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November 24, 1912 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAIL-Y

SABBATHI SUGGESTIONS
'hie Rev. Robert S. Loring will take
the subject of his serzmon this
rning 'at the Unitarian church:
he Decreasing Size of Our Uni-
se." At 7:0.0 p. ini the Young Peo-
's Religious union meets in thei
irch parlors, the address to be giv-
by Dr. Carl E. Parry of the econom-i
~department of the university, on
GEORGE BISCHiOFF
..Florist ..F1
CHOICE CUT FLOWERS AND PLANTS
228 Chapin St. Both Phones

"The Woman Suffrage Movement in
England,"
Servicbs at the Baptist church this
morning will, be conducted by the
Rev. Frank Bachelor, subject: "The
Boundless Goodness of God." Asst.
pastor N. C. Fetter, Jr., will address
the Guild class at noon on "Christian-
ity': its Forerunners." The Young
People's meeting at 6:30 p. m. will be
led by sophomores and seniors.
"Back to Christ" ,will be the subject
of the Rev. L. A. Barrett's sermon this
} Y

morning at the. Presbyterian church.
Bible classes are held at noon for
students.

I

The Rev. Elliott, D.ZD., of Bay City,
one of the best known Methodist min-
isters in the country, will occupy the
pulpit of the Methodist church, this
city, this morning. His subject will
be: "America 'for Christ,." In the
evening, the Rev. A. V. Stalkier, will
deliver his second sermon in the series
of "The Personal Religion of Great
Men." He will take for his sub je ct
tonight: "Tolstoi, Christianity in
Earnest." Boible classes will be con-
ducted at noon by the pastor and Airs.
Stalker for university ien and
womten.
At St. Andrew's Episcopal church
this morning, the services will be con-
ducted by the Rev. Nelson R. Stearly,
of St. Luke's church, M lount Clair,
N. J. Bible classes for university stu-
dents will be held at noon, led by the
assistant pastor, W. 0. Raymond, an d
M rs. G. W . Patterson. Evening serv;i wl aso b c nd te by le ce.
Stearly, wvho will take for his tee
"The TDiffcilties and Advantag;es of
Faith." This sermon is one of those
given in the union series.
At the Church of Christ this mnorn.
ing, the Rev. George Knepper will hold
serv~ices, his subject being: "A' Ro-
mance of Two Worlds."
T.Ihe pulpit at the Congregational
church will be filled this morning by
the new pastor, the Rev. Frank M.
Sheldon, of Madison, Wis.

TAR IAN CHURCH
State cor. Huron.
S. LORINO, Minister
NING SERVICE AT: 10:30
Sub ject.
Decreasing Size of J
Our Modern Universe
rg Peoples' Society at 7
Subjct:.
Woman Suffrage
Movement in England
Speaker
DR. C. E. PARRY

IA 'Lox of sclcc-ted Chocolates
that touches top notch in
candy making,
FUSSY PACKAGER
-'or Fastidious Folks
tt Calkins' Pharmacy
ax,, ~324 S,. State St..0

At

T'he

"'rom

You. will preserve the permanency of your
social position and inns ure constant recogni-
tion aacorcdrsr fyour dress clothes
are made by tailors who understand your
Asthe 1-1ly merchar t
tailors main-taininig'a
separate shop of experts
whose entire time is delvo ted tmeeting; these
excting denandgs 4+e arce-, to2deliver
exceptionally iow 3ri'e . MIaL zey-bLr
1requiiYrcijann-J ow t'7,7o urlo c.l.1dealci,

All/
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..l h ^ yf~l '
.\ Sr . yNC ( Sy i
al,; \ 4

ADMIT ONLY BEST
STUDENTS TO ELLM
DEA 13 BVI ES EXPLAI~tNS EXTRA
YEAR (OF LAWV WORK LEAH.
ENGt TO ADVANCED
DEGRE.
The fourth year of work, leading to
the degree of Mlaster of Laws, which
was organized in the department of
law last year, is now open and a few
students have already been admitted
to the course.
"There hae been a lare numbr
of applications to the course this
.;eas;'' said Dean Bates, "but many of
thema came from students who had
receaived the degree of LL.B. in law
schools which we could not recognize
as properly fitting students for this
cou"trse.
".The course was organized largely
'because the expanding field of la,
to gther with the more thorough meth-
ods of instruction required by present
condiions, made it impossible for a
student to cover anything like all of
the important subjects in law in three
years. While it is not necessary that
law students cover the entire field,
still it is desirable that those of them
who have the time to do so s~ould
be liven the opportunity. The course
is of especial advantage also to stu-
dents who enter the department of
law with only the minimum entrance
renuirements, and who therefore profit
by an additional year of mental dis-
TIhe course is open to students hold-
ing the degree of LL.B. granted by
the University of Michigan, or by any
approved law shool with hnigh stand-
ards of entrance requirements and of
work, provided the applicant for ad-
mission has maintained a high stand-
ardl of scholarship in the law school
fro:n which he obtained his first de-
gre ,~ Students coming from other
schools mnust present certificates there-
fromt showing in detail the courses
takn and the sholarship grades ob-
tained; and they must in ~ddition pre-
sent a statement from the dean r
othr officer of such school to the
effect that the applicant is qualified to,
pursue further work in law and is
recommended therefor. Graduates
fromn the law department here will e
admitted as candidates for the degree
of IL.M.I only upon obtaining permis-
a~oU 01' the (elea. Students whose
worl has been poor or mediocre will
not be admitted.
C"andidates for this deree mst
take not less than 10 nor more than
12 :hours of work each semester. This
work miay. be mae up of courses in
the department of law, for which the
student has niot already received cred-
it, if he be a graduate of Michigan,
or of which he has not had the equiva-
lent, if he be n graduate of any other
law school. All candidates for the
degrce are required to take the cour-
ses in Roman aw and in the science
of jurisprudence, provided they have
not. already had such courses.
The student may elect 0 per cent of
his work from such courses offered
by the other departments of the uni-
vers-ity s are directly connected with
or collateral to the law. Such courses
as those in public international law,
constitutional history ofEngland and
of the United States and certain other
courses in political science and i
political economy are of the type pre-
ferred.
,.It w ill be seen that this work is not
strictly graduate wr," said the dean,
"fo0r most of the courses are courses
ofered in the undergraduate depart
meats. By limitin-g the hours of work
to a maximum of 12, it is proposed,
however, to permit and require the

student to do more thorough and in-
tensive worick than undergraduate stu-
dents-do, and the courses in Roman
law, science of jurisprudence, and
wvork elected from the other depart-
ments, will tend to give a breadth of
viewr and of, scholarship much to be
desired. No lawyer can hope to be a
lader in the development of law and
thec advancement of his profession who
is without imsight into some of the
great questions in p~olitical economy
and political science which are be-
fore the country today,

[i
rt yp , rl F I n S
I fi a '1 f y? -
1 ' +
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th 'I 1' qursti nw sin d fia n
ing fioni (te fa , t est .aI ,
an"Thouh he1 ea'es hi,(
p sd vre i nl, _._i :', ane-f
A walluedi afli.sngtnteniu
rac, anLth, lo1('-it(~ uttn i i'
';ity'schif as'AsInd Alin; i.
an enfo rter fatitn ad
ltoghel:dre swl a hs Ie
ci a u smltown.A krc't stay<Kr1
t~ is) hee tu tu toatedn
lin t n 01' the,it1y
"n AV n n n A3o lk Ld"i e
turs is ;iden.yadye l
go' como:t s may nillee
my h oymw nof , 1east."
M n the sou t,'' sadwa Wou.er.i
"many of tshos:r.adi-pi
in dew rc yrg~ oilite

' I
k ' -

r11 let .io 0 :1' M ihi
It ,ne bg unvers
"' lucef,i enroll° i
In~:. expns qef
ic t jisit , said

'. an o. I. ha heardl
if w t cn l en ln o
F~ ~l

5a ea r tan tt iterL ofr th
."_ id L DIenYinLhe io

F. W. GROSS'
123 E. Liberty St.

BU INE
ThE E AS 1iL- I._tBt)tU
IWA~iL{SFO~lA BM1N~S~ illc

Ok' UlIP Itul"I4dIAN 'I)AI
I' . ~ Wltil('~.' 1PUYI) REFER. TI!
P U' X1~ 12 >U P I'IRIIIS, INSI
I I. 'i, Lit', h' liii Ii> I LV (/IViES I
III 'ithMJ, 'litp l)IIIEVTOIIY Vi'.

who will show You our dress woolens.
and send Us your core et m reasure.

BOARI)1NIA 1104'SE
lIE S UAU1A~ T

S ~ ~ ~ ~ i' v,.t, S' _.P ND LNS 3 U
-i --.~ uu

I

rte r ,
: r-
f_ rv S
.e fvf
sw 71p
" ..e ./"..'
0 '

L argest t aiL nthe oworld
Pricy. Building

of GOOD 11d0. L Wr~c LwI4
Chicago., U. S. A.

'',/ i

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x.31 Soth Main. MC
Regular I1inner 2IIC
Lunches. .-enaeli
Chicken Dinner eey unay
Why not board atara ou'ii
Conme to 1M)5 X. PA. w'rsaynudbe
For small tableis and 1_0d .srice o
IPhone 1914-.

pfC' z~ 'lrin'k, th anepst8o
li?_° loopI
Phone s
I i s~~ m u-rnc
ElI " Lit lth, eeidiast,:ndAno.no

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