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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 18, 1913 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

mething in it for Every Man
who Wears

PANTS

We are making a reduction of $
r trouserings-=$6.00 now $5.00,
.00, etc. We have also reduced

1.00 on all
$10.00 now
our .Over=

ratings 10%. It will pay you to come in and
ee our offerings.
Let us reserve a choice pattern from our New Spring
'oolens fsr future delivery.

J. Carl Malcolm,

4 East Street,

Ann Arbor

-

he Cbuhbb House
209 So~jth Mtate street

Gives Clean, Wholesome Board at

$4.00 per Week.
Water.

Safe Drinking

C. C. Fre rnakn, Proprietor

=11

ben r* 3 &
THE HOUSE OF STANDARD QUALITY
Designers of Men's Clothes

university work during the coming
summer $52,841.24 was provided by
the board. This is an increase of
$2,695 over last year's budget. De-
tails of the budget will be printed in
another issue of The Michigan Daily.
Provision was made for the publica-
tion of 1,000 copies of the "Forester,"
the organ of the forestry department,
and also of a small leaflet dealing with
forestry information which is often,
sought by the people of the state.
The board voted $50.00 for concur-
rence in the publication of the Ameri-
can Mathematical Monthly to which
practically all of the middle western
universities contribute.
The matter of securing a permanent
successor to Prof. Alexander Craig
of the semetics department, was re-
ferred to the executive committee.
Meanwhile J. L. French will be con-
tinued as acting assistant professor
in the department and will continue
his courses in Hebrew.
The resignation of Harry L. Tanner
as instructor in electrical engineering
was accepted' to take effect at once.
Provision was made for another in-
structor in chemical engineering for
the coming semester, but no appoint-
ment was made. C. G. Crump was ap-
pointed as instructor in astronomy for
the second semester at a salary of
$125. Gilbert H. Taylor was made
instructor in Latin for the second sem-
ester to take the place of Prof. Henry
Sanders, who is absent on leave. His
salary will be paid by Prof. Sanders.
The board received with thanks the
renewed gift of Hon. George Shires
3rd of $100 for field work on the part
of the museum.
Go. Woodbridge N. Ferris who was
here to preside at the Chicago-Michi-
gan debate attended.
Evening Session.
A committee consisting of Regents
Sawyer and Beal, President H. B.
Hutchins, Deans J. R. Effinger, V. C.
Vaughan and Mortimer E. Cooley was
appointed by the board to recommend
a solution for the controversy between
the literary and medical departments.
The committee is to report at the next
meeting of the board and a decision
will be reached at that time.
The difficulties between the literary
and forestry departments were also
settled when the regents decided to
make an exception of forestry stu-
dents regarding the group system of
studies which was recently adopted
by the lit department. This was the
bone of contention between the two
departments.
Authorization was made for the pur-
chase of a large auto truck. This will
be used for all the drayage in behalf
of the university both in collecting
freight from the depots and in distrib-
uting the same from the new univer-
sity store house in the "cat-hole" to
the various university buildings.
The inventory of university build-
ings, grounds, materials and equip-
ment for the yeartending June 30,1912,
was accepted by the, regents. The re-
port was compiled by Herman Greve
who has been made permanent inven-
tory clerk of the university, from ma-'
terial furnished by the university
books and the various department
heads. The volume shows property
owned by the university as follows: .
Real Estate..........$432,690.00
Buildings ........... $2,707,442.72
Equipment, materials3
on hand..........$1,532,584.891

lumbus, Ohio. A degree of L.L.B. as
of 1908 was given to Volney J. Tidball,
an attorney of Laramie, Wyoming.
PAINTED WINDOW OUT TODAY.
Popular Campus Magazine Contains
Many Stories and Poems
of Interest.
Featuring a story entitled "A Matter
of Rank" by an unknown author, us-
ing the initials F. B., te January num-
ber of the Painted Window will make
its appearance today. Leonard L.
Cline also contributes an exciting tale
with the caption, "The Luring Waters"
and "My Own Time" by Ruth Mary
Weeks is also contained in the num-
ber. There are chapters in the com-
bined stories by F. P. Redmond and
Edgar A. Mowrer.
Among the poems are "Now" by
Ruth Mary Weeks, "A Story in Cap
and Bells" by Edward Everett, and
"Life Ironies" by W. R. Melton.
Many Will Attend Fresh Lit Dance.
According: to the ticket sale, about
300 will attend the fresh lit party this
afternoon. More tickets have been
sold to women than to men. There
are about 35 of the pasteboards yet un-
sold and these will be disposed of at
the door.
Prof. Florer to Give Second Lecture.
The second of the series of German
lectures to be given by the department
of German will be given next Wed-
nesday afternoon, January 22 in the
economics lecture room, when Prof.
W. W. Florer will speak on "The Ger-
man Student." The lecture will be
open to the pu lic.
MICHIGAN TRIO GETS DECISION
OVER CHICAGO.
(Continued from page 1.)
shard, '14; and S. H. Conrad, gradu-
ate school.
The Judges were Prof. 3. A. Leigh-
ton, of Ohio State University; and
Judges J. A. Barber and L. W. Morris,
of Toledo. W. W. Schroeder, '14, and
J. W. Hoover acted as time keepers
for Michigan and Chicago, respective-
ly.
"It was the most interesting debates
I ever heard," said Gov. Ferris. "I
liked it especially for its clearness,
cleanness, and its spirit of good fel-
lowship." Judge Barber, who has act-
ed in a large number of these debates
said, "It was the best of the debates
I have ever heard here."
An interesting feature of the even-
ing was the presence of J. W. Hoover
as the Chicago timekeeper. He has
the distinction of being a member tf
the only Chicago team which ever de-
feated Michigan in Ann Arbor, which
was in 1909. "The reason Chicago
lost the debate was because she gam-
bled on one point-the control of bus-
iness by the association. Blanshard
is a wonderful speaker,' he said.
SERVICE TO BE HELD IN HONOR
OF WEDEMEYER.

A

By J. M. Barrie, author of "The Little Min-
ister." Seat Sale, Friday, Jan. 17th.

I

Peter

I

51

Fire

Sale

NEW WHITNEY THEATRE

Monday, Jan. 20th, at 8:00
Charles Frohman Presents
Maude Adams

Pan

In her Most Famous Success

UNTIL

ALL STOCK IS SOLD

E.

R.

FROST

Y&CO.

711 N. University

302 S. State*Street

m

-

20 Per Cent Off

Flannel Shirts---Attached or Detached Collars
Underwear--Wool or Cotton, union or 2-piece
25 Per Cent. off on all Winter Caps

VARSITY TOGGERY SHOP
1107 S. University Ave.

A CAMPHOR COLD CREAM
We want to call your attention to a brand new toilet preparation. We
refer to Rexalt Camphorated Cold Cream-It has all the healing, cool-
ing and soothing properties of camp hor. It is not a camphor ice-hut
a pure white cold cream in which camphor has been incorporated with
delightfully pleasing results. This is just the time of year to use it for
chapped or irritated skin and all discomforts resulting from cold winds
and weather. GUARANTEED TO PLEASE OR YOUR MONEY BACK. PRICE 25c
The Rexail Drug Store
IM. C. EDSILL, Props-letor
122 S. Main Street Preucription Speeialists
See the World's Star Hosiery
"r'HE KIND THAT WEARS"
Beauty and Strength Combined. Agency at 6265E. Liberty
Gertrude L. Rudd Groves Bldg., cor.State and Liberty. Entrance on Lib.
-erty, Up Stairs, Rtoom i. PHONK 539-.

WATCH

FOR

The

e mple

REGENTS MET YESTERDAY IN
LONG SESSIONS.
(Continued from page 1.)
gardens.
Harry W. Crane resigned as assist-
ant in sociology and was appointed
instructor in psychology. He will take
charge of the work of Prof. W. B.
Pillsbury, who is on leave of absence
for the next semester.
The board ratified the presenting of
the Henry W. Strong scholarship to
Robert Sturtevant and Francis N.
Bradford.
The auditor general of the state,
who recently made an examination of
the books of the treasurer of the uni-
versity, notified the regents that they
were in good condition.
The regents authorized the investing
of $9,000 of the university gift funds
in four mortgages in Kansas City.
These mortgages were reported upon
favorably by Charles Baird, former
athletic director of the university. The
board also invested $12,000 in the mu-
nicipal bonds of Paris, Texas.
The following gifts were received
with thanks by the regents: R. Olds'
gift of $300 for honor men in debates;
the Bryant Walker collection of 9,000
seashells and the Bradshaw H. Swailes
collection of 500 valuable birdskins.
Mrs. Theodore H. Buell continued her
gift of $500 scholarships in Latin and
Greek.
Afternoon Session.
At the afternoon session the budget
for the summer session of 1913 was
passed. For the carrying on of thel

MAIN STREET

I

Grand Total......$4,672,717.61
The plan for the administration of
the graduate school was approved and
the board recommended that hereaf-
ter graduate degrees be given by au-'
thorization of the graduate school in-
stead-of by the literary department
which has been previously the case.
The petition of the Painted Window
that its magazine be sent out to the
high schools 'of the state was denied
by the regents.
The leave of absence granted to
Harold B. Breitenbach, instructor, was
continued through the second semes-
ter, and Glenn D. Bradley will re-
main as his substitute.
An A.B. degree as of the class of
1890 was conferred on Charles E. All-
bright of the North High School, Co-

r
1
i
t
1

(Continued from page 1.)
ington Saturday night and arrive here
early Sunday morning.
The committee in charge of arrange-
ments consists of Judge Kinne, Pro-
bate Judge Murray, V. E. Van Amer-
ingen, Prof. Knowlton, Prosecuting
Attorney Burke, Carl Storn and Arthur
Brown.
Printed circulars will be distributed
within a few days announcing the W.
W. Wedemeyer Memorial scholarship
fund which is being subscribed to by
friends of the Wedemeyer family
throuhgout the entire country. It is
expected that a sum of $10,000 will
be raised, so that the interest may be
used each year in paying part of a stu-
dent's expenses in either the law or
.he lit-law course of the university.
The memorial fund committee is
composed of V. E. Van Ameringen,
Frank C. Cole, Otto Haab, Dewey M.
Forshee, Jacob Fahrner, John Kalm-
bach, of Chelsea; Tracy L. Towner, of
Ypsilanti, and George Wright, of Mil-
an.

Ferris Is Friendly to Universi

venty-five Couples Dance at Union.
With 75 couples present, the Colum-
s Saxophone Trio played at the see-
I of the Union saxophone dances last
;ht. The last dance' of the series
1 be held February 26.

"I believe there are ways of more
effective service than talking about
the university," said Governor Ferris,
when asked why there was no refer-
ence to the institution in his inaugu-
ral message. "The women also asked
me why I did not mention woman suf-
frage, and I answered them in the
same way. Neither did I mention the
prisons, but I am deeply interested in
all of these things. I only dwelt upon
matters of constructive policy.
"If the university grows to its great-
est possibilities there will be no neces-

SOPH LITS TO HAVE SECOND
1)INNER OF SERIES MONDAY
The second of a series of dinners
will be held by the soph lit class next
Monday night at the Union at 5:30
o'clock sharp. Tickets, selling for
50 cents, may be obtained from mem-
bers of the committee. It is urged that
all planning to go buy tickets at once,
as the Union must De notinen by Sun-
day evening as to the number that will
attend.

GARRICK, Detroit
DeWOLF HOPPER in
The Gilbert and Sullivan
Festival Company
GREAT CAST OF GREAT STARS
Gargoyle Will Make Blue Books Easy.
Exam difficulties will be made easy
in the Gargoyle which appears to-
day. The book offers avdcie in any
exigency which may be encountered
in writing blue books.

sity for me to worry," he went on. -f
am most deeply interested in all of
our educational institutions."
Woodbridge N. Ferris has a keen
sense of humor. Entering the dean's
office where the debaters were gather-
ed in readiness to ascend to the plat-
form last night he at once relieved
the tension by his quaint remarks.
Turning to the reporter in the cor-
ner, who in his mackinaw was quite
a contrast to the evening dress of the
speakers and officials, he asked: "And
what are you here for, to rub them
down?"

._..

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to

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i

F. W. GROSS,

=

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iberty

Exclusive Local Representative of Ed. W. Price & Co., Merchant Tailors, Chicago

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