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October 13, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-10-13

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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YOUR
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The

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Daly

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ADDRESS

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XXIII, No.'11

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 13, 1912.

PRICE

ER.BUCKS
E DEFEATED

a

I

THE, WEATHER MAN

I

Forecest
cool; brisk
monishing.

for Ann Arbor--Fair and
to high westerly winds di-

AT 55-4 SCORE
YESTERDAY'S GAME ON FERRY
FIELD SLOW TO BEGIN, WAS
FEATURED BY AVALANCHE IN
SECOND HALF.
CRAIG AN INDIVIDUAL STAR
First Time in History That The
Farmers Ever Made A Touch-
Down Against Michigan.
For about thirty minutes yesterday
afternoon the aggregation composing
the M. A. C. football team threw an
awful scare into Michigan. Then for
the next thirty minutes the Michigan.
scoring machine put on full steam and
swamped the Farmers with an ava-
lanche of touchdowns that satisfied the
most rabid rooter. A total of forty
eight points were amassed the last
half and the game ended with the
score of 55 to 7.
The game started all wrong. Michi-
gan took the ball and marched toward
the goal and then a forward pass was
uncorked. B. Miller, a Farmer end,
got his paws on the ball and set off on
a marathon for eighty-five yards,
crossing the goal line and putting the
Wolverines on the short end. The
quarter ended with Michigan still
trailing and it was not until nearly
the end of the first half that Craig
plunged through for the tying count.
rhen the excitement started and by
straight football, mixed with a little
forward passing, it was just at

TECHNICALITY
LOSS OF VOTE
PRESENTATION OF TRE ASURER'S
RECEIPT WAS DUE IN A GREAT
NUMBER OF CASES TO LOSS OFI
VOTE.

*
*
*

* What the Pigskin Experts Say. *
* -o- *
* The peculiar start and finish *
* of the Michigan-M. A. C. game *
* yesterday drew various com- *
* ments from the men who really *
* know football, after the battle *
* had concluded. Referee *
* Holderness, Coach Yost and *
* Coach Macklin all had spicy *
* comments to make on the con- *
* test. This is what they had to *
say:*
* Holderness-Michigan has the *
* best team in the west. *
* Mackli-I am perfectly satis- *
* flied. M. A. C. was fighting ev- *
* ery minute; that was all I ex-*
S pected of them. I hardly look- *
* ed for so large a score, howev- *
* er. You certainly have a fine *
* team.*
* Yost-The score suits me all *
* right, but during the first half, *
Michigan gave the greatest ex- *
* hibition of fumbling that I, *
* have ever seen.
FRESHMEN LOSE
INITIAL CONTEST
Youngsters Pitted Against Heavy
Team and Finished With
A 6-0 Score.
COACH CONTENT WITH SHOWING.

WGiscons'
Case 12,
Ohio St
Wabash
Vanderb
Army 19
Lehigh
Princeto
Wesleya
Dartmou
Carlisle
Cornell
Harvard
Yale 16,

* * * * * * * * *
resterdlay s Scores.
-0-
West. *.
,in 56, Northwestern 0 . *
Wooster 0.*
ate 34, Denison 0. *
62, DePauw 0. *
ilt 60, Rose Poly 0. *
East. *
, Rutgers 0.
14, Navy 0. *
n 31, V. P. I. 0. *
n 7, Brown 6. *
uth 55, U. of Vermont 0. *
30, Syracuse 0. *
14, U. of New York 6. *
1 26, Williams 3. *
Lafayette 0. -

ROOTERS MEETING
UNCORKS SPIRIT
Prof. R. E. Bunker Addresses Throngs
With Talk On College
Spirit.
URGE ROOTERS TO COME EARLY.

Director Phillip G. Bartelme
Willing To Correct Wrong If
Wrong Is Done.

SOPHOMORES VICTORIOUS
IN FALL BOUT; SCORE

Is

on of the size of the score.
ligan looked a little better than
eek but there were defects that'
d up yesterday that prevented
unt from being even larger. The
.ng was abominable, Michigan
the ball time and again at crit-
eriods. There were nearly a
cases of dropping the ball and
C. far excelled the Wolverines in
ring. The line appeared to be
hat stronger and on defense
.most impregnable to the Farm-
cks. In the early part of the
the speed which always charac-
a Yost team was rather lack-
it as the game progressed the
went off smoother. On offense
ne still allowed men to get
h and slow up plays and made it
ary for Thomson to get off his
rather hastily with the result
he kicking was not brilliant. It
line that looms up as the big
m for the backefild, which even
e numerous substitutions, work-
1.
Aggies played a good game ear-
he afternoon but weakened im-
ly before Michigan's constant
nashing. They were unable to
nd only made first down a few
es and then by forward
which were frequently used
arying success. The efforts of
r Farrell were evident in the
nt condition of the men and
fact that they were still fresh
M. A. C. was worn out, result-
the large score in the last quar-

I The Michigan freshmen lost their
first game yesterday when the heavy
Alma squad defeated them by a score
of 6 to 0. The game was played on an
extremely muddy field and the weight
of the college team was an important
factor in deciding the game. The on-
ly score in the game came early in the
second quarter when Alma pushed the
ball through the line for a touchdown
and failed to kick goal.
The youngsters showed rather a lack
of practice for their offense was rather
weak and ineffective against the Alma
team. A few forward passes were
tried but no substantial gains for any
distance were made by either team
via this aerial route. The defense of
the freshmen was excellent consider-
ing that they have had but little scrim-
mage and the line was exceedingly
strong. When Alma scored their lone
touchdown they had the ball on the
Freshman's one foot line on first down
but the stubborn defense prevented it
being pushed across until the fourth
down when the quarter managed to
wiggle through the mass for the re-
quired foot.
Although there were no particular
stars in the game the entire freshma
team played hard football and Coac
Conklin was satisfied with the showing.
Alma is the same team that held M.
A. C. to a 14 to 3 score last Saturday
and is considered the strongest small
college team in the state.
The lineup if the all fresh was:
Dillman, R. E.; Norton, R.T.; Beech-
ler, R.G.; Cochran, C.; Quayle, L.G.;
Deal, L.T.; Davis, L.E.; Catlett, Q.;
Benton, F.B.; Roehm, R.H.; Gault4L.
H.
"Painted Window" Appears Tuesday.
The first number of the "Painted
Window" will be put on sale Tuesday.
Great things are promised for it
the coming year. The 'ditorials are of
especial interest. Serial stories will
be a feature of the magazine this year
and they will start in the October

Dissatisfaction is rife among a large
number of students because, by a tech-
nicality, they were disqualified from
voting in the athletic association elec-
tions yesterday. On Thursday, a ruling
was passed by the-board of directors
of athletics, requiring the presentation
by each voter, of the university treas-
urer's receipt for dues, instead of the
athletic association membership book,
before a ballot would be awarded to
him. This action was taken by the
board on the grounds that the receipt
slips would be less likely to be lost in
Saturday's flag rush than would the
membership books.
Owing to an oversight, the action of
the board was not published in Fri-
day's issue of The Daily. Notices of
the ruling were issued from the ath-
letic office on Friday. Yesterday, the
-morning of the election, the ruling ap-
peared in connection with an advance
story of the election in The Daily.
This notification having failed to
reach a large number of voters, many
came to the polls with their athletic
books instead of the required receipts,
or with neither, thinking that there
would be no question as to exercise of
their suffrage rights. Owing to the flag
rush, many were unable to get their
receipt before the closing of the polls,
others were unable to find them, and
still others had sent their receipts
home. y
It is contended by those who were
disqualified from voting, because of
the technicality, that the membership
book should have been sufficient, or
that the filed list of members of the
athletic offices should have furnished
the basis of identification.
It is thought that the board of direc-
tors may move to a reconsideration
of the matter, or that the board in
control may review the ruling pass-
ed by the under body.
"If injustice has been done," said
Director Bartelme, last evening, when
interviewed, "I believe that the board
will do all in its power to correct the
same."
* * * * * * * * * * * *
* The Vote in Yesterday's Varsity *
Manager Elections. *
* -o- *
* Baseball Manager *
* V. L. McCarthy, '13L ...... .419 *
* Howard Ford, '13 ..........377 *
* Bruce Anderson, '13E......324 *
* Track Manager. *
Don Denison '13.........601. *
Dexter Rhej hart, '13 ......474 *
* otal vote cast for baseball *
*x ana r . . . ... .. .. .. .. ...1124 *
* Total vote cast for track man- *
* ager ....................1075 *
* * * * * * * * * * * *1

Booker T. Washington
P'hilosophy From
'Toil.
WILL SPEAK HERE

Dr. Booker T. Washington, who will
speak Monday .afternoon under the
auspices of the Oratorical Association,
will be entertained at a dinner at 5:30
o'clock to be held at the Michigan
Un:on club-house, following his ad-
dress. Among others, there will be
present at the dinner, Dr. Angell, Pres-
ident Hutchins, Professor Trueblood,
and members of the Oratorical As-
sociation.
Born a slave on a Virginia planta-
tion, just prior to the Civil War, in the
midst of the most discouraging sur-
roundings, and hedged about by seem-
ingly insurmountable difficulties,Book-
er T. Washington has risen to his pres-
ent eminent position as the leader of
his r!ace and one of the foremost men
of the country, by the sheer force of
hard work and a dominant personality.
A career, marked at its inception by
struggles to obtain an education while
forced to aid in the support of a family
during the terrible times of depression1
following the great war, and always
requiring the utmost of faith and dog-
ged determination, presents obstacles
before which the average man stands
appalled.
As a boy Booker T. Washington,
having gained the elements of his ed-
ucation in such odd moments as he
could spare, in 1872 contrived to make
his way to the Institute at Hampton,
Virginia. Here he made such a record
that he was appointed to take charge
of the new school for negroes at Tus-
kegee, Alabama, in 1881. The Tuske-
gee Institute has since become famous
for the principle which it has main-
tained-that of combining a knowledge,
of useful trades with book-lyearning in
the education of the colored race. Ear-
ly in life, he acquired a reputation as
a brilliant speaker, his address at the
Atlantic Exposition in 1895 on the ne-
gro problem, creating a sensation. In
the following year, he was presented
with the honorary degree of Master
of Arts by Harvard University.
Booker T. Washington's creed may
best be summed up in his own words:
"I have learned that success is to be
measured not so much by the position
that one has reached in life as by the,
obstacles which he has dvercome while
trying to succeed."1

FORCE AND WORK
GAVE HIM POWER

Learned His
Life of
TOMORROW.

The second attempt at a big outdoor
mass meeting before a Varsity foot-
ball team developed even more enthu-
siasm among the student rooters than
the first. Perhaps it was the presence
of the opposing rooting force; perhaps
it was the presence of the fine M. A. C.
cadet band at Ferry field yesterday,
but at any rate the U. of M. supporters
cheered and sang their respective
throats hoarse from the first fiery en-
treaty by "Whitey" Otis to the final
singing of the "Yellow .and Blue" at
the conclusion of the game. And chief
among those whose throats were
hoarse, was Prof. R.E.Bunker who gave
the rooters who assembled early a
fine sturdy address.
"Whitey" Otis started enthusiasm
proceedings as soon as a sufficient
rooting contingent had been gathered,
together. He made a stirring little
appeal to the students by challenging
the right to be called "Michigan men"
of every one who did not have "pep"
enough to get out and cheer the team
to victory. From then on Otis and his;
corps of assistants had nothing to ask
of the rooters. They were on the job;
when the score jlooked blackest and
when there was Ja considerable rift in
the clouds.f
Frank Murphy, as chairman of the
mass meeting interoduced Prof. Bunker
of the law department. Prof. Bunker
made a stirring address. He spoke of

MEMBER OF SOP CLASS :
QUALIFIED FOR ENTERING
FRESHMAN RANKS IN THE 4i
OF A FIRST YEAR MAN.
CONCEDES IT A CLEAN Rt
Annual Appearance of "AdvIce
Freshmen," Contains Some Re
Live Tips.
Scoring three points to their ver
opponents two, the class of 1915
quished the freshmen yesterday m
ing in the fall contests. Both of
classes turned out well and a
sized crowd was on South Ferry
to witness the annual scrap bet,
the two underclasses.
Arriving first, the freshmen gro
themselves around the three poles
liberally applied the mark of ver
cy, green paint, on their faces.
army of sophs soon arrived and fo
ing into two columns they marchee
to the first pole as soon as Ref
"Hap" Haff fired the starting sho
The unexperienced fresh were o
powered by their opponents and it
only three minutes for the banne
the first pole to be in the posses
of a soph. The second pole was
tured by the second yearmen in
minutes.
It was round the third pole that
battle took place and twenty min
had passed before an agile soph
able to climb over the fighting fi
and force his way tip the pole
gain the banner. The actual time
the rush was 28 minutes.
Masquerading as a fresh, a soph
found among the first year men gatl
ed around the middle pol. He
daubed with green paint an the fr
men thinking that he was a fel
classman helped him up the pole,
when he kept on climbing they real:
that they had been deceived. W
his identity was discovered he was
mediately disqualified by Gent
Chairman "Eddie" Saier, and the
was awarded to the freshmen.
As the sophonmore took an unfair
vantage and also violated one of
rules of the rush in not forming
one of the two columns that adva
upon the outside poles the point
'given to the freshmen. It was lean
that he did this contrary to the w
es of the sophomore class but on
count of this conduct the second
class suffered.
"I promised that I would be fait
both sides," said General Chai
Saier last night, "I awarded the
points to the freshman for the pro
tion of the rush. If the sophomore
gone unnoticed it would mean t
some one would be seriously inju
next year and this could not affor
happen. The rush as a whole was
cleanest one that has been held."
The cane spree was won by
sophs, 17-5, inten minutes.
Proclamations to the fresh were
sued by the sophs Friday night
contained lively tips to the verd
ones as to campus rules and cust
One of the commands was to stay a'
from the "chicken coops" in Ypsi
leave them to the mercy of the up]
classmen.

Michigan spirit and his appeal to Mich-
igan men was appreciated by those
who were in a position to hear it.
Notwithstanding the true rooting
spirit that was generated before yes-
terday's game,, there is, in the opinion
of those who have the interest of the
new schme at heart, one thing that,
will go to make the outdoor meetings
much more of a success. This would
be to get the rooters out -early. Yes-
terday's meeting would have been
much more of a success if the rooters
had been out early enough to conduct
the meeting before the preliminaries
of the game were put under way. At
least this is the sentiment of a number
of people who were unable to hear
Prof. Bunker during the din of the
bands and cheering.
EMINENT READER TO GIVE
RECITAL TUESDAY EVENING
Oratorical Association to Feabtre Mrs.
K. 0. McCoy and "Bunty
Pulls the Strings."
Mrs Katherine Oliver-McCoy, for-
merly Miss Catherine Oliver and
known as "The Dean of Scotch Read-
ers," will be heard next Tuesday even-
ing in the second of the series of enter-
tainments to be held under the aus-
pices of the Univetsity Oratorical As-
sociation. She will appear in a recital
of scenes from Graham Moffat's popu-
lar play, "Bunty Pulls the Strings."
Mrs. McCoy has acquired an unique
reputation as an interpreter of Scot-
tish literature, both in this country
and in England, where she has recit-
ed before many eminent persons, in-
cluding James Barrie, who commended
her interpretation of his own work,
(Continued on page 4.)

the particular star of the
Vork of the Detroit boy
criticism and it was his
ad end runs that gave
>st of her gains. Thom-
some of his old time form
e line and Collette made
ession while he was in.
he team well and was in
y, his long run being one
es of the afternoon. Bar-
ated the fact that he is a
tLinued on page 4.)

PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Surmon Today: "«e Seven Lamps of Architecture"
STUDENT BIBLE "CLASSES FIRST SEMESTER

a'

Wisdom Literature, Class for men
Minor Prophets, Class for women,
Greek New Testament,
Old Testament Characters,
Church and Social Problems,
Mission Study Class, China

Sunday 12.10
Sunday 12 10
Sunday 9.30
Monday 6.45
Tuesday 6.45
Wed. 6.45

Deroit Artist to Come Soon.
Artist Ives, of Detroit, is expected
in the city soon to make changes ir
the picture of Prof. Edson R. Sunder-
land which he painted last spring
The painting, when satisfactiry, .will
be hung in the law. library and is a
gift to the department by the 1912
class.

Inumber.

Leaders, Mr. Barrett, Mrs. French, Dr. French

Union Series

Carl

a tto n

Presbyterian

TONIGHT

Chu

"The Value of Christian Religion Its Intellectual
and Moral Foes"

Cor. Divis!i

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