100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 10, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-11-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CAL AT YOUR
DOOR $2.50

V

The.

1 , Egan

Daly

I( TAILED T
ADDRESS

O ANY
$3.00

-0"

Jl

Vol. XXIII, No. 35. ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 10, 1912. PRICE FI"

MICHIGAN'S LEAD OF 21 POINTS GOES FOR
NAUGHT WHEN QUAKERS START TRIUMPHAL
MARCH IN DIRECTION OF WOLVERINE GOAL

THE WEATHER MAN
Forecast for Ann . arbor-Sunday,
warmer and cloudy.
FRET) ILAWTON WILL SPEAK
AT UNION THIS AFTERNOON
Fred Lawton, '11, of Detroit, will be
the principal feature on the program
at the Michigan Union this afternoon
at 3:00 o'clock. Since graduation,
Lawton has been a probation officer in
Detroit. A piano solo by Waldo Fel-
lows, '14, and a violin solo by H. C.
Rummel, '14, will complete the pro-
gram. The usual refreshments will
be served.

YESTERDAY'S RESULTS.
West. *
Chicago 3, Northwestern 0.*
Wisconsin 64, Arkansas 7. *
. S. U, 23, Oberlin 17.
Case 27, Kenyon 0. *
Illinois 9, Purdue 9. .
M. A. C. 61, Mt. Union 0. *
East. *
MichigaA 21, Pennsylvania 27. *
Carlisle 27, Army 6. *
Navy 7, Bucknell,17. *
Cornell 0, Dartmouth 24. *
Harvard 9, Vanderbilt 3.
Princeton 54, New York U, 0.
Yale 10, Brown 0. *
Syracuse 30, Lafayette 7. *
* * * * * * * -* * .

ASSAULT CA
MAY OCCA6

SALOD'

Quakers' Rejuvenation at Late Peri9d
in Game Results in 21-27
Defeat for Team
From West.

MEET THE TEAM TODAY.
Michigan's football team will arrive
in Ann Arbor on the 2:33 Michigan
Central train this afternoon.
Yes, Michigan lost. For the first
time in four years, the Wolverines
have peen forced to take the count
from the Red and Blue of Pennsylva-
nia.

LAK OF VERSATILITY IS i
BLAMED FOR MAIZE FAILURE
Marshall, Sub Quarter for Penn, Hero
of Contest Marked by
Many Thrills.
(Special to The Michigan Daily.)
PHILADELPHIA, PA., Nov. 9.-In
an uphill battle far surpassing that'of
Michigan against Pennsylvania last
year, the Quakers today overcame
enormous odds and defeated Michigan
27 to 21. The end really came with a
suddenness that surprised even, the
Penn rooters, that dumbfounded the
Michigan rooters, and that spilled de-
spair and gloom all over the Wolver-
ine camp. Pennsylvania came back,
-that tells the whole story. Appar-
ently beaten, and seemingly over-
whelmed after the first quarter, the
Quaker offense assumed steam roller
proportions, its line took on a stone-
wall aspect, and the wonderful scor-
ing machine of Michigan which had
run free in the first few minutes was
lost, disorganized, and disrupted.
The game was really lost when Mar-
shall. 'the little sub-quarter for the
easter-ners, plucked a punt out of the
air and dashed through the entire
Michigan team, twisting, dodging,
squirming without interference for a
touchdown in the last minute of play.
The thousands of Penn rooters, who
up to now had seen nothing but defeat
went suddenly crazy, and poured onto
the field in a wild endeavor to reach
this new gridiron hero who has sprungl
into the limelight at Michigan's ex-

Michigan should not have lost. Per-
haps. On the other hand, the Quaker
student body will insist that its team
should have won, as it did. Every ques-
tion has its two sides.
If the last quarter had been three
minutes shorter, if Marshall had been
stopped in his dash through
for the final touchdown, if
Penn's backs had been less
insistent-if, if, if-well if Michigan
had WON, the. student body would be
down in full force to meet the team to-
day. '
Many of the student body will .meet
the team on its return today. The real
test of Michigan spirit comes in times
of adversity, not of triumph. The true
Michigan mai forgets his own disap-
pointment in helping those to forget
who have a deeper grief.
It is certain that the slopes about
the depot will be crowded this after-
noon with Michigan men. We hope
that to the hearts of every one of these
men came that desire to be present, at
the very close of the heart-breaking
reports from Philadelphia yesterday.
Such men are the best definition of the,
intangible something we know as}
Michigan spirit.M

plays, the coaching of Yost, the excel-
lent condition of the men, are all use-
less unless there is less. mechanical
playing and more active scrimmage,
more practical football among the
men. The team is like a grand ma-
chine running smoothly when the op-
position is weak, but devoid of power
and confused when unexpected
strength upsets a few calculations.
Craig Stars as Usual.
"Jimmy" Craig was the particular
star of the Michigan team. The little
sprinter was Michigan's greatest
ground gainer, and his runs brought
even the hostile crowd to its feet.
And not only on offense was Craig the
star, but on defense he was easily the
most valuable man on the team. It
was "Jimmy's" tackles that stopped
Mercer and Minds time and again, and
it was he, who in the opinion of many
kept the score from being larger.
Thomson played a good game, while
Pontius and Quinn were the strong
points in the line. Hughitt played a
fine game and his defensive tackles
were powerful factors in stopping the
Quakers.
Mercer, Minds, and Marshall, assist-
ed now and then by Jourdet, were
Penn's best bets, but of course Mar-
shall is the hero tonight. The work
of the little sub-quarter was really re-

REGISTRATION

POsuting Attorney and Facnutj
TYAW to tAttauk Buo ta
FtqUented by
Studeata
THAyJELING SALNSTAN FINK
FOR TAKINf PART IN S(
President Hutchins Holds' Confe
lVith Prosecutor Burke on
the Subject.

FIGURES SHOW
FRSLARGEGROWTH'
Number of Students in Attendance at
University Is Larger by
168 Than Total
Last Year.
DEPARTMENTS OF DENTISTRY
AND HOMEOPATHY ADVANCING
Summer Session of 1912 Establishes
New Record and Brings Up
General Totals.:
Enrollment statistics which were

TOO VIGOROUS
Although Yearlings Put Up Stiff Game,
Hard Luck and Stubborn
Resistance Prevent
Victory.
TACKLING OF VISITORS IS
REVELATION TQ FRESHMEN.
Relative Strength of Two Teams is
Shown by Final Result;
Score 23.15.
The freshmen went up against a.

As a direct result' of the inquiry
to the Minckley assault case, a num
of local saloonkeepers may be charj
with violating the law prohibiting
sale of intoxicating liquors to any p
son who is a student. The names
these are now in the hands of Pro
cuting Attorney George Burke.
Prosecutor Burke was in conferer
with President H. B. Hutchins yest
day afternoon for about an hour a
a half, and it is understood that, as
result of the interview, .he has be
guaranteed the full support of I
university authorities in the matter
the prosecution. The faculty has fr<
ly offered to co-operate with the c
in the attempt to put an end to t
source of such occurrences as that
the Minckley assault, and prevent thi
repetition. . The list of names was fu
nished the prosecutor by the facuI
colnmittee before which Marshall
Foote, one of the suspended studenl
appeared, .and it is said to be a cor
plete list of places which the par
of students involved in the assault vi
ited on the night of the affair.
Lawrence Nagle, the Erie traveli
man arrested in connection with t:
assault, appeared in Justice Doty
court yesterday afternoon and plec
guilty. He was fined $20 and- eds
amounting to $5.50, which he paid.
is understood that the matter has bei
dropped as far as Nagle and the st
dents are concerned, and - Arthi
Brown, Minckley's counsel, will co-o
erate with the prosecutor in preparin
the case against the saloonkeepers.
HOLD FIRST DEBATING TRYOU'T

made public by Secretary Shirley W. band of Tartars yesterday when Adri-

Penn Deserves Credit. -
Too much credit cannot be given
to the Quakers for the wonderful bat-
tle they put up, the team apparently
never doubting, even in the face of
three Michigan touchdowns, that it
would win. Swept off their feet in the
First quarter, unable to gain, unable to
stop the powerful Wolverines, they
came back, and reversing conditions,
won out in the last minute. It was a
wonderful exhibition of staying power
and nerve, and the Pennsylvania stu-
dents tonight are holding wild celebra-
tions over the victory. ,
As to what happened to Michigan,
that is what football experts are ask-
Pig themselves tonight. Starting with
a rush that could not be brooked, the
Woyerines gave every appearance of a
poijt-m inute team, scoring 14 tallies
in 13 minutes, and making three touch-
downs in the first h lf. Then they
stopped. The effort seemed still there
but something was lacking,- the of-
fense lost its power, the defense seem-
pd bewildered.
The long consistent gains that were
present at the start seemed to have
faded away, and Mercer and Minds
made big gains where they failed be-
fore. The team did not go to pieces,
yet it did not run smoothly,-it wA-s
more or less eleven men who depend-=
ed wore on each other than upon their+
own efforts.
Yost Not to be Blamed.
Clearly not an iota of blame for the1
defeat can be placed upon the shoul-
ders of Yost. It was at the start a
wonderful team, powerful in offense,
impregnable on defense. The coach-
ing was there, the plays were there,-
a wonderful repertoire,-and thet

"!
1
.t

blocking and tackling were good. It
was a beautifully trained machine,
playing as it should.
And then suddenly it appeared as if
the men had forgotten some things.
The plays did not run smoothly, the
defense lost its punch. Perhaps it
can be summed up by saying that
Michigan was nIot versatile. It easily
solved Penn's straight plays, but when
the Quakers started strange forma-
tions and opened up forward passes,
the defense seemed helpless because
they were new. When Penn solved
Michiggn's plays and made the gafhs
more difficult, the Wolverines lost their
offensive power. It was not lack of
coaching, it did not seem to be a lack
of training, but it was lack of versa-
tility.

_;
i
i
i
{C
E
{
I

markable, and his work seemed Ito
strengthen the Quaker offense and put
fight into the easterners. Mercer's
work, both in running and bucking,
was of the variety that he showed last
year, while Minds and Jourdet were
the forward toss experts who did good
work.'
The game may be, costly to Michigan
in that Paterson, the big center of the
Wolverines, was hurt and may not be
able to get into the Cornell game.
"Bubbles" played an excellent game
until he was forced to retire, and he
did so then only under protest, hav-
ing been injured earlier in the game
but insisting on staying in. His bum
ankle was badly wrenched, and al:
though the extent of the injury is not
definitely known tonight, it is certain
he will not be able to play for several
days. Huebel, who was also hurt, was
not seriously injured and will be in

L.iterary dept 2,282
Dentistry........252
Graduate.........206
Law ............ 654
Medicine.........221
Homeop..........77
Pharmacy.........92
Engineering .....1,284
Deduct for double
registration ... 145
Total ..........4,923

793
242
101
82
1,292
161
4,930

Filial,1911-'12
2,349
232

Smith yesterday show an increase of
168 as against the enrollment on Nov.
1st last year.
The figures are as follows-

an arrayed her warriors across Ferry
field, and honorable defeat was their
lot at the hands of the neighboring
collegians. Outweighed and outgen-
eraled, especially in the latter part of.
the game, the 23 to 15 score, with the
youngsters on the little end, is indica-
tive of the strength of the two teams.
The first-year men fought a hard
battle from the first whistle to the
last and Adrian earned every point it
succeeded in nailing. Hunt, who start-
ed at quarter for the locals, ran the
team in great shape until a-dislocated
jaw ousted him froni his position; but
Catlet who followed him, although
playing a great defensive game, fail-
ed to exercise good generalship in
sending his backfield into action and
its progress was slow from that time
on.

Summer session, 1912, ..........1,324
Deduct for double registration . . 627
Summer session #911,.........1,194
Deduct for double registration.. 542

No 'Glaring Defects Present.
There is no strong criticism of the
Wolverines here tonight, but those

shape again shortly. Grand totals of registration:
Wolverines Win Toss. Nov.re1,d1912 . ...................5,620
Michigan won the toss and received Nov. 1, 1911,..................,452
the kick-off, Pennsy trying to work Nov. 1, 1910, ... ..............5,339
the old short kick; but it failed and Nov. 1, 1909,.............5,258
Michigan took the ball on its own
40-yard line. Line plays failing, an ns
exchange of punts followed, Michigan and on the next play shot over forea

who saw the game attribute the out-
come more to Penn's sudden upheaval.
Clearly there were some faults in
Michigan's playing, but they were not;
of the glaring kind,-there was no
one fault responsible for the defeat.
The men individually played excellent
games, and no one weak spot can be
picked out, unless perchance it is the
Wolverine weakness its breaking up
forward passes, for Penn made most
of its gains this way. Yost after the
game had no statement to give out, ex-
cept that Michigan lost 2(O chances or
more to wiry. The old fault of Michi-
gan's tackling wa.s present, and it
showed up when Marshall made his
brilliant run, but it semed generally
distributed..
The game proved clearly one thing,
and that i§ that if Michigan expects
to finish the rather dis .st oils seasonl
with a victory over Cornell, the in-
dividual players must become more
versatile, more able to diagnose
strange formations quickly and to in-
vent some method of stopping them on
the spur of the moment,. The string of

finally getting the ball on Pennsy's 35-
yard-line because of interfer-
ence with a fair catch. Thom-
son made 12 yards off tack-
lQ and followed it upbwith a
20-yard gain. Three line bucks net-!
ted but little, but on the fourth tryj
Hughitt went through the line for theE
first touchdown. Paterson goaled.
Penn kicked off again and an ex-
change of punts followed, Michigan
getting the ball in the middle of the
field. Huebel gained 10 yards around
end, and then in two plays Craig car-
ried 30 yards. Thomson made eight,

touchdown, the two tallies coming in
13 minutes of play. Paterson again
goaled. With only two more minutes
in the quarter, a punting duel follow-
ed with results about equal.
At the start of the second quarter,
Pennsy started opening up forward
passes and gained considerable
ground, forcing the play far into the
Wolverine territory. Michigan held,
however, and with line bucks by
Thomson and Craig carried the hall
to Pennsylvania's 45-yard line. Hue-
bel made 20 and then short bucks tool
(Continued on page Q.)

Open work was responsible for prac-
tically every material gain for the
youngsters, although the line plunges
of Diehl and Meade were nothing short
of marvelous. Three times in the first
qiuarter the freshmen ran thV ball
down to Adran's 10-yard line but at
the critical moment the beefy line
held, and the ball went over on
downs. During this period the ball
was inside Adrian's 20-yard line for
fully 10 minutes, as it was unable to
punt over 10 yards against the wind
when it had the ball, and one punt was
carried over the head of the kicker
and resulted in a, safety,
Race 30 Yards to Goal.
The two touchdowns credited to the,
freshmen .were well-earned, the first
one coming in the second quarter
when James received a pass from
Meade, and raced 30 yards to the visit-'
or'4 goal; and the last quarter saw the
second points go up when Catlet was
sent over the line after the ball was
brought down within striking distance
by the consistent line plunges of Diehl,
Meade and Rhoem.
The visitors were in the game hard,
and their tackling was a revelation
to the yearlings. Pierce and Wayres
were valuable men on the line, and
Sala and Nichols were the speed mer-
chants of the backfield. Cochran was
the keystone of the freshman line, and
Continued on page 6.)

Societies Choose Teams to Repres
Them in Annual Contests.
The literary societies held tryo
last nigh't to pick members of
teams which will debate against e,
other to decide the campus champi
ship and to pick the men for the I
Varsity debating teams.
The men picked by the various so
eties are as follows: Alpha Nu-L.
Dunten, '14, E. W. McFarlane, '13,
W, Moore, '15, and E. W. Bailey, alt
nate; Adelphi-Paul W. Blancha
'14, W. W. Schoeder, '14, H. Parks,
and E. Rosenberg, '13, alternate; J
fersonian-D. S. Hulbert, '14L, B.
Jonkman, '13L, W. T. Bie, '13L, a
Donald Melhorn '14L, alternate.
The Webster. society will meet
Adelphi on Nov. 25 and the Jefferso
ans will debate with Alpha Nu sodi
on November 27. Six men will be pi(
ed from the winning teams in thf
debates, three of whom will deb
against Chicago, and three agai:
Northwestern in the annual contest
Senior Lits Will Hold First Dinne
Senior lits will hold the first of a
ries of four dinners at the Union W
nesday evening at 5:30. Mr. Re
Talamon, of the French departme
will speak on "College Life in Pari
An orchestra composed of memb
of the class will furnish the mus
Tickets for the series may be obtain
from any member of the social cc
mittee for $2.00.

tro
Miinister

eslwtertan Church
REV. LENOARD A. BARRETT
Student Pastor REV. J. LESLIE FRENCH
Sermon by Mr. Barrett 'Why does not Spiritual Life
seem more real. '
University Classes.
A Live Young Peoples Meetinug

ip:3o A. M.
12:0 P. M.
6:30 P. 9-.

Union

THEODORE

C.

SOAR ES

Prosby tori an

Series

Church

University of Chicago

"6A

Religion,

Human

and

Dvinie"

.Cav. Hurn

mm-

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan