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March 30, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-03-30

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The

Michigan

N

MAIL $2.00

Daily

[

LOCAL $1JO

U

MAIL $41.00

U

I, No. 128.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, MARCH 30, 1913.

PR.IOU 11VUY

..

iTAIN FALLS
0 CONTRA.RIE
IARY'SCAREER
ty Audieice at 11hlitney T'he.ater
Farewell to Most Brilliant
of )Jichigdan Union
- Operas.
001) (4RNSTEAi) SCORES
)NDERFUTL ILNDLVIiDUAL JilT.
id Chorus Put Best Efforts Into
Performance; Comedy Brings'
Many Laughs.
being treated for four days
real out-of-town girl," "Contra-
ry" made' her departure froinm
:bor last night, amid the noisy
gretful farewells of a capacity
e which, in addition to its own
regards, seemed to offer by.
he adieus of all who made her{
ltance during her stay at the
y theater.

I THE WEATHER MA
Forecast for Ann.Arbor-Sundayun-
settled weather and possibly rain.
'University observatory -_Saturday,
7 r:00 ,p. m~. temperature 46.0; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
49.8; minimum temperature 24 hours
preceding 27,0; average wind velocity
12 miles per hour.
NOT ED AUJTHOR HERE TONIGHT.

MUSiCAL CLUBS
LEAVE MONDAY
ON ANNUAL TRIP
Tour Through Pacifi Northwest Will
Be Longest Ever Undertaken
by Organization on Own
Responsibility.
PROF. HOLBROOK WILL BE
FACULTY REPRESENTATIVE
Conoerts at Chicago and St. Paul Will
Be Only For Michigan
Alumni Members.

BEST RUNNERS
REMOVED FROM
CLASSRELAYS
T rainer Farrell Forbids Varsity Track
Candidates From Taking Part
in Contests Between
Campus Teams.
WILL DEVOTE ENTIRE TIME
ON WORK FOR EASTERN MEET
Strong One-Mile and Two-Mile Squads
Will Represent Michigan at
Pennsylvania.

LARGE FUNDS ARE RAISED ON
CAMPUS FOR FLOOD VICTI

IS

-0-
Liberal Donations of Money and Supplies of
Clothing Are Quickly Collected
by Special Committees

-0-

." ,;

Prof. R a sehenbIueS to Talk In U.
Hall; to Collect' Flood Funds.
Prof. Walter Rauschenbusch, of the
Rochester Theloagical .Seminary,
"Christian Socialist," author, and lec-
turer of international reputation, will
speak in University Hall this evening
at the nion service of the Ann Arbor
churches. His subject will be "The
Gospel of Gallilee, and the Age of the
Power .Machine."
Prof . Rauschenbusch is the author
of "Christianity and. the Social Crisis,"
and 'Christianizing the Social Order,"
two books which have created much

OHIO STUDENTS HEAR FAMILIES ARE SAFE

---

* * * s * s * * * *s
* s
* RELIEF FUND TO DATE. *

Reassuring messages, informing
many Ohioans at the university that
their parents and relatives were safe,
have been coming into Ann Arbor

ntrarie Mary" made her debut
instantaneous hit she certain-
done of her popularity last
Mindful of the fact that it
last performance of the show
.ty, the entire cast and chorus
ly put forth their best efforts
t. Thae principals put iore
.to their lines, the singers
ility into their singing and the
more vigor into their steps:
ence enjoyed it and put more
its applause.
every part in the cast was
capably the shining star was
Grinstead, in the part of
," and if there is anything to
ted about "Contrarie Mary,'
le fact that the audience was
eh little opportunity to enjoy
a and grace which he put into
rnance and which place him
with Julian Eltinge and oth-
sional female impersonators.
1's work in the "Temptation
rould have done credit to a
s' show.
McConley's impersonation of
student and Lyle Cliff as the
reshman, as well as Joe Tur-
k, gave a sparkle to the action
r many a hearty laugh. But
rpin was funny as "Lucy," he
ith the feminine part of the
when with Ed Wilson, he
actical demonstration of why
y abolished the J-Hop.
;h Westerman's singing of
rer," a song of real merit was
aring and brought several
encores. B. D. Bromley and
,orus made the "Friars' Song"
ile "Contrarie Mary" was for-
having a strong cast the suc-;
he principals was in large
due to the quality of the
abert G. Beck enjoys the dis-
of having written the first
era book possessing a real
lines that caused real laugh-
'Contrarie Mary" was rather
comedy than a comic opera--

Leaving Ann Arbor tomorrow at
2:33 o'clock over the Michigan Central,
the University of Michigan Glee and
Mandolin clubs will begin their 5,300-
mile journey to thePacific Coast. The
musical organizations will be gone 17
days, during which time concerts will
be given in 12 cities between Michigan
and Washington.
The trip wlil be by far the longest
ever undertaken by a local student or-
ganization, on its own responsibility.
A party of 30 men will be carried, in-
eluding Prof. Evans Holbrook, of the
law department, faculty representa-
tive. Manager Malcolm McCormick,
'15, who has had entire charge of the
arrangements for the extended tour,
will also accompany the clubs, and
manage the organizations while en
route.
The first appearance on the trip will
be made in Battle Creek, Tnesday
night. Seats for the initial concert
have had a good sale, according to re-
ports from the Cereal town, and as a
result the clubs will begin the more7
distant portion of their trip with a cred-
itable financial backing. Guarantees,
have been received from all towns in
which the Michigan men will perform.
On the occasion of the Silver Anni-
versary of the Michigan Alumni Asso-
ciation of Chicago, Wednesday even-1
ing, the Glee and Mandolin clubs will
give the principal numbers on the
program, following the elaborate ban-l
quet at the La Salle hotel. The Mich-
igan clubs' special car will leave Chi-
cago for St. Paul at 10:40 o'clock the1
same night, in which city the Wolver-
ine musicians will also perform solely1
for the entertainment of alumni. The
remainder of the concerts on the tour
will be open to the public. On the re-
turn trip they will give a concert atl
Fargo, North Dakota.I
A booklet containing the completec
itinerary of the trip has been publish-t
ed by the management of the clubs, for1
the benefit of the men making the trip,l
and for the use of friends in address-9
ing mail..
PROF. HEMPL TALKS QN NEW c
THEORY OF RESEARCH WORK1

PROF. WALTER JAUSCHENBUSCH.
agitation and discussion in the relig-
ious and philosophical worlds because
of their socialistic nature.
An appeal for funds for the relief of
the flood sufferers will be made during
the evening by a member of the facul-
ty and the collection turned over to
that purpose. A musical program will
be rendered during the service which
begins at 7:46 o'clock.
While in the city, Prof. Rauschen-
busch will be the guest of the Rev.
Frank Bachelor, of the Baptist church.
FRANCHISE BILL IS FAVORED.
Senate Will Consider Student Voting
fleasure Next Week.
A bill providing franchise rights for
Michigan students who are residents of
the state will be submitted for consid-
eration to the state senate in about a
week. The bill which arranges for the
submission to the electors at the next
general election in the fall of 1914 of
an amendment to the state constitution
enabling the legislature to make such
franchise rights possible, was recently
reported out of the election committee
of the senate..
The original committee which form-
ed the bill is endeavoring to arouse
favorable public opinion throughout
the state. It has prepared three ar-
ticles which most of the state papers
have published as editorials.
LAW ATTENDANCE COMMITTEE
TO CONSIDER VACATION BOLTS.
All law students wishing to be ex-

Trainer Farrell has forbidden all
varsity track candidates to run on the
class relay teams, in order that they
may devote their entire time to train-
ing for the Pennsylvania relay carni-
val, at which- Michigan will be repre-
sented by mile and two-mile teams,
according to present indications, in-
stead of four-mile and mile quartets,
as in recent years..
This completely upsets the dope on
the inter-class relay series, which had
been conceded to the junior Tits on
their winning the departmentalstitle
from the freshmen quartet last week,
with the same quartet of Varsity stars
which last year won the campus cham-'
pionship. The entire junior lit team
as well as its alternates is now eligible
for the future races.
In addition to Carver, Brown, Jan-
son, and White, of the junior lits;
Blake and Baier, of the junior engi-
neers, Haff of the fresh laws and Cohn
of the junior engineers are now ineligi-
ble to compete in the rest of the in-
ter-class relay schedule.
With Brown to lead off, Carver to
follow, and Haimbaugh to finish, there
is only one berth to fill on a two-mile:
squad. Jansen seems the logical man
for this place, unless Farrell finds him
more valuable in the mile quartet,j
which also has one place uncertain.
Haff, Craig, and Baier all appear to
be certain of places on the mile aggre-
gation, having made 440 time which<
averages up to the best in the east.
Plummer may solve the difficulty ofa
completing this team, as he showed
exceptionally well in the little workt
he did last spring.]
DR. SELLARS WILL LECTURE
AT NEWBERRY HALL TONIGHT.
"The Jew as a Social Reformer" will
be the subject of an address to be de-
livered by Dr. Roy Sellars,of the phil-
osophy department,in Newberry hall1
tonight at 8:00 o'clock under the aus-j
pices of the Menorah society. Dr. Sel-t
lars will treat particularly of the Jew-]
ish leaders in the socialistic move-
ment.1
The lecture tonight is one of a series
of addresses which is being arranged
by the Menorah society on subjects
pertaining to Jewish history
and problems. Prominent faculty
men and lecturers have been engagedt
to appear during the course. The ad-
dresses are open to the general public.
L. L. Cline Takes Up Reporting Work.,
Leonard L. Cline, '14, has forsaken
the collegiate life to try his hand at

*
s
s
s
"

Michigan Union Com. .$
Medical Department ..
Faculty Committee ....
University Women,..

188.74
125.00
70.00
415.00

Total for Camp. to date 798.74
A. A. Civic League ......1,200.00
Total for Ann Arbor .. 1,998.74

* * * * * * * * * * *
Students at both extremities of pros-
perity responded generously to the call
for funds to aid the flood sufferers in
Ohio and Indiana, and the results show
a material expression of sympathy on
the part of faculty and students.
The Michigan Union committeemen
stationed'at points of vantage on the
campus yesterday, proved an efficient
means of collecting funds, and contri-
butions, varying in amount from the
humble copper to paper money of re-
spectable denomination poured in all
day. The committee will meet at 2:30
o'clock this afternoon at the Tnion to
decide whether further collections will
be made. Meanwhile they are await-
ing word from Governor Cox, of Ohio,
as to whether cash or food and cloth-
ing will be the most acceptable.
Medical students contributed $53,
and the faculty of their department
$72. This has been placed in the hands
of Prof. Warren P. Lombard, who is
making an attempt to get into com-
munication with Dr. Gertrude Felker,
'd1M, in Dayton, to whom, it is planned,
the funds will be given for use. Dr,
Felker is engaged in social service.
work, and it is believed that she will
be able to give the best disposition of
their relief funds. At present Dr.
Lombard is trying to send a wireless
or special delivery message to her.
Half a carload of old clothing and
shoes have been collected so far by
the civic league, and $400 worth of
provisions, clothing, etc., have been ad-
ded to this. The collection of second
hand wear will be continued Monday,
and all who have anything they wish
to give are urged to leave their bun-
dles on the porches of their -homes,
from which they .will be taken to the
league by the Merchant's Delivery
wagons. $800 has been wired to Gov.
Cox, this being the balance of the
cash fund up to noon yesterday. The
car will be sent an some time Monday.
All contributions of cash may be
madea to Treasurer Campbell, the Mich-
igan Union, or at the Union Service in
University Hall tonight.
University women raised the total
of their relief fund to $415 yesterday
by the additional sale of reception
tickets and pledges from collegiate
alumnae. This places the women's
fund far in advance of the men's.
At a meeting of the finance commit-
(Continued an page 3.)
Samuel Ball Speaks on Class Coniliets.
Samuel W. Ball spoke on "The Class.
Conflict" last night in Newberry, Hall.
The lecture, which was the third of the
socialist lyceum course, was well at-
tended.

s
M
i
R
"

since early yesterday morning. Among
the first to hear good tidings was W. C.
Breidenbach, '15, of Piqua, Ohio, who
learned Friday night that his family
was in no danger. Later came relayed
wires of the same portent to H. F.
Wendel, '14, also of Piqua, . Turpin,
'14, D. Estabrook, '16, H. C. Lange, '16,
Miss Leah Moskowitz, '16, of Dayton,
and W. Maier, '13, of Troy.
C. E. Zinn, '16E, and Frank McHale,
'14, of Logansport, Ind., hearing re-
ports of the flood situation at that
point, have left for home. Dwight Esta-
brook, '16H, of Dayton, whose brother
left Columbus, Ohio, for home, also
went to Dayton and, although no word
has been received from either, they are
not believed to be in danger.
The anxiety for the safety of loved
ones has been dispelled among most
university men and women, but the
question of financial loss now presents
a serious difficulty. Many believe that
property loss and stagnation of busi-
ness will render it impossible for them
to return after spring vacation. A
definite estimate being impossible, sur-
mises to the extent of individual loss
among the families of university men
and women, raise a doubt in the mnids
of many as to their continuance of
scholastic work.
Michigan students from southern
Ohio and the Kentucky border line are
now entertaining fears of eminent
danger concerning their families. The
volume of water choking down into the
Ohio from the contributory rivers of
the north, means flood devastation
along a line extending from Hunting-
ton, W. Va., and Ironton, Ohio, to Mis-
sissippi. P. Koontz, '14, P. B. Harsha
'14, R. E. Amos, '13, and Adna Johnson,
'14, are among those on the southern
Ohio flood mark. Attempted commu-
nication with these points has been
unavailing, but it is expected that
preparation will prevent a repetition
of the Dayton disaster.
PLANS FOB HONOR SYSTE"
TO BE GIY1N NEW IMPETUS.
The various class presidents of the
university will gather at the Union
this afternoon to consider and discuss
the much agitated honor system. The
immediate object of the meeting will'
be to consider ways and means for
promoting discussion in the different
classes regarding the honor system,
and to find out the feasibility of adopt-
ing honor examinations. Efforts will
be made later by the class heads to
get before their classes the facts re-
garding honor systems in other
schools. George Burgess is expected
to preside.
CHEMICAL SOCIETY TO HEAR
ADDRESS BY PROF. W. J. HALE
The Michigan section of the Amer-
Ican chemical society will hold its
fourth meeting Monday at 4:30 o'clock
in room 151 of the chemistry building.
Prof. William J. Hale will address the
meeting on "The Condensation of Acet-
ylacetone with Urea."

"The Relation between the Hitites
and the Greeks," was the subject of a
talk delivered by Prof George Hempl,
of Leland Stanford university, in the
old Latin room in University hall yes-
terday morning. Prof. Hlempl showed
the connection between the language
of the ancient Hitites and that of the

e Critics Say.

nusic and the cast
,11 previous operas,
en better than I had
ertainly the best yet
t it will not end on,
d:
ular, music, singing,
13 opera is the best

C-

Doric Greeks and the similarity be- metropolitan journalism. He left Ann
tween the two raes. This is a new Arbor last Tuesday and is at present
theory, established br Prof. Hempl, in working on the Detroit Free Press in a
extensive research en the subject. reportorial capacity.
* ~~eb~trtan Cuc

ver had. All the principals ' cused from classes either before or af-
ast and the chorus is excep- ter spring vacation 'are requested to
)od. Mr. St. John is to be meet the, attendance committee when
commended for the way in they meet Tuesday, April 2. Absences
men were trained. The or- adjacent to^ the spring recess will.
ontinued on page 2.) count as three regular absences,

Io:3o Service.

Spiritual Development

R1ev. L. E. Barretti

_

-- -

Walter

Rauschenbusch

mon Series
7:45 P M.

Offerings for
Flood Sufferers

m - 1
tY Hll

U

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