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January 19, 1913 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-01-19

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4.

i Every Sunday Edition
of the Paper

The

Sunday Supplement
Michigan

Daily

Special Features, Exchanges
and Church Notices

iscopal Theological School'
CAMBRIDGE, MASS.
e location offers unequalled oppor-
ity for graduate work at Harvard
iversity. For catalogue address
AN HODGES.

MICHIGAN'S CAMPUS IS REPLETE WITH
MEMORIALS LEFT BY DEPARTING CLASSES

BUSINESS DIRECTORY
THERE HAS BEEN DEMAND ON PART OF THE MICHIGAN DAILY
READERS FOR A BUSINESS DIRECTORY WHICH WOULD REFER THEM
TO RELIABLE BOARDING HOUSES, REAL ESTATE FIRMS, INSUR-
ANCE AND PROFESSIONAL OFFICES, ETC. THE DAILY GIVES BE-
LOW A LIST OF SUCH RECOGNIZED FIRMS. THIS DIRECTORY WILL
APPEAR EVERY SUNDAY.

0RGE BISCHOFF
. .. Florist . .
CE CUT FLOWERS AND PLANTS
Chapin St. Both Phones

:1

TARIAN CHURCH

State cor. Huron.

R. S. LORINC, Minister
MORNINC SERVICE AT 10:30'
Subject:
The Modern Need of the Church
oung Peoples' Society at 7
Subject:
Hinduism; It's Corruption and
Reformation
Speaker
Mr. RAM K. KHOSLA

No class of students wishes to be
forgotten. When the diplomas have
been handed out and all has been
said and done, there yet remains a
wish that those who come after may
remember something of the ones who
have gone before. There are a num-
ber of practical evidences of this de-
ire upon the Michigan campus, where
memorials have been erected either by
out-going classes for themselves, or
by others in memory of men who have
been prominent in the history of the
university.
The memorial of which we hear the
most, perhaps, is the Tappan Oak,
which is held in special veneration by
all senior classes. This rugged, old
tree was given its name by the class
of 1858. The seniors of that year, in
order to supply the need for trees for
shade and ornamental purposes, set
out 48 maples in concentric circles
around a native oak, situated east of
,the old South Wing, each member
planting one tree. Most of the maples
are either dead or have been cut

down to make room for the library
building, but the "Tappan Oak" still
survives, as a memorial to Dr. H. P.
Tappan, first president of the univer-
sity, for whom it was named. °
The Tappan Oak and its encircling
trees are not the only ones, however,
which may serve as memorials on the
campus. As early as 1845, the first
class to graduate from the university
set out a number of trees in front of
the North Wing in the form of XLV;
and on the north side of the campus,
outside of the grounds, there is said
to be a large elm, placed there by
Prof. Ten Brook at a time when the
campus itself was planted in grain.
Later, according to Miss Farrand, who
has written a history of the univer-
sity, the classes of 1859 and 1860 also
sought to perpetuate their memory in
a bit of tree planting.
Occupying a very prominent posi-
tion on the campus, where there is no
danger of being overlooked, stands
another class memorial of a differ-
ent type, the "Big Stone," placed there]

by the class of '62. It was through the
suggestion of Dr. Alexander Winchell,
sometime professor of geology, that
the stone was brought there. It was
obtained near the depot and triumph-
antly deposited in an advantageous
position and the inscription, "The
Class of 1862," was placed upon it.
Another prominent rock memorial
on the campus is the "Calico Rock,"
planted by the class of '69 under the
elm tree in front of the South Wing.
And there is still another rock which
was planted by the class of '67-near
the one of '69-under an elm which is
known as the Haven Elm.
Standing between the "pebble" of
'62 and the Calico Rock, and facing
the walks leading to the main part
of University hall, there stood in olden
days a lead statue of Benjamin Frank-
lin. This statue was erected by the
class of 1870, and was a memorial-it
was said-to the high claim which
Franklin had and ought to have upon
the respect and admiration of the
American student. The statue of

BOARDING HOUSES
RESTAURANT
331 South Main St.
Regular Dinner 25c"
Lunches. Home-made Pies.
Chicken Dinner every Sunday.
CAMPUS CAFE
Why not board at a real Boarding
House?
Meals like those at home.
Conie to 911 N. University and be
convinced.
HOME COOKING
For small tables and good srvice go
to GREEN'S BOARDING HOUSE
Phone 9914.

REAL ESTATE AND INSURANCE
WARREN H. SMITH is the man
If you want to rent a fiat or house.
If you want insurance, the best of all
kinds.
312 National Bank Blk. Phone 1612.
. GAUNTLETT AND SELLMAN

Real Estate, Fire, Health
Casualty Insurance

110 E. Huron St.

Phone 180-L.

WARREN AGENCY
206 National Bank Bldg. Phone 303-J
Special Bargains in desirable places
for sale or rent.
Life, Accident and Fire Insurance. We
solicit correspondence or calls.

WAGNER AGENCY

L. D. CARR
Real Estate Agent
Savings Bank Block.. Phone 441.

104 N. Fourth Ave.

Bell 66014.117

Writc Ideas

For

Moving Picture

Plays !

Real Estate, Life, Fire, Accident
Insurance.

Specialty-residence property, houses
for sororities and fraternities.

YOU

CAN WRITE PHOTO PLAYS AND
EARN' $25 OR MORE WEEKLY

We Will Show You How!
If you have ideas-if you can THINK-we will show you-the
secrets of this fascinating new profession. Positively no experience
or literary excellence necessary. No "flowery language" is wanted.
The demand for photoplays is practically unlimited. The big
film manufacturers are moving "heaven and earth" in their at-
tempts to get enough good plots to supply the ever increasing de-
mand. They are offering $moo and more, for single scenarios, or
written ideas.
Nearly all the big film companies, the buyers of photoplays,
are located in or near NEW YORK CITY. Being right on the spot
and knowing at all times just what sort of plots are wanted by the
producers, our SALES DEPARTMENT has a tremendous advant-
age over agencies situated in distant cities,
We have received many letters from the big film manufactur-
ers, such as Vitagraph, Edison. Essanay, Lubin, Solax, Imp, Re-
liance. Champion, Comet, Melies, Etc., urging us to send photo-
plays to them. We want more writers and we'll gladly teach you
the secrets of success,
We are selling photoplays written by people
who "ncver before wrote a line of publication,"
Perhaps we can do the same for you. If you can think of only
one good idea each week, and will write it out as directed by us,
and it sells for only $25, a low figure,
You Will Earn $100 Monibly For Spare Time Work
FREE Send your name and address at once for free copy of
.ourillustrated book, "MOVING PICTURE PLAYWRITING."
Don't hesitate. Don't argue. Write now and learn just what
this new profession may mean for you and your future.

"Ben," however, was not given to a
life in perpetuity, for upon being filled
with cement one year, it tried to imi-
tate the toad in the fable, and with
the unsolicited aid of Jack Frost cool-
ly swelled up and busted.
Near the center of the campus, a
short distance north from the library,
stands what is known technically, if
not popularly, as the cenotaph. This
monument was erected in 1845 in
memory not of the living, but of the
dead. How many of those who have
looked on the broken, lonesome col-
umn, with its sombre background of
.evergreens, have stopped to find out
about the men whose names are here
inscribed? There are four tablets on
the base of the column, each with a
Latin inscription, bearing the names
of Joseph Whiting, Douglass Hough-
ton, Carolus Fox, and Samuel Den-
ton. Prof. Whiting was one of the
earliest members of the university
faculty, and his death occurred just
before graduation in 1845. Houghton
has been called "Michigan's first
geologist." He was a young man of
exceptional brilliance and ability and
came to an untimely end in 1845, be-
ing drowned October 13, 1845, in Lake
Superior. Charles Fox was the first
and only professor of agriculture
Michigan ever had. After his death,
which occurred less than two years
after his appointment, the establish-
ment of the agricultural college took
away the necessity of such a depart-
ment here. Dr. Denton was profes-
sor of the theory and practice of med-
icine from 1850 to 1860, and was also
a member of the first board of re-
gents. He died in 1860.
Another of the very earliest class
memorials, still traceable, is the copy
of the famous Laocoon group, now
displayed iri the Alumni Memorial
hall. In 1863 the senior law class was
instrumental in framing and preserv-
ing facsimiles of the "Magna Charta"
and the "Warrant to Execute Charles
the First," which were the gifts of
Prof. A. D. White, and can now be
seen in the faculty room of the law
building.
The class of 1866 had an eye for
beauty, and left behind it a copy of
Murillo's famous Madonna. This pic-
ture hangs in Prof. Arthur L. Cross'
office in Memorial hall.
To the laws of '66 one record rather

vaguely attributes a "Likeness of
Lincoln," the whereabouts of which
could not be learned.
The memorial of 1871 has the fol-
lowing interesting history. Says the
"Chronicle" of that date: "After ma-
ture deliberation, disregarding the
suggestions of castiron bull dogs
painted blue, big pudding stone,
the Cardiff Giant, etc., the committee
[on the memorially reported in favor
of procuring a bronze statue, the
'Hunter in Repose' from Paris. The
money was subscribed and the order
sent; but unfortunately the 'late un-
pleasantness' between 'Louis Nap. and
Kaiser Bill' interfered with our plans,
and the 'Hunter' is supposed to be still
enjoying his repose in the midst of the
Paris mob." The class did leave a
memorial, however, in the shape of a
painting called "Beatrice."
The class of 1872 originated the plan
for starting an alumni fund for the
benefit of the university, and, through
generous contributions, helped to car-
ry the idea into immediate execution.
Though not officially recognized as
such, "The Yellow and Blue," which
was written by Charles M. Gayley, a
member of the clas's of '78,'will ever
be a living memorial to that class.
The 1882 law class decided to vary
the class picture idea-which inci-
dentally has been continued, with the
exception of '82, '83, '92, and '93, and
contributed a class book for a memen-
to. The book consisted of an intro-
ductory history of the class, and biog-
raphies of faculty and class members.
Portraits have now become the
fashion. The 1891 law class left a
portrait of William P. Wells in the li-
brary of the law building. 1892-the
portrait of Prof. C. I. Walker.
A class scholarship was recorded
by the literary class of '94.
'95 left a bust of President-Emeritus
James B. Angell, which stands in the
reading room of the general library.
The law class of '95 left a bust of
Judge Thomas M. Cooley. This bust
is in the reading room of the law li-
brary.
The literary class of 1896 selected
the "Arch of Trajan" as its class mem-
orial. This memorial was a particu-
larly valuable and striking one, and
was installed after no end of difficulty
in the upper hall of the Memorial
(Continued ou page 2)

N

1543 Broadway
New York City

INS TITUTE

U
U
U

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............

January

Clearance Sale

Everything Reduced at

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