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May 06, 1914 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-05-06

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ie

Michigan

Daily

..:..

Vol. XXIV, No.-152.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, MAY 6, 1914.

PRIG FIVB

PRICE FIVE

...

SHIFTED TEAM

BESTS LAVANS
SQUAD 9 TO 2
Varsity Men Swap Positions, Use Sub-
stitutes and Still Romp
Away With Easy
Victory
COACH AND CAPTAIN ABSENT;
BAKER DIRECTS ACTIVITIES
McNamara and Payette Do Slab Duty
For Youngsters But Fail to
Fool Batters
Sans coach, sans captain, with two
substitutes in the lineup, and right
fielder Benton appearing behind the
bat for the first time since
the squad was indoors, the Varsity had
no trouble in defeating the All-Fresh
team 9 to 2 yesterday afternoon, in a
contest which went six rounds.
Short stop Baker was in charge of
the nine, and sent Waltz in at Hugh-
itt's corn, and Shivel into Labadie's
berth in left field. Hippler, of the
catching staff, traded places with Ben-
ton, and all of the men acquitted them-
selves without misplays.-
A hit by Benton, and errors by Gray
and Thomas gave the Varsity a two
run lead in the first inning. In the
fourth, however, the regulars began
to find McNamara, and hits by Hippler,
Howard and McQueen, a hit batter and
two passed balls, gave the Varsity four
runs.
Shivel's double in the fifth, following
Hippler's walk, netted a run at the ex-
pense of Payette; and in the sixth
Sheehy and. Howard scored when
Kraus dropped the third strike on Ben-.
ton, and threw to first.
The freshmen collected two runs off+
Davidson in the third round. McNa-
mara walked, and Brandel hit him
home. Nieman's single scored Bran-
del. Ferguson, who threw the lasti
three innings for the Varsity, held the+
freshmen safe without a run.
The Varsity lined up and batted as
follows: Sheehy cf; Howard 1b; Mc-I
Queen2b; Benton c; Baker ss; Waltz:
3b; Hippler rf; Shivel If; Davidson p;
and Ferguson p.
All fresh: Thomas 3b; Brandel lf;I
Nieman cf; Maltby lb; Kraus c; Gray!
ss; Patterson rf; Barterlo 2b; McNa-
mara p; and Payette p.
CAP AND GOWN COMPANIES
MAKE DELIVERIES THIS WEEK
Caps and gowns were received by
Henry & Co. yesterday, and are ready
for distribution today to those who
have ordered them. Mack & Co., andI
Kyer will be ready to make deliveriesA
either tomorrow or Friday. Orders1
will be received by all the contracting
firms until Saturday night. A deposit
of $5.00 is required when the gowns
are delivered, of which $3.00 will be
refunded when the outfits are return-
ed. Reports indicate that nearly every
senior will be in the swing-out paradew
next Tuesday.E
SEVEN SENIORS ARE PLACED
BY APPOINTMENT COMMITTEEI

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Tau Beta Pi dinner, Michigan Union,
6:00 o'clock.
Round-Up club smoker, Michigan Un-
ion, 8:30 o'clock.
Student's recital, School of Music hall,
4:15 o'clock.
Graduation recital by Miss Katherine
Darby, pianist, School of Music hall,
8:00 o'clock.
Try-outs for Soph relay obstacle race,
fair grounds, 3:00 o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW
Varsity band concert, Hill auditorium,
8:00 o'clock.
President Harry B.. Hutchins speaks at
Harris hall, 6:30 o'clock.
Prof: John Allen speaks at Graduate
club dinner dance, Michigan Union,
6:15 o'clock.
Graduating exercises for nurses, Sar-
ah Caswell Angell hall, 8:00 o'clock.
Soph engineer class dance, Michigan
Union, 8:00 o'clock.
Michigan-Syracuse baseball game, Fer-
ry field, 4:05 o'clock.
George S. Shelton gives public address
in University hall, 4:15 o'clock.
Canadian club smoker, Barrister's
rooms, 8:00 o'clock.
PLACE NO LIMITS
ON ENTRY ROSTER
Farrell to Allow All Eligible Track
Mein to Compete in Varsity
Meet

CHOOSE 15 JUNIORS

FRESHMEN SHOW
LITTLE CLASS PEP

FOR LAW REVIEW!

-

- -- -
Board Picks Men for Staff From
Elected by Whole
Class

List I Only

12 Men at Fair Grounds Yester-
day for Tryouts in Annual
Obstacle Races

ALMA GLUCK TO OPEN FESTIVAL
Won Great Favor Last Year; Initial
Concert Mlay 13
Alma Gluck found a warm place in
the hearts of Festival patrons when
she appeared at the May festival in
University Hall two years ago. En-
dowed with charm, radiant health and
a wonderfully beautiful voice, this

COUNCIL PLANS
J .YOF 6MEMBER
Special Meeting Passes Resolution]
Delegation of. Judicial
Powers to Small
Body
PICK FROM LIST NAMED BY
PRESIDENTS OF UPPER CLASS

WILL HOLD ANOTHER ELECTION
Fifteen junior laws were elected to
the board of editorial assistants of the
Michigan Law Review for "the coming
year, at a meeting of the Board of Con-
trol of the Review yesterday afternoon.
.he elections were based upon scholas-
tic standings, from a list elected by the
class as a whole.
Those elected were-W. F. Black, H.
C. Bogle, M. K. Brown, L. M. Hall, V.
H. Hampton, F. J. Kennedy, W. I. Mc-
Kenzie, S. W. Marx, R. B. O'Harra, A.
M. Reed, W. R. Roberts, Saverio Ro-
sato, C. G. Schoeffel, E. R. Thurston
and J. G. Tucker.
A second election will be held just
after the June examinations. The num-
ber to be elected at that time will de-
pend upon whether or not all the can-
didates who are elected at the meeting
yesterday accept. However, at least
six additional men will be placed on
the staff.
NEW APPARATUS WILL MAKE
AUTO LAB BEST IN COUNTRY
A $2,000 dynamometer is being test-
ed by the Diehl manufacturing com-
pany, and on completion will be sent
to the automobile laboratory. The ad-
dition of this equipment will make the
Michigan laboratory superior to any
college automobile laboratory in the
country, and equal to the great testing
rooms of the leading automobile fac-

I TRIALS FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
First freshman tryouts held yester-
day afternoon at the. Fair grounds, for
the relay obstacle races, indicated that
the yearlings are lacking the necessa-
ry pep, in that only 12 aspirants sum-
moned up enough energy to run trial
heats. As 48 men will have to be se-
lected from each class to fill out the
three 16-man teams, the student coun-
cil urges the first and second year men
to turn out in larger numbers. Owing
to the non-arrival of the obstacles and
barrels, the soph tryouts scheduled for
this afternoon, have been postponed.
Instead both freshmen and sophomores
will be given final opportunities to
land places on the teams Friday after-
noon from 3:00 to 5:30 o'clock, and
Saturday morning from "9:00 to 12:00
o'clock.
In accordance with the plan of elect-
ing captains for the various contests,
as adopted last year, Waldo Fellows,
'14, Spencer Scott, '14P, and H. G.
Tait, '15, chairmen of the contest com-
mittees have apportioned the election
of .captains among the classes in the
following way:
Freshmen engineers will elect cap-
tains for the lightweight tug-of-war
team, the second relay and the push-
ball contest. Freshman lits will choose
the heavy-weight tug-of-war team, the
middleweight team and the first relay
team. The combined department fresh-
man homeop, dents and pharmics will
elect a leader for the third relay team.
Sophomore engineers will select the
heavyweight tug captain, and first and
second relay team leaders. Soph lits
will elect a middleweight tug-of-war
captain, and a leader for the first relay
team. Fresh laws will elect the push-
ball leader, and the combined depart-
ment sophs will choose the lightweight
tug-of-war captain.
The elections will be made by the va-
rious classes at meetings neld next
Monday afternoon, and will probably
meet Monday night at the Union to
make final plans for the contests.
PAGEANT CHORUS
HAS BEGUN WORK

American soprano has won for herself
an enviable position throughout the
musical world. Her appearance in
Hill auditorium, therefore, as soloist
with the Chicago Symphony orchestra
will be awaited eagerly. This concert,
which takes place Wednesday, May 13,
will open the 21st annual May festival.
Roth Will Attend Cornell Exercises
Prof. Filibert Roth will represent the
university at the dedicatory exercises
of th'e new forestry building at Cor-
nell May 13.
PLAY. TWO GAMES
IN CLASS LEAGUE.

Senior Engineers and Junior'
Win Easy Victories on
Ferry Field

Laws

Constitutional Provision Regarding
"Disorderly Conduct" Limited
by New Clause
With the adoption of a resolution
providing for the delegating of the
judicial powers of the student council
to a jury of 6, selected from 15 men
appointed by upperclass presldentsthe
council at a special meeting last night,
finished the work of revising the pres-
ent constitution. The radical change is
embodied in the following resolution.
"Resolved, That when a case arises,
the council will, if it so desires, re-
quest each upper class president in
the various departments, to appoint
one man from his class to serv( t the
jury. From this group of 15, th coun-
cil will select 6 which will constitute
the jury, before which offenders will
be tried."
The wording of the resolution does
not make it imperative that a jury be
chosen for each offense, for by the
phrase, "if it so desires," the council
can use its discretion in calling a spe-
cial jury, depending upon whether it
deems the offense important enough to
warrant such procedure.
The action of the'council in provid-
ing the special jury for important tri-
als, comes as a result of the long trials
in the riot charges, resulting from the
trouble after the Pennsy game last
fall. The many activities of the coun-
cilmen made it almost impossible for
the members of.the council to devote
sufficient time to the trials, and the
plan of delegating the jury duties to
a selected jury has been the result.
The other change made in the con-
stitution last night was the limiting
of the phrase "preventing disorderly
conduct," by which the police duties
of the council were defined in the old
constitution, by the following resolu-
tion:
"Resolved, That it is the duty of the
council to prevent hazing, rioting and
destruction of property. After warn-
ingt such offenders, it shall be the duty
of the council to bring same to ac-
count."
The complete changes will be drawn

FOX

SWITCHES TO

SIX TEAMS TO BATTLE

TODAY

TWO-MILE I

Trainer Farrell will throw open the
Varsity meet Saturday, to anyone not
in scholastic difficulty, departing from
the custom in past years of limiting
the entries.
With the Syracuse meet due on the
following week end, the crippled track
squad has got to be braced up in a few
events, or the Methodists will take a
victory. The hurdles, jumps, and
weight events are weak, and Farrell is
looking to the Varsity meet to partially
remedy this trouble.
The fair weather yesterday after-
noon gave the trainer the chance he
has been waiting for to put his men
through a hard practice. Several races
were held in the short distances.
Fox has been switched by Farrell
from the mile to the two mile race,
and will probably run in this event,
Saturday. Ufer has not yet recovered
from his ankle injury received Sunday,
and probably will be out of the mile
in the Varsity meet.
Watt, one of the two milers, also on
the hospital list is getting back into
shape, and may be able to appear Sat-
urday.
MICHIGAMUA TO ROPE IN 12
BRAVES THIS AFTERNOON
Under the historic Tappan Oak, Mich-
igamua, all campus senior honorary
society, will hold a public initiation at
6:00 o'clock this afternoon, when 12
juniors will be admitted into the se-
crets of the society. Following the
public initiation the tribe will go to
the club rooms on North University
avenue, where the formal initiation
and banquet will take place.

tories.
WILKINS WITHDRAWS NAME
FROM UNION NOMINATIONS
To the editor of The Michigan Daily:-
Because of circumstances which
make it impossible for me to return to
Ann Arbor next year, I regret that I
must withdraw my name from nomi-
nation for presidency of the Michigan
Union.
J. HERBERT WILKINS, Jr.
BIG DAY PLANNED
FOR A LL SENIORS
Tickets for the all-senior dinner-
dance, to be held at the Union after the
Swing-Out, May 12, are being sold rap-
idly by the social committeemen of the
various senior classes and at the Union
desk. Strings of lanterns will deco-
rate the scene, and if the weather per-
mits, the tables will be set upon the
lawn.
Immediately after the swing-out, the
seniors will go to the Union grounds,
where a 6:00 o'clock dinner will be
served. At 7:30 the festivities will be
transferred to Memorial hall where an
all-senior sing will be held. Immedi-
ately after the sing at 8:30 o'clock, the
dance will begin, lasting until mid-
night.
Because of the large atendance, it
is planned to devise some system of
checking so that each person will be
enable to dance every other time, The
price of the tickets is set at $2.00 and
only 250 will be sold.
Steam Calliopes Play Yellow and Blue
Three special trains, advertising the
San Francisco Exposition of 1915, by
means of banners and steam calliopes,
paid their respects to Michigan yester-
day afternoon as they passed through
Ann Arbor on the M. C., playing "The
Yellow and Blue."

Due to the postponement of the soph
engineer-fresh medic game, only two
matches were played in the interclass
baseball series yesterday afternoon.
With Wheat in the box, the senior
engineers allowed the fresh laws only
one run, while they were piling up
eight counters for themselves off But-
ler's delivery. By winning this game,
the engineers eliminated the first year
laws, and established their right to
entrance into the second round of class
baseball.
Ex-captain Haff, of the track team,
pitched the junior laws to their first
victory over the junior dents in a 12
to 4 game. Each team has a game in
the series of three, and the deciding
bout will probably be staged Friday
afternoon.
By mutual agreement, the soph engi-
neer-fresh medics game was postponed
until today. The scheduled games for

The first rehearsal of the giant cho-
rus for the Jeanne d'Arc pageant was
held in Barbour gym Monday after-
noon, when Prof. H. A. Kenyon started
the chorusites learning the steps to
Mozart's minuet, from the opera "Don
Giovanni." A large number were on
hand for the initial rehearsal, and Pro'
fessor Kenyon was pleased. Practice
for the main cast will not be held be-
fore the last part of this week, and a
full dress rehearsal probably not until
just preceding the final performance.
Individual members of the Varsity
band will be used in the pageant but
not the entire band as was previously
announced, because of the nature of
the music. Mr. E. V. Moore, instruc-
tor in the school of music, is busy writ-
ing some of the melodies.
Tickets for the pageant will proba-
bly be placed on sale the latter part
of this week, the time. to be stated in
the Daily.
Anthony Appointed to Militia Service
B. B. Anthony, '14, has received an
appointment from the war department
at Washington, D. C., for a position in
the constabulary service in the Philip-
pine Islands. He sails from San Fran-
cisco June 25.

this afternoon are as follows-junior ! up by Spencer S. Scott, chairman o

engineers vs. soph medics; soph lits
vs. fresh lits, fresh dents vs. all-home-
ops.
PAUL BLANSHARID IS PICKED
AS ORATOR BY SENIOR LITS
Reconsider Action Abolishing Office;
Memorial Committee Makes
New Suggestion
The election of Paul Blanshard as
class day orator, after deciding to re-
consider the previous action of abol-
ishing the office, featured the business
session of the senior lits yesterday af-
ternoon. Directly after the election,
Blanshard resigned from the office of
class toastmaster.
The memorial committee reported
that the suggestion of a campus bulle-
tin board had not met with a favorable
reception, and suggested a loan' fund
of $500 instead. The matter was laid
on the table until the next class meet-
ing, to give class members time for
considering the question before taking
definite action.

the revision committee, and will be
Adopted in the constitution at the meet-
ing next week, after being tabled for
one week.
NEXT UNION DINNER JUNE 8
TO BE ANNIVERSARY AFFAIR
The next Union membership dinner
will be held June 3, and will serve as
the celebration of the tenth anniver-
sary of the founding of the Union as
well as an inaugural dinner for the
new officers. Plans are being made for
a big affair and an exceptional pro-
gram will be provided.
CAPTAIN TO TELL STUDENTS
OF SUMMER TRAINING CAMP
Mr. George S. Shelton, Captain of the
29th U. S. Infantry, stationed at Fort
Niagara, N. Y., will give a public ad-
dress on "The Summer Military Camps
for Students, Their Objects and Op-
portunities," in University Hall at 4:15
o'clock tomorrow. The camp for 1,is
summer is to be situated at LudLgion.

The appointment committee has se-
cured appointments for the following
sniors during the last few days: Fran-
ces Green, Crystal Falls, Latin and
History; Arthur Wulff, St. Johns, Sci-
ence; T. E. Johnson, Coldwater, Super-
intendent; F. S. Pierce, Mt. Pleasant,
Secretary in the Normal School; Eula
Schlack, Fremont, Latin; Harvey Ro-
sa, Hancock, History; Myra Collinson,
Iron Mountain, Civil Service.

Round-Up to Choose Officers Tonight
The Round-Up club will hold a
smoker and business meeting at 8:30
o'clock tonight at the Union. Election
of officers for the coming school year
will take place. Plans for the annual
banquet and initiation, to be held Fri-
day, June 5, will be formulated

_--^-,

h-

FEATURES

-40MEN
MICHIGAN'S FIRST BAND GIVES A

SOLOISTS

THURSDAY B - -THURSDAY
hMAY 7th 8 P. M.
Tickets may be bought at Wahr's, Sheehan's, The University Music House, Goodyear Drug Co., So. University Phar

t

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