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February 16, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-02-16

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LOCAL $1.0 $
M4AIL $2.00

The

Michigan

Daily

NO

.1 YPTFF "AT.n Y19..

Vol. XXIm, No. 92.
DEANS ASSERT
COUNCIL'S FATE
IS IN BALANC
Student Council Must Act Wisely
Hop Probe to Uphold its
Prestige, Declare
Faculty Men.
QUERY OF COUNCIL CALLED
IN QUESTIOiN BY TWO DEA
Professors Cooley and Bates Comm,
on Relation to Faculty
Investigations.
That the fate of the student coun
depends on its treatment of the m

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 16, 1913. PRICE FIVE CENTS

E
in
NS
Dnt

J THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann Arbor-Colder to-
day; probably snow.
University Observatory- Saturday,
7:00 p. inm., temperature 35.2; maxi-
mum temperature 24 hours preceding,
43.2; minimum temperature, 24 hours
preceding, 22.4; average wind velocity
12 miles per hour.
WELL KNOWN LIBRARIAN IS I
FEATURE OF UNION PROVR1tAM
Samuel Ranck, of Grand Rapids, to be
Principal Speaker at Today's
Gathering.
Members of the Union who attend

Cie
,en

found implicated in the trouble at the
gymnasium the night of the Hop, is
the opinion of Dean M. E. Cooley and
Dean H. M. Bates.
The faculties have given all the
names and evidence in their possession
to the council, and are awaiting its
action before proceding farther in the
pnatter. The council, however,has tied
itself hand and foot by securing all its
additional information under a prom-
ise to divulge nothing to the faculty,
and to give no publicity by name to
those sent home.
Council's Method Seeret.
The council claims that it could se-
cure no information except under
such a pledge. It is a fact, however,,
that the faculty had given it informa-
tion which the faculty itself considers
of sufficient importance to result in
probably severe disciplinary measures.
. The policy of the council, <as near as
it can' be determined, is to ask the
men found guilty to leave college, at-
taching no publicity to the matter.
The faculty, on th other hand, is in
favor of publicity; feeling that the
university has been disgraced, and
that an example must be made of the

it
a
e
s
d
e
a
5
1
a

the regular Sunday afternoon meeting
this afternoon will have the privilege
of hearing an address by Samuel
Ranck, head of the library system of
Grand Rapids. His talk, which will
be given at 3:00 o'clock, will take up
the possibilities of library work when
carried on in a scientific manner by
trained experts.
Mr. Ranck hae done much to in-
crease the influence of public libraries
in Grand Rapids. He is a personal
friend of Prof. Wenley and it was
through him that he was secured.

i

ENFORCE TANGO DECREE AT
UNION DANCE; NO FATALITIES

i

Tango or no tango, the full attend-
ance at last night's Union dance indi-
cated that the popularity of the week-
ly dances has not in any way decrea┬ž-
ed as a result of the recent ban placed
on certain dances. The members of
the committee were on the alert all
evening for violators, but nearly all
of the dancers accepted the new rule
gracefully and the committee had little
trouble.

BOTH MUSICAL
CLUBS CANNOT
TOUR IN WEST
I Kanagement of 0 nIsaton Can
lam"g Coast Tlp, uak
WM epeent the
a ,. a 0I1k Clb.
ALUM I CANNOT GUAA
I:NOU1 TO TAu ALL ALONG
Clubs Will Give Concerts in Saginaw
and Port Huron Friday
and Saturday.
If the Michigan Musical clubs make
a western trip during the spring vaca-
tion their personnel will probably con-
sist of 20 niembers of the Glee club
and a quarte from t a dolin club,
according to he ision r ched yes-
terday aftern on, y the mandolin men.
The mone uarantees which the
management as been able to obtain
from the we tern cities necessitate a
reduction in the number of men tak-
ing the trip, and rather than cut down
the size of both clubs to such a point
that neither could appear in its
proper form, the Mandolin club men
voted to be represented by a stringe
quartet.f
This change will make the concertsE
of a much differentnature than those
given on previous trips, where a full
lub of 40 men has been carried. The
tinerary which now seems most prob-
able will include the leading cities ind
1ontana, Washington and Oregon, ase
well as a number of intermediate
oints.d
Next Friday afternoon both clubs
will leave for'Port Huron where they
vill appear that evening. Saturdays
vening a concert will be given in Sag-t
naw, and the return trip will be madeT
unday.c
ORTIHWESTERN FORBIDS TANGO C
i
lean of Medical College Says Dance is s
Mere "Gyration." L
Dances, such as the "bear;" tango,
nd others, were barred at the-musical c
ollege of Northwestern University H
esterday by Dean Lutkin. His ar- o
aignment of certain popular steps
'hich he. termed "gyrations" calledN
orth a defense from Prof. Charles
utton. The dean referred only to the
aforrnal dances at the auditorium.
"I have seen nothing objectionable D
t these informal dances," said Prof.
utton. "The musical students are al-
ost alone in understanding and ap-
reciating rhythm, and their dances
,re nothing more than artistic expres- P
ions and frolicsome pleasure. The d
verage student or fraternity member a
utside the musical college knowsl
bout as much about a rhythm as a cat l
oes about a symphony." e
W
AMOUS ALABAMA MINISTER p
WILL LECTURE HERE TONIGHT p
a
The Rev. John W. Phillips, former- s
V of New York, now of the First Bap- q
ist church of Mobile, Alabama, will u
;cture on "The Limit of Illumination"
might in the Methodist Episcopal u
burch at 7:30 o'clock. Mr. Phillips a
a public orator of note. The lecture a]
the February number of the Wes- Y
yan guild lecture course. e

WOMEN FRAME
REMONSTRANCE
AGAINST TANGO
Resolution Adopted by Women'
League Board Protesting Against
All Dancing of Extreme
Nature.
TANGO MEETS THIRD REBUKE
OF WEEK FOLLOWING HOP.
Action of Union Officials in Regard
to Radical Dances is
Commended.
"We want to go on record as taking
a decided stand against all objection-
able dancing," was the resolution
adopted at the board meeting of the
Women's League yesterday morning.
Every member of the board present ex-
pressed her views on the matter, in no
uncertain terms.
The tango was the principal topic
of discussion. Several women argued
that the dance in itself was a graceful
affair, and could be indulged in with-
out any degree of impropriety. Sever-
al opposed it outright. Thinking, how-
ever, that under the existing circum-
stances it would be for the best inter-
ests of the women as a whole to taboo
this dance with the others, the tango
was classed as undesirable.
The "clutch hold" also had its in-
ning. The discussion on this mode of
dancing was brief, as all who express-
ed views said that there seemed to be
little in its favor and urged that such
dancing be classed as objectionable.
Before a vote was taken, Dean Myra
B. Jordan spoke of the commendable
stand that the men on the campus had
taken through the Michigan Union.
This, in her opinion, was enough to
cause the women to act, but since the
different class committees of the lit
department had taken action which
nvolved both men and women, it
eemed that the course of the Women's
League lay in but one direction.
Little time was devoted to the dis-
ussion of the abolishment of the
lop other than a general expression
f regret that the affair had to go.
VOTED CHICAGO PREACHER TO 3
GIVE ADDRESSES HERE TODAY.
)r. Charles W. Gilkey to Talk Before
Chinese Club and Give Sermon
This Evening.
Dr. Charles W. Gilkey, of the Hyde 1
ark Baptist church, Chicago, will ad-i
ress the Chinese Students' club this
fternoon at 4:00 o'clock at McMil-
an hall. Dr. Gilkey is one of the mostE
minent theologians in this country.-
Vhile in London he made a great im-e
ression when he spoke for the liberal
arty. Crowds thronged wherever he
ppeared, and he was finally asked to e
peak in behalf of Prime Minister As- r
uith before the latter's own constit-
ency. t
The Chicago pastor is to conduct the a
sual Sunday evening union servicep
t the Presbyterian church. He will s
so address the bible classes of the c
. M. C. A. Monday and Tuesday ev- c
nings at .6:00 o'clock. f

COMMUNICATION. CAMPUS THINKS
(The. Michigan Daily assumes no re--
ed in communications.)E
sponibiirsnmnt exrss --H u MAY BE~
After reading the published account
of the action last evening of the uni- BROUG
versity senate, and the comments
s thereon, I cannot restrain myself from Fraternities and Classes Will Take
making an answer. My wife and I Immediate Action Looking
were guests of the committee at the ,Toward Continuation
Hop, and a feeling of justice as well of Function.
as that due to your generous hospitali-
ty, compels me to write you. FACULTY HAD NOT MEDDLED
First, what are the facts? It is gen- WITH THE HOP SINCE 1896.
erally conceded that your committee
labored faithfully to make the Hop Management of Annual Social Event
the best that has been held since the by Union is One Remedy
board of regents took the control Suggested.
away frpm the Palladium fraternities, -
and made it a general university affair Will there be a Junior Hop at Michi-
under the auspices of the junior class- gan next year?
es.
This change, while desirable, makes If not, what will take its place?
control of the actions of the individu- At fraternity houses, boarding ta-
als more difficult. It is to be conceded bles, clubrooms, cafes, dance halls,
that there were people on the floor wherever Michigan men and women
who did not know how to dance the met yesterday, these two questions
latest dance called the tango, which is bearing on the startling action of the
a graceful dance and beyond adverse university senate Friday night, in
criticism. Personally, I do not con- abolishing the premier social event of
sider the feature dance music of the the year, were the foremost topics of
orchestra in the best of taste at a for- conversation, and brought forth a vari-
mal ball, but there was nothing vicious ety of opinions
about it. The committee endeavored The two most prevalent of these
to limit this feature music, but the were that the Junior Hop would be
orchestra did not follow instructions. reinstated, remodeled in accordance
Dark Dances Unintentional, with the demands of the faculty, and
In particular, the committee gave minus the features' branded by the
positive orders that the general lights authorities as objectionable; and that,
should not be turned off for any search- if the hop were abolished permanently,
light dances. When this occurred some similar function or functions
against the committee's positive or- would take its place.
ders, the committeemen in charge wil eii anpani 1fAntinj _

rushed to
ped.
(C

the gallery to have it stop-

ontinued on page 4.)

I-

I.,

ALUMNUS FAVORS

'

y I

THE CONFERENCE

e offense was an extraordinary

and extraordinary measurbs
d be adopted to prevent its repe-
L. 'This is the view of the deans
.e law and engineering depart-
s as expressed in an interview

February Issue of Graduate Magazine
Gives Reasons Favoring
- Michigan's Return.

st night.
Says Council Has Power.
"The student council pleaded for
any years that it had no power or
pport from the faculty," said Dean
Utes, "but it gradually has been given
ore authority. There is no student
dy in any institution of such size
ich has so much power as the stu-
nt council of the University of Mich-
tn, and the old excuse is no longer
lid. The council has the authority

S
a

E

ENIOR ADVISORY PLAN TREATED

The Michigan Alumnus for Febru-
ry contains a number of articles

9

which are of interest to the campus.
The Conference question is discussed
in. an editorial; the new system of

s
a
p

,e
rt
a:

nior advisors is explained in a short
ticle; the scholastic statistics com-
ring Michigan with other universi-,

DICKINSON IS NEW
SENIOR LIT HEAD
Senior Lits Ballot to Fill Vacancy
Caused by Resignation of
Harold Abbott.
NAME OTHER OFFICERS T SD
Selden S. Dickinson was elected
president of the senior lits yesterday
morning to succeed Harold B. Abbott,
who resigned in January. The election
was featured by a aratively light
vote, Dickinso inning from his op-
ponent, ow d W. Ford, by a count
of 47 to . A special meeting has
been call by the retiring president
for Tuesday afternoon at 4:00 o'clock
in Tappan hall for the purpose of in-
stalling the new executive.
Class day officers will also be elect-
ed by the class Tuesday. The positions
to be filled are historian, poet, proph-
etess, orator and toastmaster.
The name of the "pipe and stein"
committee of the class has been chang-
d to that of the "pipe and cane" com-
mittee. This committee, merely hon-
Drary in the past, will take charge of
he matter of ordering class canes,
ind the souvenir committee, which
previously considered the cane propo-
ition, will endeavor to devise some
ether memento of the "golden haze of
ollege days," which will be suitable
or both men and women.

and it must show its capacity to
such power or rapidly decline in
respect of both faculty and stu-
n two occasions this year, to my
ledge, the council has had an op-
anity to deal with a vital question.
.led, in my opinion at least. on the
question."

i

Believe Students Should Act.
believe the councilmen have an
rtunity to do a fine thing," said
1 Cooley, "but they must g,@t in
niddle of the road and stay there.
engineering facglty has given all
infQrmtion in its possession tQ
eouncil, and it would have acted'
ek ago on the matter, but the fact
the matter was not considered in
neeting at thlt time. We are now
ting the result of the euneil in-
gation, before tal~ng action.
hie mn lui my department who
ffected have been before me, and
t frankly that they are deserving
e punishment whic, will prob.
be metad out ;o them. If the coun-
oes ppt ct it will be materially
(Continued on pago O

k I

ties, are printed on colored charts;
and the present conditions at the gen-
eral library are discussed in a long ar-
ticle by the librarian, Theodore W.1
Koch.
In speaking of the Conference ques-
tion, two reasons are given for urging
a return to that, body: first, that Mich-
igan could then more adequately assist
in the fight for clean athletics; and
second, that such an action would re-
vivify interest in the various contests.
Resolutions have been received by va-
rious alumni bodies throughout the
country, and with the exception of the
association at Milwaukee, they are in
favor of an immediate return to the
conference.

11VresIY2tevitan Cburcb

10:30.---Address by Leonard A. Barrett.
Washington-Lincoln Memorial Service.

3 tltanta,3
BY
MRS. JAMES H. BREWSTER
Auspices Women's League, For Residential Hall Fund.
Sarah Caswell Angell Hall, February 18, 8 p. m. Fifty Cents.

L

L

I :oo.--University Bible Class.

I

I

6:3.-C. E.

Subject: Maximum Service.

Leader, Fred Smoyer.

- ' . uw3u u v l V l V U l G U i l R 1

ESBYTERIAN

DR. CHARLES W.

IuRCH

i

of CH'ScAno

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