "If the water was
warm decomposition would set rin
quicker. The present temperature of
the water will retard the bodies from
rising as soon as they would if the
water was warmer."
STATE SENATE TO DISCUSS
STUDENT FRANCHISE BiLL.
Strong Support Gives Promise of Its
Favorable Consideration
Next Thursday.
The question of the enfranchise-
ment of students whose homes are in
Michigan, will be discussed by the
senate at Lansing next Thursday.
Favorable action by that body seems
assured by present indications. The
Progressive party is strongly en-
trenched in the Michigan legislature,
and will no doubt support the bill.
The state papers are also backing the
measure by publishing a number of
editorials that were prepared by the
committee which originally drew up
the bill.
These editorials maintain, respect-
ively, that the bill is a sound progres-
sive measure; that it purposes the en-
franchisement of citizens who are es-
pecially competent to vote, and who
have hitherto lost the right or privi-
lege given them by their state consti-
tution; and finally that the ultimate
passage of the bill, entitling students
to vote by mail, will materially les-
sen the tendency of political parties
to bribe students whom they send
home to vote.

Library to be Open During Vacation.
The general library will be open
during vacation at the usual ho'irs.

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everybody, in a certain
time needs correction."

prescribedI

Many recent innovations in several
of the school systems throughout the
state, and a number of proposals for
meeting the increasing requirements
for university entrance, formed the
subject matter for the various lectur-
es, addresses, and discussions which

took place in the different assemblies is anxious to hear from other students
at the last session of the club yester- who may have had experience with
day. -urkings of the system anywhere.
Prof. John R. Brumm, of the rhet-, That the proposed institution of an
oric department, in speaking to the honor system at Michigap is receiv-
English conference, emphasized the ing attention on the campus is evi-
fact that the literature which is giv- dent in the recent action of Triangles,
entohigh school pupils to read should a junior engineering society, on the
be such as will fit in with their pre- subject. The engineers voted to go
vious training, and that the present on record as emphatically in favor of
tendency of selecting the literature an honor system similar to that which
merely on the basis of meeting the has been used recently by several
college requirements does not devel- classes on the campus.
op the pupil's appreciation and love Prof. U. B. Phillips' class in colonial
of the classics to the extent that a se- history made use of the honor plan
lection on the former basis would. In at a mid-semester examination Wed-
the course of his lecture he stated nesday morning for the first time.
that the college freshman when he Prof. Phillips has had much experi-
arrives on the campus knows little if ence with the system in other places
anything about the writing of correct and is highly enthusiastic over it. He
English and that he is sometimes un- says he sees no reason why thel
able to distinguish between a complete scheme would not work as well herej
sentence and a dependent clause. as it has at other universities. The
Principal E. E. Gallup of the .plan used in his class was a written
Adrian high school told the commer- pledge at the close of the student's
cial conference about an employment- bluebook that he had neither given
(Continued on page 4). (Continued on page 4).

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