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April 02, 1913 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-04-02

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$1.50I

The

Michigan

Daily

LOCAL $1.00

MAIL $2.00

I

P I

E_

y

T

NO. 10.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, APRIL 2, 1913.

PRICE FIVB 'CENTS

---- - --

:NTS ARE

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'i I

I

THE WEATHER MAN

I

TED TO

URON

C.T. Johnston Chosen by Univer-
ty to Assume Charge of Work;
Has Organized Squads to
Drag River.
ND HAVEN MEN HAVE
HARGE OF FURTHER SEARCH
Think That Bodies of Drowned
Have Been Carried Below
. The Dam.

Forecast for Ann Arbor-Wednes-
day fair, moderate temp'erature, mod-
erate southwest winds.
University Observatory-Tuesday,
7:00 p. m., temperature 46.0; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding
54.4; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding, 34.0; average wind velocity
13 miles per hour.
MAY 8 IS PICKED FOR SWING.
OUT BY SENIOR PRESIDENTs
President Emeritus Angell May Speak,
Eercises to Be Held in
University Hall.

FLOOD HORRORS
ARE DESCRIBED
BYWITNESS
Letter to Student From Piqua Tels of
Many Harrowing Scenes
During Days of
Tragedy.
SAYS HOUSES WERE HURLED
TO SIIREI$ A1ANST llhI1DGE
Every House Had Sufferers; Terrific
Thunderstorm Does Added
Damage..

CANE DAY IS
PLANNED BY
1913CLASSES
Senior Committees Favor Inaugura.-
tioni of New ('iii o: Plan
Parade Siuihar to
winlg-olt.
FOUR CLASMES INCLUIDED IN
MOVEMENT FOR FUNCTION.
%'IairmanEii of Lit Coninitfee Suggests
'I'jt 'Stnt Feature
Promenade.

Editor, Michigan Daily:-.-
There seems to be sucft a genera
misunderstanding as to rules of the
:Michigan Union governing dancing
that a statement of the Union polic
seems called for.
When the Union some time ago abol
ished certain objectionable forms o
dancing, generally described as th
"clutch hold," and, also, put the tango
under the ban at the regular Satur-
day evening assemblies, it was intend-
ed that this regulation should apply
only to Saturday evening assemblies.
Chief among the reasons for
taking this action were that
with the hall crowded, as it us
ually is Saturday evenings, the tango
is a nuisance, and, also, the regula-
tions for dancing in mixed gatherings,
such as the Saturday evening assem-
blies ought to be more strict.
When private clubs andhsocieties
hire the hall for a dance, the Union
insists that they have a chaperon..
They choose their own chaperones and
make their own regulations. In other
words, the policy and the regulations
governing the Saturday evening danc-
es apply only to parties under . the
direct control of the Union.
(Signed) EDWARD G. KEMP.

al
e
ag
'y
ze
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)-

COM3iUICATIONS.

DEFEAT STILL
MEETS SEARCH
FORVICTIM
Desperate Efforts of Seekers and
Diver Are Futile in Attempt
to Recover Bodies
of Drowned.

CL0ITIH N G
SO-1E

AND SHOE-FOUNI1
ISTANCE FROM[ S(

Rel aives Will, Remai Until
Are Located; Crowd
Haunts Spot.

D)

rof. C.T. Johnston, O' the engineer
department, has been appointed b
university to assume control o
dragging of the river for the bod
of, the drowning victims. He wa
fled of the appointment yesterda
Secretary Shirley W. Smith, and a
e left for the scene of the disaster
rof. Johnston, who 'is the directo
lie summer engineering camp, ha
nized the students of the survey
classes into groups for the pur
of dragging the .bed of the Huron
work was commenced yesterda
rnoon, and the river between th
and the old bridge was explored
e work of dragging the rest o
river will be done under the direc-
of a band of 10 students from
id Haven, according to an an-
icement made by Prof. Johnston
evening, The Grand Haven stu-
s, all experienced in searching for
ned persons in Lake Michigan,
n the labor at 4:30 o'clock yes-
y morning, and they have thor-
ly searched the river from the
on dam to the old pine situated
at the old dam. Today they plan
>mplete, if possible, the dragging
e dam below the boat house.
er studying the current, J. W.
ison, '14, one of the students en-
d. in the search, stated that it was
pinion of the Grand Haven men,
owing to the almost incredible
ness of the current, the bodies
been carried below the dam near
oat house. "However," he declar-
we are taking no chances, but
explore the banks with pike poles,
:he bed with grappling irons, all
vay down. The current was so
that the diver wa forced to al-
liimself to be pulled back when
d traveled downstream, so I can-
ee how the bodies could remain
the second dam,"
BETA PI INITIATES
FIFTEEN MEN TONIGHT.
rary Engineering Society Ban-
quets at Union; Faculty and
Students Speak.
:ording to the annual custom, 15
r engineers will be initiates of
Beta Pi, honorary society of the
eering department, tonight.
lowing the initiation a banquet
e held at the Union. James Fol-
ill act as toastmaster. 1B. H.
s will speak in behalf of the
nen and toasts will be givgn by
G. W. Patterson, A. H. White,
; J. Tilden. Other speakers wll
Weaver, '13E, and H. 0. David-
ker State Students to Smoke.
card party smoker" will be in-
3ed by the Illini club at the
gan Union tomorrow evening. No
ies will be made. An admissioi
cents will be charged.
and Parmics to DanceTonight.
sh dents and fresh pharmics will
i combined dance at Granger's
mny tonight at 8:30 o'clock. The

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y
If
A
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Senior swing-out this year will come
on Thursday, May 8, and the exercises
preceding the annual promenade will
be held in University Hall. The date
was decided at a meeting of senior
class presidents Monday.
The speakers have not yet been en-
gaged but probably President-Emeri-
tus James B. Angell will give his cus-
tomary .address to the; near-grads.
TEACHERS- TO. HEAR
NOTED LECTURERS
cicntistIs and dIc nfA li . Addre s<
High School Inst:eors
TI:Is N eN T
MEETINGS OPEN TO STUDENTS

More harrowing details of the de-
vastation of the flood stricken cities
in Ohio were made known yesterday in
a letter sent from Piqua to one of the
students fron that place by his moth-
er.
The letter was written Sunday, reach-
ing here yesterday morning, and dis-
closes some of the horrors that the
survivors were forced to endure, the
nature of the rescue work, and the ex-
tent of the damage. The letter fol-
lows:,
"Oh, I don't know where to begin to
write. We are safe. No damage done.
They had a row boat at our dining
room..Mr. C. the engineer, took us up
the hill above Hydrolic in a box car.
I took two boys who had lost par-
ents. Later we found them. Tuesday
we had started several times for
Crows hill but could not make it.
B. is in bad shape. Lost much. He
brought bushel baskets full of sweat-;
ers, shirts, etc. I washed and dried
them, then took them to the Y. M. C.,
A.
All lights were out. A terrible
thunderstorm Monday night burnt outf
ours. The textile mill where J. workss
(Continued on page 4.)
SQUAD GETS INTO
SHAPE FOR TRIP

An all university Cane Day, to be
inaugurated soon after the spring re-
cess will be' the latest addition to
Michigan customs it the plans prppos-
cd by the carious cane committees
reach maturity. The event will prob-
ably consist of a parade similar in
some respects to swing-out, with all
seniors in the departments, wearing
the walking sticks, participating. No
definite date can yet be set, however,
as all the consignments of canes have
not arrived.
According to present indications on-
, ly the literary, engineering, law and
dent departments will be represented
as these are the only ones who have
adopted the cane as a senior emblem.
Chairmen of the committees in these
departments are enthusiastic over the
idea and there is little doubt but that
the event will take place.
"Cane Day is an excellent idea,"
said Morley Griswold, '13, chairman of
the literary committee, "and I am
doing all in my power to make it a
reality. I hope we can have a parade
around the campus with members of
ea;h department giving some 'stunt'
as they pass their respective depart-,
ment"

Untiring wprk on the part of htun=
dreds of volunteer; searchers and an
experienced diver. proved of no avail
yesterday in the hunt .for the victims
of Sunday's triple drowning. Night-
fall did not bring defeat; only the'
postponement of efforts which reopen-
ed with increased zeal early this

1914 WOMEN READY
FOR ANNUAL PLAY
Dress ltR-earsal Last Night Put Final
Toluch on the "Realm of Dreams"
and "lD.dy Life
TIEKETS HAVE A RAPID SALE.
With the final dress rehearsal in
Barbour syrm last eveaing,junior wom-
en l=ut the finishing touches on. the
two o "The Realm fc Dreams".and
"aily Lie' w hich will be presented
tonigh t and tomorrow evening in Sar-
ah Caswell Angell hall. Steady training
for two months under the direction of
Mr. Hlerbert L. Kenyon has brcught the

i
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t
r
o>

When the high school teachers of the
state gather here on Wednesday,
Thursday and Friday for the annual
meetings of the Schoolmasters' club
and the Michigap Academy of Science,

noted educators with national reputa-
tions, prominent scientific investiga-
tors, and many professors of the uni-
versity will lecture before their gen-
eral meetings and conference assem-
blies.
Prof. Karl Bezold, coming here from
the University of Heidelberg, Germa-
ny, will give two lectures for the bene-
fit of the visiting teachers. He will
speak on "The Industrial Arts of the
Ancient Orient,"at 4:15 o'clock Thurs-
day afternoon in the lecture room of
the Economics building, and on Fri-
day afternoon he will lecture at the
same time and place on "The Religious
Art of the Ancient Orient."
Dr. C. J. Chamberlain, of Chicago
University, who had charge of a bo-
tanical expedition which made various
investigations in Mexico, will lecture
in the physics laboratory tomorrow
evening at 8:00 o'clock an~d will tell
something about his various experi-
ences.
At the general meeting in Universi-
ty Hall on Thursday morning at 9:30
o'clock, Prof. M. A. Bigelow of Colum-
bia University Teachers' College will
lecture on "High School Biological
Sciences as Related to Human Life."
Prof. D. C. Miller of the Case Scien-
tific will give his well-known lecture
on sound waves in University Hall at
8:00 o'clock in the .vening. He will
tell how to photograph and analyze
the waves and will bring with him his
gold flute in order to use'it in the va-
rious demonstrations which he will
give. The editor of the New York
"Nation," Mr. Paul E. Moore will lec-
ture Friday evening in University
Hall. His subject will be "The Para-
dox of Oxford."
, The association of high school prin
cipals will meet this evening in room
B-8 'of the high school and will dis-
cuss in an informal way the different
phases of their administrative work.
Prof. Mark Bailey of J(alamazoo col-

WORK IS BEGUN
AT FERRY FIELD

Diamond Players Nearly Ready For
First Game Saturday; Final
Team Not Picked.
LEAVE FOR LEXINGTON FRIDAY,
Primed for either outdoor or indoor
work, Michigan's Varsity baseball}
squad is putting in its last hard licks
of practice before the squad journeys
southward for the annual spring com-1
petition with the Dixie college nines.
If real spring atmosphere abounds,
as it did yesterday, Ferry field will be
the scene of their gambols, but if the
weather is inclement, the Varsity dia-
mond exponents will be penned in the
Waterman gymnasium cage.
Coach Branch Rickey has narrowed
his squad down to almost final form,
and on this week's showing the def-
inite selection of men to make the
southern jaunt will be based. Four-
teen players will probably be chosen
to wear the Michigan uniforms on the
trip, but this number may be varied
at the last minute at the coach's dis-
cretion. Critics who have watched the
weeding out process believe that
Rickey will select fourteen men, and
that fourteen will be chosen from the
following list of players:
Pitchers-Sisler, Quaintance, Bari-
beau, and Metcalf.
Catchers-Rogers,Hippler,and Web-
ber.
First base-Pontius, Stewart, and
McQueen.;
Second base-Duncanson and Hug-f

WiIth the Exception of High Jumpers
and Pole Vaulters All Athletes
Leave Gym.
WINNING RELAY TEAM EXPECTED
Provided with the first permanent
signs of outdoor weather, Varsity and
fresh track candidates responded to
the call of trainer Farrell for Ferry
field practice. Only the hiih-jumpers
and pole vaulters failed to put in their
appearance as they must remain in
the gym until the landing pits have
dried sufficiently to admit of their use.
From all present indications, it' is
certain that Michigan will be repre-
sented at the Pennsylvania relays by
mile and two mile teams. The project
of taking a four mile quartet instead of
the two mile has finally been abandon-
ed because of the impossibility of find-
ing four efficient milers.
Several years in the past Michigan has
invaded the east with a mile squad
that on paper seemed to have first
honors at the Franklin field classic
nailed down securely. The situation
will be the same this year as trainer
Farrell has developed a quartet of
440 men that if judged by comparative
records, seem the superior of the
East. Haff,.Baier, Craig, and possibly
Plummer will constitute the mile
team.
Ferry field will by no means present
a deserted appearance during the
spring holidays as Trainer Farrell
will ask all the relay men, including
the freshmen, to stay over and put in
their time getting into shape for Penn
relays on April 26.
BRIDGE TOURNAIMENT TEANS

plays to a point insuring productions
of a high class.
The number of' tickets is limited and
women wishing to attend should pro-
cure admission cards immhediately at
the table in the east corridor o the
general library. Tickets have a' eady
met ,with a rapid sale but several re-
main for both performances.
With specially designed scenery and
costumes the plays are ready for the
boards. The music, most of which was
written by Earle V. Moore contains
several hits some of which will be
featured by quartets. Other features
will be introduced including a fancy
dancing number. Both plays were
written by junior women.
HICHIGAN UNION I)ANCES TO
CONTINUE DURING VACATION'
Regular membership dances will be
held at the Union on the two Satur-
day nights during spring vacation.
They will be conducted on the same
plan as the dances during the. semes-
ter.
Tickets will go on sale for this
week's dance tomorrow afternoon at,
5:00 o'clock as usual and for nextE
week Thursday April 10, at 5:00}

morning.
The river was thoroughly searched-
from the fatal tail race to the ' old
bridge, by scores of students in ca-
noes with grappling irons attached,
while the race ittelf and the chambers
under the power house were explored
by the diver,. The seekers were not
forced to return empty handed, as sev-
eral pieces of clothing worn - by the
victims of the calamity were found.
Find Clothing in River.
The coats of the two students were
picked up about a quarter-of a mile
down the river from the scene of the
tragedy, and an oxford shoe, worn by
Crandall was picked 'up about a hun-
dred yards from the railroad bridge.
they were at once identified by rela-
tives of the victims, who were on"the
scene. Also a Thermos bottle, that
had been in the canoe, was discovered
about 200 yards from the spot where
the frail craft was overturned.
Relatives of the victims were on
the scene early yesterday, remaining
until the last canoe had returned to
the boat house. Crandall's father ar-
rived Monday night, and Bacon's two
younger brothers were on the river all
day, while an uncle of Miss Rysdorp
led one of the parties engaged in drag-
ging the river. Although heartbroken
because of the suddenness of the dis-
aster, all joined in expressing a hope
that the bodies would be 'recovered
during the week. "The accident pros-
Crated my parents," said Francis H.
Bacon last night, "and my brother and
I persuaded them to remain at home
during the search. We will stay here
until the bodies are found."
Throng Haunts Scene.
The general impression now held
by all those engaged in the search is
that the remains of the victims have
been carried beyond the old bridge.
Previously it was thought that they
might be found under the power house
or in the mill race, but as a result of
the search yesterday, everyone is in-
clined to believe that they have "been
carried below the points where the
search has thusfar been confined.
Thousands of people witnessed the -
efforts of the diver and the grapplers
on the river. A constant stream of
men, women and children, eager to see

o'clock at the Union. the place of the disaster, and to be of
-assistance hurried to the dam yester-
NEW YORK EDITOR TO LECTURE. day. At any time of the day fully a
thousand people, a fourth of whom
Paul More of "The Nation" Magazine were women could be seen gazing at.
to Address Newspaper Class. the spot where the canoe turned over,
Paul E. More, editor of The Nation, or watching the efforts of the diver.
New York, will talk on "Reactions in
Journalism" bofore Prof. Scott's news- Buffalo and Washington Men Dance.
paper class at 9:00 o'clock tomorrow Scalp and Blade, the sectional club
morning in room 105 West hall. The of Buffalo men and the Cabinet club,
lecture will be open to the public. composed of students from Washihg
Mr. More will also address the ton, D. C., held a combined dance at
Schoolmasters' club while in the city Packard academy last night. About
on "The Paradox of Oxford." The lec- -35 couples were present.
torn wvil l b uiva at8 00 nrnlrT'i

s are Mr. and Mrs. R. W. lege will lecture to the Classical con-
rd Mr. E. S. Rogers, ference at its meeting in the lecture
room of Memorial hall this afternoon
'esideut in Kemp's Absence. at '2:00 o'clock. He will talk on the
W. Wilson, '13, literary "Transition from the Roman System
lent of the Union, has been of Dating to the Modern System." A
acting president by E. G. conference intended to throw light on
ing his absence on the Glee the problems of secondary Latin will
follow. Prof. F. W. Kelsey of the Lat-
in department will ta-lk on "Caesar B.
is Visiting in Ann Arbor. G. VI. 26 Again" and, following this
eFarland, '13, is visiting Ann , will be an illustrated lecture on "Ro-
week. He has been teach-k man Ruins in Timgad," by Prof W. S.

hitt.
Short stop-Lavans.
Third base-Hughitt, and McQueen.
Outfield-Bell, Howard, Corey Shee-
hy and Sisler.
Nour'ie, one of the men who played

II

luewt e een at -6;u o ocioe Pr -

, -g aIIXle~ V - Is. ~ A ,1XIk '3L t vi cfjv n a.o V u v A Pi
third base last season and who was 7VAY FINAL G'IMES TONIGHT ,day evening in Sarah Caswell Angell
expected to make a strong bid for hall.
the same position this year, will not be The final round of the bridge tour-
a contender for the job as guardian of nament will be played at 7:30 o'clock 1913 Laws Hold April Fool Party.
the far corner. Nourie holds a, degree tonight at the Union. C. S. Kennedy, The senior laws held their annual
from St. Viateurs, Chicago, and though '13M, and C. H. Royon, '13L, are the "All Fool's" dance last evening at the
last year the eligibility committee al- high men with J. B. Craig, '14E, and Union. Ninety were present. "The
lowed him to play on the grounds that ' C. G. Mills, '14, following. The coin- Crease," the official program and bul-
the Chicago institution was not on ' mittee announces that prizes will be letin of. the class, was used. Prof. and
Michigan's accredited list, this year presented to the two high teams and Mrs. E. R. Sunderland and Prof. and
(Continued on page 4.) also to the "booby" men. Mrs.J. H. Drake chaperoned.

Lav Attendance Committee to MeeL
The attendance committee will meet.
today at 3:00 o'clock. It will consid-
er all excuses from law students who
wish to be excused either before oi af-
ter the spring recess.
Homeops Choose Baseballs Manager.
Harold L. Morris, '13H, was elected
baseball manager by the honm6ps Sats
urday. at a snecial election,;

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