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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 18, 1913 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY.

OYS we want you to see our
'lat English Custom- Lasts the
itest with the new flat 7-8 inch
in black and tan, light or heavy
t, $5 to $7 per pair.
.urf ield's"
119 S. MAIN STREET'

lo
sY0

We have the largest stock of best fitting pumps you ever
oh $4.00, $4.50 and $5.00 per pair.

iX

P epace of Sweets
Down Town
LET
TRVBET
F,%r ish the Ice Creas

, 7?r-- -j-

Attention to Frasternities
grnd Serorities
ON MAIN STREET

epadrira~

Phone 1361-L

t or beat any price made on a typewriter, sale or rental.
D. F. WOODWARD
mings Bank Bldg, Second Floor Ann Arbor, Mich.

11

F. DE MURALT INVENTS
LECTRICAL HEATING DEVICE.
'ofessor Carl de Muralt of the
trical engineering department has
completed the invention of an
trical heating device to displace
coal stove or furnace. It is said to
very simple contrivance, which
slike an ordinary hot water boiler
which Professor de Muralt be-
es will revolutionize the heating
elem.
de electrical current required is to
ised only during the hours of the
when it is not needed for lighting
consequently an excess supply is
lable. It seems probable that the
trio companies will readily make
eaper rate for current during this
than is charged for lighting. Sur-
electricity which could be pro-
d at a very low cost would be util-
by this excess demand. Then the
ent so secured would be stored
or use during the hours when the
ent is needed for lighting pur-
s. It is this heat-storing apparat-
rhich Prof. de Muralt has given to
world.
ie user of one of these storage in-
ients would simply turn on the
ch some time during the time
n lighting rates were not on and
ould automatically be disconnect-
when the light schedule of prices
ted. The house would then be fur-
ed with the heat from the accumu
d supply.
rofessor de Muralt is one of theI
known electrical engineers in
country and itrwas he who elec-
ed the Simplon tunnel in Switzer-
1. The invention will probably be
ed on the market as soon as the
n rights are secured.
RSHMENTS CONTRACT FOR
J-1OP WILL BE LET TODAY.
nior hop plans are gradually be-
completed. In nearly every de-
ment the big 1914 event will be
improvement over last year. The
.ract for refreshments will be let
,y to Mrs. M. 0. Smith, of Detroit,
of the best caterers in the state,
details of the contract in regard
he exact method of serving, will be
ded upon today when the agree-
.t is made by L. F. Campbell, chair-
. of the arrangements committee.'
he music to be furnished by the
Ter orchestra and Finzel band, will
featured by a series of flash and
I lights to be installed and oper-
1 by special electricians accompa-
ig the orchestras.

CERCLE FRANCAIS LECTURE
GIVEN TUESDAY AFTERNOON
M. Percival Fay will lecture in Tap-
pan hall at 5:00 o'clock Tuesday af-
ternoon on Gustave Flaubert's "Sa-'
lammbo." The lecture is offered on
the regular course of the Cercle Fran-
cais, and the associate membership
tickets will admit.. Dr. Fay is one of
the newest members of the French
department, coming from Johns Hop-
kins where he has made a special
study of Flaubert and his work.
Fifty Couples Dance at Harris Hall.
Episcopal students gathered at Har-
ris hall last night for the regular
Hobart Guild party. The evening was
spent in dancing, after which refresh-
ments were served. About 50 couples
were present.
COLLEGE PRESIDENT WILL
TALK TO CHINESE STUDENTS
President Charles Paul of the Col-
lege of Missions, Indianapolis, Indiana,
will deliver the sixth of a'series of the
religious lectures before the Chinese
Students' club Sunday at 4:00 o'clock
in McMillan hall.
President Paul is one of the noted
authorities in this country on the sub-
ject of Christian work in foreign
lands. He has been in China for two
years, and his experience as an active
wvorker in the missionary field there
makes him especially qualified to talk
on questions of religious advancement
in the young republic.
Engineering Shops Make Chronoscope
The engineering shops have just fin-
ished making two chronoscopes, one
for the University of Kansas and one
for an alumni engineering firm in
Chicago. This instrument measures
small intervals of time, and has been
applied to ascertaining the velocity of
projectiles. It was employed at one
time by the ordinance department of
the experimental firings at Fortress
Monroe, to determine the time occu-
pied by a ball in passing from one tar-
get to another.
Fitzpatrick to Remain at Princeton.
Keene Fitzpatrick, Michigan's form-
er trainer, has signed a contract with
the Princeton Athletic association to
continue his services with that col-
lege. The terms of the contract are
not definitely known but it is said that
the association will keep him as long
as he will stay.

GRADUATE AUTHOR
VISITS ANN ARBOR
Wilkie Nelson Collins, '05, who since
graduation has achieved fame in Eng-
land as an author and literary critic
is back in Ann Arbor for a few days.
He has been recently engaged in trans-
lating the novels of the French writer,
Gaston Leroux, bet has nevertheless
found time to devote himself to a num-
ber of original works of his own. A
novel dealing with life in Michigan's
upper peninsula, and a collection of
descriptive prose and verse of the
American Merchant marine, are two
volumes which will soon be published
under his name. He is also engaged
in writing a book dealing with the
novel and English democracy from
1860 to 1910.
"There is a marked tendency toward
the sex novel of one direct single situ-
ation," said Mr. Collins in discussing
recent English fiction. "The detective
novel which for 10 years has been al-
most the leading feature of French
and English popular reading is giving
away to this new subject.
"One of the rather new men who
promises to be a permanent figure in
the development of the English novel
is Mr. J. D. Beresford. Two of his
books are "The Early History of Jacob
Stahl" and "A Candidate for Truth."
These two books are part of a triology
of which the final volume will appear
in the coming year.
"By all odds the most interesting
writer of short stories in Miss Ten-
nyson Jesse., A year and a half ago
the English Review published her first
short story and her work since that
time has come up to the expectations
aroused. .She is a daughter of that
sister of Alfred Tennyson who was to
have married Arthur Hallam.
"Joseph Conrad has a steady widen-
ing circle of readers, and is confirm-
ing his position as perhaps the fore-
most artist in the novel of the last
decade. He is a Pole who became a
naturalized Englishman in order to
work as a sea captain. After 25 years
in the China trade he is proving his
supreme mastery both of subject mat-
ter and of English style.
"On the side of books whose sheer
story makes a popular success, a novel
called "The Man from Nowhere" by
Victor Bridges, a new writer, will un-
doubtedly be one of the big successes
of the autumn of 1913.
"There is no doubt that American
writers of novels and . short stories
have a.steadily increasing audience in
England."
Papyrus Paper on Exhibit at Library.
A series of fac similes and samples
of writing materials, illustrating the
lectures on the history of books given
in the course in bibliography is now
being shown in the east corridor of
the general library. The exhibit con-
sists of illustrations of the four chief
writing materials which have been
employed in history. That illustrating
papyrus paper gives a representation
of the original plant, a tufted head, or
stalk, from Syracuse, Sicily; a piece
of the stalk from which the paper is
made, and a specimen of the paper
itself.
NE W YORK ALUMNI ATTEPT
TO INCREASE MEMBERSHIP.
To increase the membership of the
University of Michigan club of New
York city is the aim of the board of
governors of that organization. The
present membership is less than one

half the total number of Michigan
alumni living in New York City.
During the month of December more
than 50 new names were added. At
a banquet to be held January 24, each
member of the club has been request-
ed to bring a new member.
Mathematics 22 is Now 3-Hour Course
Mathematics, course 22, advanced
differential and integral calculus, will
be offered as a 3-hour course. First
meeting Monday, February 10, at 3:00
p. m. .in room 110, T. H.

NEW YORK ALUMNI
BANQUET FRIDAY
Michigan Men at Metropolis to Hold
Fifteenth Dinner at
Astor Hotel.
PRES. HUTCIHINS WILL ATTEND.
Michigan alumni of New York will
meet for the fifteenth annual dinner
of the club at the Astor hotel January
24, at 6:30 o'clock.
President Harry B. Hutchins has
been invited as the guest of honor.
"Let us greet President Hutchins with
the cheers and songs of three hundred
Michigan men, linked to each other
and to dear old Michigan in a common
bond of love and obligation," says the
committee in charge of the banquet.
That he may attend the annual ban-
quet of the Washington alumni asso-
ciation, ;which will be held January
23, President Hutchins will leave Mon-
day afternoon.
Others to appear on the New York
program are Bishop Charles S Burch,
'75, who delivered the baccalaureate
address here last year; Prof. Jere-
miah W. Jenks, '79, who gave the com-
mencement address last June; and Col.
Henry C. Prout, '79. Gov. Ferris was
invited as a special guest, but he will
be unable to attend. ,
Those having charge of the dinner
are the president of the association,
E. D. Babst, '93; E. C. Worden, '98;
H. E. Chickering, '94; A. D. McGraw,
'92; R. C. Taggart, '97; and R. L. Bige.
low, '05.
Griffins to Hold Luncheon Today.
The regular monthly meeting of the
Griffins will be held today in the form
of luncheon at the Michigan Union.
Drs. J.H.Drake and H.T.A.Hus will be
present and all busienss of the club
will be discussed.
PUCKSTERS RUDELY CHECKED
BY THAWING OF ICE RINKS.
Weather Man Prevents the Opening
Game of Winter Sport Set
for Today.
Hockeyites are up in arms. On the
eve of the first battle the weather man
reversed his decision and decided to
further delay the crooked stick wield-
ers from initiating the new Ferry field
rinks.
The weather's failure to join in the
winter sport comes at a most inop-
portune time, as the teams have just
begun to limber up their joints and all
indications look as if the hockey fol-
lowers would see some "real live reg-
ular" exhibitions of hockey. The game
between the lits and science teams
which was booked for today will be
played at a later date which will be
announced in The Daily.
Series of Lectures Coming.
"How the Other Half Lives," will be
the subject of two lectures given by
the Y. M. C. A. in Newberry hall Sat-
urday evening at 8:00 o'clock, and
Sunday afternoon at 4:30 o'clock, to
which the public is invited. The lec-
tures, which will be followed during
the next few weeks by others of a se-
ries supplied by the S. C. A., are to be
illustrated by stereopticon views.
Prof. Sunderland Publishes Text Book
Work on Prof. E. R. Sunderland's
book "Cases on Code Pleading" is pro-
gressing. As the proof has all been
corrected, the book will be ready for'
use next semester. This is the au-
thor's second volume in his series of

procedure, and has been thoroughly
annotated.
Death Slowly Overtaking Senior Medic
Martin Judy '13M, who is suffering
from a form of blood poisoning, con-
tinues to grow weaker. His condition
last night was practically the same
as during the day, but he is slowly
succumbing to the disease, and it is
only a question of time before death
results.

W)? We charge more than some for our cleaning.
w OUR WORK IS BETTER. No Odor. Try us.
CJe. EPrip and Dyeg Works
J. A. GREY, Proprietor. Tel. 16584-L

- Y YOUR clothes should be right
and you may be thankful that
there is a store in your midst where
you can get clothes that fit, and
have style and workmanship guar-
*'janteed. Prices $10.00 to $25.00
Sfor Suitor Overcoat.

I

Furnishings, Rats, C a p s,
Bags and Suitcases.
Mackinaws
Jo F VWVUERTO"H
COMPANY

U ,

I

bpmI II?..
ALFRED DECKER M COHN

711 Packard St.

92:. N. Vniv. Ave.
Work Called for and Delivered.

I

An up-to date showing of
Haviev's illinery Fall Millinery at. popular
prices. Hair Goods a
specialty. Bell Phone 1390-J B. B. HAYLEY, 206 E. Liberty Street

w

I

I

THEATRE COMIQUE THOMAS. A. MEAD, Prop.
E Admission 5e.
Grand 2 Reel Picture
Saturday, Jan. 18th, 1913
"Old Mam'selle's Secret"
from the famous Novel by EUGENE MARLITT-and other
interesting pictures. Latest spotlight songs by Miss Fisher.
Continuous Performance 1:30 to 6:30; 6:30 to 11 P. M.

r F'<
k.'.
sC
5; "

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k'
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>;.I

PORTO RICO ALUMNI BANQUET
CONGRESSMAN D. E. ANTHONY
Michigan alumni in Porto Rico re-
cently tendered Congressman D. E.
Anthony, '91L, of Kansas, a banquet,
which was attended by graduates from
all parts of the island. Toasts were
given by President del Valle of the
Alumni Association. Dr. Barbosa and
Dean Fleagle, of the University of
Porto Rico. Representative Anthony
responded with a brief address. Mich-
igan songs were a feature of the oc-
casion.
SYRACUSE WOMEN STUDENTS
TO LIMIT CALLING IHOURS
Four hundred women students at
Syracuse have voluntarily adopted a
constitution providing for their self-
government which will go into effect
February 1. The new code sets aside
only two evenings a week for men
callers, and even then the hours are
limited from 7:30 to 10:00. Lastly no
girl will be allowed to enter a down-
town hotel or restaurant after 6:00
o'clock without a chaperone.
ADS IN THIS COLUMN ARE TO BE
PAID FOR IN ADVANCE.
LOST.
Lost-Bunch of keys in Sarah Cas-
well Angell hall or near Barbour
gym. Finder call 1370-L. 79
Lost-A brown wallet in or about the
gymnasium. Reward. Phone 63.
Lost-A tan glove, Fowne make. Find-
er phone 1408-W.
Regular Assembly at Granger's to-
night.

* * * * * * * *
LOST WHAT?
-0-
Was it ValuableI
Was it Serviceablel
Do you miss it?
Would you like to find it?

* *

*

The little busy two-bit adlet
goes into nearly every house in
Ann Arbor. The chance to find
it means the use of the adlet.
-0-
TRY THE MICHIGAN DAILY
WANT AD COLUMN.
* * * * * * * * * \*

*

The best guitar or mandolin for you
to buy is made by the world's famed
Martin factory. See *and try these
beautiful instruments at Schaeberle
& Son's Music House.
We sharpen all makes of safety razor
blades. H. L. Switzer Co., 310 S. State.
tf
We can give you the best service on
strings for all Musical Instruments.
Grinnell Bros., 120-122 E. Liberty St.
tf
Full Dress Tuxedo, and Prince Al-
bert Suits for Hire. Whittinger Co.,
244 Woodward Ave., Detroit. e o d
We are never undersold. Goodyear
Drug Store. 2 tf
FOR SALE
For Sale-Kimball piano, mahogany
case,'good as new. Cost $425. Sell
for $200. Liberal commission allow-
ed. Phone 544-L, or call 1430 Hill
street.

e Big. Store

Reule, Conlin, Fiegel Co.

As a young men's store aims to keep in close, constant touch with its clientele absorbing the ideas and studying the individual tastes of alert and progressive young fellows
who regard correct attire as an asset in social and business life. Autumn's finest in Furnishings

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, specialshowing at........... ........................................ .
xceptional values at........ ...............$1S0 and up to $2.50
ost unusual values, at......... ......................................$1.00

Manhattan, headquarters for these famous Shirts............ ...........$1.50 to $4
Hosiery, extra strong showing at,................................................25c,
Great values in Fall Underwear.............................................$1 to $6
200-202 Soixth Medrv

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