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May 12, 1914 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-05-12

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Val. XXI=p No. 157. ANN ARBOR MICHIGAN TUESDAY, MAY 1.2, 1914. PRICED FIVE CENTS

TOSSERS IDLE
WHILE DELUGE
ERWNS FIELD
Rain Blocks Drill on Varsity Grounds;
Cornll's Showing Against
Princeteon Proves
Her Strength
BARIBEAU MAY TWIRL IN
GAME AAINST IT IACANS
All Pitchers Are In Shape; Lundgren
Satisfied With Saturday's
ShowIng
Balked yesterday by rain which kept
his men from practice, and which
promised n drill for today, Coach
Lundgren last night presented a good
imitation of pessimism when doping
out the Wolverine prospects for the
Cornell diamond clash, scheduled for
tomorr Q on Ferry field.
Aoording to the Michigan tutor, the
lthacans will furnish the stiffest kind
of oppition. Lndgren believes that
pthe Big I.. bunch Is just abouttas
strong as anything in the east, and
cites their victory over Princeton, by a
count of 6 to 2, to substantiate his be-
11ef In Regan, the Cornell twirler,
the Wolverine batters will be called
upon to face a mioundsman who has
been. having things all his own way,
and who has engendered a wholesome
respect in the minds tf eastern dia-
mond squads. This heaver will prob-
ably be the Cornell 'hoiee for the
heavy work against Michigan tomor-
row, and the prospect is not a bright
one for Lundgren's idle batters.
Thbe coach hs not yet decided on
his pitcher for Wednesday's game.
With the possible exception of Captain
Sis , somewhat worn out by his
strenm1 s atvties of Saturday, all
the W olverine twirlersare In good
shape and ready for the ry. It is lg
ically Bari ea ' turn for duty, and the
veteran may be the finl choice.
Lndre ~yesterday expressed him-
self as not entirely disgusted with the
showing o imen I thegame on
it rda. lth the exception of the
oneaudi'nig when the Orangemen
shove ad rn gtheir two runs, the
coach avers that the Wolverines played
better than good bal an'cordng ta
Is *lews, No re Dame and (Georgia
lookeds uch more dangerous to Mich-
igan than diSyrause on Saturday.
OPPICERBS OF DRAMA LEAGUE
FCCOEN AT ANNUAL MEETING
Miss ang1ey Elected President; Club
May Present Play on Open
Air Arena
Members of the Ann Arbor center of
the trama League of America held
their second annual meeting in Bar-'
hour gymnasium yesterday afternoon,
at which the following officers were
elected: president, Miss Annie W.
Langley vice-presidents, Mrs a. H.
Murfin, Prof. T. C. Trueblood and Mrs.
Dan Zimmerman; secretary, Mrs. A.
M. Barrett; treasurer, Harry Hawley;
directors, Wilfred B. Shaw, Mrs. W. P.
Lombad Prof. L. A. Strauss, Mr. H. A.
Abbott,rDr. A. L. Clark and Mrs. A. L.
Ladd,
The report ofthemembership com-
mttee showed a net gain of 74 mem-
tbers over last year, bringing the total
enrollment up to 266. Of these mem-
bers 52 are students in the university.
Final arrangements were made for
.Mrs. Fiske, who will appear here May

18 under the auspices of the League.
If it is finally decided to give an open
air play on Dr. Lombard's lawn, an-
nouncement will be made later.
STUDENT COUNCIL TO ELECT
NEXT SEMESTEWS OFFICERS
The student council will meet for the
last timne this semester at 7 :00 o'clock,
Thursda~y night. Officers, for the. fol-
lowing semester will be elected, the re-
vised constitution will be officially'
adopted, final preparations for the
spring games on Friday and Saturday
will be made, and provision for the
election of four new councilmen in!
two weeks will be made:.

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Annual senior swing-out march to Uni-
Versity Hall starts at 3:05 o'clock.
Swing-out program, University Hall
3:30 o'clock.
Fihals in Fresh and Soph relay ob-
stacle race try-outs, Fair grounds,
4:00 to 6:00 o'clock.
Weighing-in for Soph tug-of-war
teams, Waterman gym, 4:00 to 6:00
o'clock.
Prof. R. E. Hoxey speaks in Engineer-
ing lecture room, 1:30 o'clock.
*EVENTS OF TOMORROW
All-fresh "pep" mass meeting for
spring contests, W. physics lecture
room, 7:00 o'clock.
Cornell-Michigan baseball game, Ferry
field, 4:05 o'clock.
First May Festival concert, Alma
Gluck, soprano, Hill auditorium, 8:00
o'clock.
Junior engineer cabaret dinner, Mich-
igan Union, 6:00 o'clock.
NEW ATTRACTIONS
FEATURE EXHIBIT
Complete Electric Semaphore System
Has Been Installed on
Railroad
GIVE FREE WIRELESS SERVICE
Several new features have been added
to the list of attractions planned for
the engineering exhibit Thursday and
Friday. Mr. John Airey, instructor in
engineering mechancs, has construct-
ed a five-foot model of the earth, show-
ing the location of the continents. A
magnet has been installed in the
sphere, and gyroscopes will be placed
at different locations on the surface.
In this way the effect of magnetic at-
traction on gyroscopic action will be
demonstrated.
A complete electric semaphore sys-
tem has been installed on the minia-
ture railroad constructed by the elec-
trical engineers. An electric engine
will run continuously during the ex-
hibit, drawing a trailer which will hold
four passengers. The engineers will
generate their own power for the min-
iature train.
The wireless service will send mes-
sages free of charge durng the exhi-
bition to the following cities: Detroit,
Toledo, Cleveland, Columbus, Kane,
Pa.; Knoxville, Tenn.; Gand Rapids,
St. Clair, Saginaw, Flint, Ypsilanti,
Bay City, Wheeling, W. Va.; Waynes-
field, 0.; Ashtabula, 0.; Erie, Pa.; Buf-
falo, Chicago, Memphis, St. Louis,
Pittsburg.
TENNIS TEAM TO LEAVE.FOR
HATCH IN TOLEDO 1TOMORROW
Captain E. C. Wilson of the Varsity
tennis team will probably take the
same men who played the Detroit Ten-
nis club Saturday, to Toledo tomorrow
for the match with the club of that city.
'he Varsity four, which will leave Fri-
day to play the schedule of seven
matches in the east, will be chosen
from the following candidates, besides
Captain Wilson: Allen Andrews, '14L,
Ira Reindel, '15E, R. C. Hall, '14E, Will
Shafroth, '14, and John Switzer, '16.
SALE OF MICHIGANENSIAN
POSTPONED BY MANAGEMENT
According to the statement of man-

aging editor R. B. Sturtevant, '14, the
1914 Michiganensian will not be plac-
ed on sale until Saturday or Monday.
The annual was scheduled to appear
today but delay in securing cuts has
necessitated a postponement of the
date of issue. Printing has been com-
pleted and the process of binding is
now well under headway.
HE AD OF JAPAN'S RAILWAYS
PAYS VISIT TO ANN ARBOR
Yoshio Wataube, chief engineer of
the imperial government railway sys-
tem of Japan, visited the engineering
department yesterday, Mr. Wataube is
en route to Japan, having spent some
time in the east studying the railway
systems of the United States.

FIRST IMPRESSIONS!

i( 111

JOHN LEONARD IS,
VARSITY MANAGER
Directorate of Athletic Association
Fills Vacant Football Post
by Election

CHICAGO OCHIESTRA.
NUMBERS 70 MEN
Frederick Stock's Musicians to Play
at Every Concert of May
Festival

SPECIAL SESSION ON WEIDNESOAY I PROGRAM COVERS WIDE RANGE

JIohn'Leonard, '16L, wa;s electeti Yar-
sity football manager yesterday after-
noon at the meetin of the board of
directors of the athletic association.
He will take the place left: vacant by
the resignation of Hlarold Schradzki,
'151.
. The election of Leonard was by a
unanimous vote of the directorate and
came after a careful canvass had been
made of the available 6andidates. John
Naylon, Douglas Donald and John
Leonard were the three men nominated
for consideration by the bonird, Leon-
ard winning out on the first ballot.
The newly-elected manager has
been prominent in campus activities
during his three years in the universi-
ty. Members of the board stated last
night that the choice of a manager was
based chiefly on ability to handle the
executive duties of the office. Leonard
will manage the team which will play
the heaviest schedule in the history of
a Michigan football team, including, as
it does, the battle with Harvard at
Cambridge.
A special meeting of the directorate
is to be held tomorrow, at which time
the questions not taken up yesterday
will be placed before the board. It
is probable that the matter of elections
to the board in control will be discuss-
ed at this time.
DANCING CHORUSES RECEIVE
LARGE PART OF ATTENTION
Professor Kenyon Looks for Complete
Rehearsal of Pageant by
Next Week
Dances are receiving the greatest at-
tention at present in the drilling of the
pageant choruses. Work has beca
steadily pushed forward, and Professor
Kenyon expects to rehearse the entire
pageant the first of next week.
The court dances have been prac-
ticed to a nicety, while the peasant
dances need a day or two more to per-
fect them. Half a hundred more men
are needed to balance the pageant cast.
Mr. E. V. Moore, instructor in the
school of music, has written one of the
songs for the pageant. It is called
"The Fairy Tree of Bourlemont," and
is intended for the children's song.
Training the main cast has not been
started in earnest as yet, because their
work must wait for thG finishing
touches on the large chorus.,

When the Chicago Symphony obches-
tra appears in Hill auditorium tomor-
row evening, as the opening attraction
of the 21st annual May festival, it will
number 70 men. This is the largest
orchestra that has ever played at a
May festival in Ann Arbor. As usual,
Mr. Stock's men will furnish a back-
ground for the event, appearing in ev-
ery concert except the organ recital
Saturday afternoon.
The orchestral works will cover.
a wide range, and an attempt has been
made to satisfy the varied tastes of
festival patrons. Among these works,
the D Minor Symphony (Cesar Franck),
"Till Eulenspiegel" (Strauss),- "Im-
pressios of Italy" (Charpentier), "Fire
Music" (Wagner) and selections from
"Midsummer Night's Dream" (Men-
delssohn), stand out in bold relief;
while the magnificent "Festival March
and Hymn to Liberty," by Frederick
Stock, will be welcomed, first on ac-
count of the esteem in which the com-
poser is held and, after hearing it, on
account of its exalted worth.
SOPHS MAY LOSE OBSTACLE
RACES THROUGH DEFAULTS
Small Number of 1916 Men Try Out for
Teams; Freshmen Report in
Full Force
Final trials for the fresh-soph relay
obstacle teams, will be held from 1:00
to 3:30 o'clock this afternoon at the
Fair grounds. Unless second year men
turn out in larger numbers, the fresh-
men will win the races by default, as
only ten sophs have attempted to run
for time to date.
Freshmen weighed in for the tug-of-
war teams in goodly numbers yester-
day afternoon, with the result that the
necessary quota of 135 men is nearly
completed. But, as in the relay teams,
there are still many places to fill, and
freshmen who have not been on the
scales, may be weighed in this after-
noon from 4:00 to 6:00 o'clock, with
the sophomores.
Plans for the push ball combat have
been completed. Final instructions
will be given out at the mass meetings
scheduled for freshmen tomorrow, and
for Thursday night for sophomores.,
Barriers will be erected on Ferry field
Friday morning, to enable relay team
members to practice getting over the
obstacles.,

* "SWING-OUT" PROGRAM FOR
* T*E DAY.
* 3:05 o'clock, seniors of all de- *
* partments meet for march to *
* University Hall. *
* Lits, between U. hall and mu- *
* seum.*
* Engineers, between U. hall and *
* Dr. Angell's residence. *
* Medics, between U. hall and i- *
* brary. *
* Laws, between U. hall and flag *
* pole.*
* Pharmies, near the cannon. *
* Homeops, at north entrance of *
* economics building. *
* Dents, at south entrance of *'
* economics building. *
* 3:30 o'clock,exercises in U. Hall. *
* 4:15 o'clock, promenade around *
* the campus. *
* 6:00 o'clock, Cap and Gown din- *
* ner at the Union. *
* 7:00 o'clock, first all-senior sing, *'
* Memorial hall. *'
* 8:30 o'clock, Cap and Gown *
* dance at the Union. *
* s4 * 4* ' * "4' 4' + *
OFFICERS ELECTED
BY MUSICAL CLUBS
Positions Go to Go d, Curry, Shafer,
Mills and Westerman at
Banquet'
TO DISTRIBUTE TRIP MEMENTO
At the annual banquet of the Mu-
sical clubs, held last night at the Un-
ion, the following officers were elect-
ed: presidnt, J. K. Gould, '14; vice-
president, G. J. Curry, '15M; business
manager, Wilson Shafer, '16; leader of
the mandolin club, Russell Mills, '14E;
and leader of the Glee club, Kenneth
Westerman, '14.
letirhig manager H 13. Carpenter,
'14, announced that a memento of the'
recent trip would be printed in the
form of a 16 page booklet, replete with
cuts, giving a short history of the past"
season. Each member of the clubs
will be presented with one of these=
souvenirs.
Final arrangements are being com-
pleted for the entertainment of the vis-
iting Californians, who will be the
guests of the local organization at a
joint concert on May 23. In the morn-
ing they will be given an auto .ride
throughout the city. In the afternoon'
they will be guests of. the Michigan
musicians at the inter-scholastics, and'
after the concert in the evening they
will be tendered a dance at the Union.
John Bruce, '16L, has been put in
charge of the dance arrangements. He
will be assisted by a committee of
girls, who will secure partners for the
visiting collegians.
TEN SOPH LITS PASS OVER
BURNINGSANDS OF SAHARA
Despite adverse weather
conditions, the sands o f t h e
Sahara burned beneath the feet
of 10 sophomores last night, when they
entered Sphipx, junior literary honor-
ary society: R. S. Collins, R.L.Thorsch,
George McMahon, George Murphy, H.
L. Smith, C. E. Ufer, Walter Nye, Earl
McKinley, Frank Quail, and George
Fox. After the initiation, the banquet
was held at the Union.
FACULTY MEN TO ADDRESS
MEETING OF SOUTHERNERS
Dixie club, an organization of south-
ern students, will -hold a smoker and
business meeting Thursday night, at

8:00 o'clgck, at the Union. Several fac-
ulty speakers will be present to ad-
dress the club. Officers for the coming
school year will be elected and the con-
stitution of the National Association
of Dixie clubs will be presented for
approval. If accepted, the president
of the national association will be
elected from among the members of
the local chapter.
Rain Prevents Interclass Ball Games
Rain prevented starting the second
round of the interclass baseball series,
scheduled for yesterday. Today's
schedule is as follows: fresh medics
vs, soph lits and homeops vs. junior
laws.

SENIORS WILL
MARCH OUT IN
GOWNS TODAY.
Annual "Swing-Out" Exercises Will Be
Held; Festivities in Eveing
Will Close Day's
Program
RAINY WEATHER MAY CAUSE
POSTPO1NITG OF PROMENADE
All-Senior Sing Comes at 7:00 O'elock;
Dinner-Dance May Be
Indoors
Clad i their academic robes of som-
ber black for the first time, more than
1,000 seniors, from every department
in the university, will participate this
afternoon in the traditional "swing-
out" exercises.
At 3:05 o'clock, the weather permit-
ting, the seniors in their caps and
gowns, will meet with their respective
classes on the campus walk.
As the campus clock stries 'h
quarter hour, the members of the dif-
ferent departments in order nauod
will proceed to University Hall where=°
the usual exercises will be held. The
program will start promptly at 3:30
o'clock with the invocation offere by
Dr. M. L. D'Ooge, Professor-Emeritus
of Greek. President H. 13.. Hutchins
and President-Emeritus James-B. An-
gell will give short addresses. Fol-
lowing the benediction by Dr. 'Qoge
the seniors will leave the hal by the
main entrance, and proceed along 'the
main walk to State street. Here the
line of march will turn south to Memo-
riafhall, then to the engineering buiLd-
ing, through the arch to 'e fla:g poe,-
to the gymnasiums, and then on North
University to the law bnilding. Whe
parade will stop here and the seniors
of the different departments will' pose
for the annual group pictures.
The program for the rest of the day
will be taken up by the "Cap and qown
Party" at the Union and the first All-
Senior Sing at 7:00 o'clock on the steps
of Memorial hall. The musical clubs
will assist in leading the singing.
Leaflets telling of the plans of march
in detail, will be distributed this morn-
ing. Distinctive ribbons, to be pin-
ned on the gowns to distinguish the
different departments, will be given
out before the 'march begins. If the
weather is unfavorable, the promenade
will be postponed until the same time
tomorrow afternoon.
Rain will not prevent the All-Senior
dinner-dance at the Union, as arrange-
ments have been made to serve the
meal indoors if necessary. At present
about 125 tickets have been sold, and
a large sale is expected today. The
cards will be on sale all day among
social committeemen, and at the Union
desk, at $2.00 per couple. Tickets will'
also be sold at the door. Separate din-
ner coupons will be sold at $1.00 per
couple. Seniors will wear their gowns
at the dinner, and check them during
the dance.
Gordon C. Eldredge has been chosen
to hand out the diplomas during an in-
formal grand march during the eighth
dance. Dancing will continue until at
least 1:00 .o'clock, and later if neces-
sary.
t. E. MILLER INJURED IN
JUMPING FROM MOVING CAR
In attempting to alight from a mov-
ing D. U. R. car Sunday evening at

Packard and State streets,.H. E. Miller,
'16E, fell and sustained slight injuries
about the arms and knee's. Miller had
boarded the car down-town, intending
to ride only as far as State street.
When the car failed to stop, he at-
tempted to jump off, and fell in doing
so. Physicians at the University
health service treated Miller and pro-
nounced his injuries as only slight.
W. G. Stroh of Pittsburg Gives Talk
Mr. W. G. Stroh, vice-president of
the Stroh Self-Hardening Process
Company of Pittsburg, Pa., will speak
before the class in chemical engineer-
ing ., at. 9:00 o'clock this morning.
His topic will be "Some Phases in the
Manufactureiof Large Gears." The
public is invited.

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