100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 15, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

U~l1'IJ N NA1 ILLJ..

ie

Michigan

a

V

ILL

Vol. XXIV, No. 14.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1913.

PRICE

FRESHMEN TO

GENERATE PEP
AT GATHERING
Men of 1917 Will Assemble for First
Time to Prepare for Class
Rivalry Next
Saturday.
FOOTBALL STARS TO ADVISE
NEWCOMERS FOR COMING SCRAP
Mass Meeting Will Be Held in West
Physics Hall Tomorrow Night
at 7:00 O'clock.

CANDIDATES FOR MANAGE-
RIAL ELECTIONS SAT-
URDAY.
-0-
Baseball Manager :-
Walter Emmons, Herbert
Muckley.
Track Manager-
Charles A. Crowe, Gordon C.
Eldredge.
Assistant Baseball Mgrs.:-
Percy Crane, E. R. Hazen,
Ralph F. Khuen, Chester H.
Lang.
Assistant Track Mgrs.:-
Emmet F. Connely, Lyle Har-
ris, Beresford Palmer,, Vic-
tor Pinnell.

CHEER LEADER
TRYOUTS TO BE
DISCONTINUED,

COUNCIL TURNS
DOWN PETITION

Student Council Abandons Plan
Account of Lack of
Interest Among
Seniors.

OF SENIOR LITS
Not Sanction Plea of Members
Who.Want Renomination
of Higher Class
Offices.

on I loes

WORKMEN PREVENT PLANS
FOR M. A. C. PEP POW-WOW
Plans for a mass meeting at the
Mlli~ auditorium -before the M. A. C.
game Saturday have been interrupted
by the work being done on the interior
of the guilding by the marble workers.
The marble slabs are being repaired,
and it is feared that allowing a crowd
to assemble on Friday night would be
disastrous to the repaired parts.
Witnesses Arrive for Saloon Case.
James H. Minzey, '16, and Ward
Hopkins, '16, arrived in the city last
night and will testify for the prose-
cution at the trial of Lawrence J.
Damm which will be held in the cir-
cuit court at 9:00 o'clock this morn-
ing.
UNION TO FEATURE
FRIDAYEVENINGS
"Lounging nights" will be observed
at the Michigan Union beginning Fri-

YOST MAY USE
.NEW MATERII
SIN BACKFII
Pontius Bastian and Mead
Effective Trio in Scrimma
Against Reserves
Yesterday
REHAINDER OF LINEUp ALS
- RECEIVES SEVERAL CHI

COMMITTEE WILL APPOINT
LEADER FOR REST OF YEAR

*
*

Class

Elections Will Be Held
Friday Instead of
Saturday.

on

"Men of seventeen" will hold their
first demonstration of class spirit at a
monster mass meeting in the west
physics lecture room at 7:00 o'clock
tomorrow night. The verdants will
listen to talks by Captain George Pat-
erson and M. H. Pontius, on "How to
Sweep the Sophs off Their Feet in a
Flag Rush."
E. H. Saier will preside, and besides
listening to live talks and practicing
cheers,the"hopefuls"will have the rules
of the rush and cane spree explained
to them by Arthur Kohler, chairman
of the rush committee. Captains for
the two events are to be elected by the
class as well as cheerleaders for the
contest.
Extra efforts will be taken this year
to keep the crowds back. Photogra-
phers will not be allowed upon the
field without special permission and
only a limited number will be given
permission,.
The rush is scheduled to begin Sat-
urday morning at 9:30 o'clock at south
Ferry field. A big delegation of M. A.
C. rooters, which is expected to arrive
at 10:00 o'clock, will help swell the
number of spectators.
Sophomores will meet Friday night
at 7:00 o'clock, also in the west phys-
ics lecture room.
GERMAN-AMERICAN ALLIANCE
ACCEPTS "MICHIGAN IDEA."
The "Michigan Idea" of sending fac-
ulty members to various meetings and
conventions was endorsed by the Ger-
man-American alliance at its national
convention at St. Louis, Mo. October
6 to 11. A report suggesting that all
' other state universities adopt the same
policy to further a close relationship
between the people and the education-
al institutions of the states was pre-
sented by Professor Warren W. Florer
who represented Michigan at the con-
vention, and unanimously adopted.
Professor Florer appointed one
of the five members on the standing
educational committee, thet object
of which is to extend the studies of
foreign languages, propose a unified
course of studies, further the method
of teaching foreign languages, and to
draw up plans of the unified civil ser-
vice examination for the teachers of
German.
The German-American alliance has
a membership of 2,500,000, being the
largest organization of its kind in the
world.
Soph Engineers Nominate for Offices.
Nominations for officers of the soph
engineering class, which were made in
its meeting yesterday, are as follows:
president, Albert Liese, Joseph G. Fer-
rand, Howard Phillips, Horace Corey,
and Louis B. Hyde; vice-president,
John W. Finkenstaedt, W. L. Given,
Harold Perry and Bruce Woodbury;-
treasurer, F. E. Kaufman, Richard
Jeter and R. C. Eastman; secretary,
Jacob G. Milliken, Howard Phillips,
Wesley Bintz. Elections will be held
next week.
WORK ON NEW POWER HOUSE I
SUBSTATION IS UNDER WAY.
Excavation is in progress for the
power house substation which is to be
erected at the junction of the old tun-
nel system with the new connecting
tunnel, between the medical building
and the gymnasium. It will provide
for the reduction of steam pressure,
when necessary, ant will house a
set of motor generators and convert-
ers for the lighting system. It will
be completed about the first of next
year.

UNION DINNER TO
BE HELD TONIGHT
"Thed Welcome Dinner' tonight is
planned to be the greatest membership
dinner of the Michigan Union," said
Werner Schroeder, chairman of the
dinner committee last night. The big
function will be held at the Michigan
Union at 5:30 o'clock and accommoda-
tions will be made for a 200 attendance
in the big dining room.
Edward Haislip, '14L, chairman of
the finance committee announced last
night that most of the tickets have
been sold, indicating a larger attend-
ance than at the first membership
dinner last year. However, the re-
maining admission cards may be ob-
tained from members of the commit-
tee or at the Union desk.
President Harry B. Hutchins will,
deliver an address of welcome to Un-
ion members, especially to the new
men. Talks, vocal music, and a
monologue have also been scheduled.
Selden S. Dickinson, president of the
Union, will preside.
SHIFT PROBABLE
ON FRESH TEAM'
All-fresh stock seemed to take . a
boost in the opinions of those who saw
their play against Ypsilanti Normal
last Saturday, but not so with the
coach. According to their preceptor
the youngsters became too well satis-
fied with themselves as soon as they
had the game tucked away by a com-
fortable score, and seemed to loose in-
terest in the quality of their work, in
the last two quarters.
Some drastic but as yet unannounc-

Because of the disinterested attitude
on the part of seniors toward the new
system of tryouts for cheerleader, the
student council at its regular meeting
last night decided to discontinue the
system for the present year. As a
substitute, the council committee,
which has been handling the tryouts,
was given the power to appoint a
cheerleader, who will act as head
cheermaster for the rest of the year,
and who will have three assistants
whom he will appoint.
The plan which has been on trial
last spring and this fall, originally
called for eight or more members of
the senior class to act as tryouts,
from whom the most popular four
were to be elected by student vote.
These four were to choose one of their
own number to be head cheer leader.
As only seven - tryouts appeared
last spring, and only three at the last
game, the impracticability of the
scheme for this year was apparent.
The appointment will probably be
made before the M. A. C. game.
Class elections in all departments
will be held on Friday instead of Sat-
urday. Freshman nominations were
postponed until the beginning of next
week, because of the 'other events
which are scheduled for the latter part.
of this week. John I. Lippincott, '14,
was appointed as council member of
the board committee.
Union Expects Big Mid-Season Growth
About 300 members were added to
the Michigan Union during the 1912-
13 season With an equal mid-season
growth this year the present member-
ship of 2,561 will grow to a 2,900 mark
in 1914.
LAVANS WILL BE

ENTIRE ARGUMENT RESTS ON
TECHNICALITY IN POLLING
Selection of 1914 Class Believed -to
Have Been Made in
Good Faith.
After discussing the petition by 24
members of the senior literary class
for an investigation of the methods
of nominating president and vice-pres-
ident last Friday, the motion to review
the nomination procedure was defeated
by the student council at its meeting
last night.
The reason given by the petitioners
for an investigation of the nominations
was based on a technical point. Ac-
cording to the interclass constitution
which governs elections, six men were
nominated by secret ballot, each mem-
ber of the class casting one vote. It
happened that one man received a
plurality, and the next three were tied.
To break the tie for second place, an-
other ballot was taken, each member
of- the class voting again,. including
those who had voted for the high man
before. According to the petitioners,
this was illegal in that it showedome
men, those who had voted for the pre-
vious high man, to vote twice, and
thus not only decide the first man, but
also the second choice. To remedy
the injustice arising from the method,
the petitioners requested the council
to offer a remedy.
The council acknowledged the pos-
sibility of error in the scheme, but it
was believed that the selection was
made in good faith, and that a reopen-
ing of the nominations would create
more injustice than to leave the case
in its present status. According to the
interclass constitution, candidates may
be nominated, by petition if the requir-
ed number of signatures are obtained:
The council held that this can be used
in the present case, although three
candidates on the ticket would cause
more complications.
EXTENSION SERIES
HAS LARGE FIELD
Prof. J. R. Brumm lectured in Birm-
ingham last night before the Ladies
club of that city upon, "The Escape
from the Commonplace." This is th
first of this season's extension lec-
tures. Prof. W. D. Henderson will de-
liver an address on "The Boy Prob-
lem" at the Detroit Y. M. C. A. Friday
evening. Further engagements are to
be announced at an early date. Prof.
W. W. Florer will deliver a lecture at
a meeting of the German Society in
Lansing Saturday, when the 100th an-
niversary of the battle of Leipzig will
be celebrated.
The scope of the state extension work
this year is to have various organiza-
tions, in adjacent territory, co-oper-
ate with each other, making some
one place their headquarters, so that
the specified 300 lectures may reach
a larger number of people.
The upper peninsula received 50
lectures last year. The cities of Grand
Rapids, Saginaw, Bay City, Kalama-
zoo, Battle Creek and Flint were cov-
ered by a series of 60 lectures. The
granges of the state were assigned
50 and 20 were given to the fraternal
organizations. The balance was scat-
tered.
New Rhetoric Instructor Appointed.
Dr. Lyman Bryson, '10, has recent-
ly been appointed instructor in rhet-
oric by the board of regents. During
his undergraduate days Mr. Bryson

won the Field poetry prize, and since
graduation he has been doing news-'
paper work both in Omaha, Nebraska!
and Detroit.

day.

Varsity Accumulates 21 to
Extra Weight Counts
Line Plunges.

0V
in

Tables will be placed in the

front rooms and dining room for card
playing and meals which visitors may
order any time during the evening at
"hamburger prices." There will be
no regular program but special fea-
tures including a card tournament will
be introduced later.
This will be a permanent Friday
night arrangement at the Union and
next Friday a contest will be conduct-
ed to choose a suitable name. Slips
will be handed out and a class pipe
will be given for the accepted desig-
nation.
The committee is as follows: Maur-
ice -Meyers, '14L, chairman; Perry
Howard, '14, George Sisler, '15E, Her-
bert Wilkins, '14, W. J. Clement, '15E,
Henry C. Bogle, '15L, and Donald Sar-
baugh, '16.
CLASS FOOTBALL
TO BEGIN OCT.20
With fifteen teams entered in the
struggle for campus supremacy the
interclass football season will open
October 20, Each team will play the
three others in its department before
October 30, when the two teams from
each department with the highest per-
centage will go into thd finals.
Each of the eight teams in the finals
will play every other team,'and the
winner of the campus championship
will be determined by a percantage
standing. All four classes in the lit-
erary and engineering departments,,
and the three law classes will be rep-
resented by teams. The sophomore
medics, the junior medics, the phar-
mics, and the freshmen from the med-
ic, dental and homeopathic and phar-
mic departments will put the remain-
ing four teams in the field.
In an effort to put interclass foot-
ball on a higher plane this year, Di-
rector Rowe has arranged for expert
coaching in addition to the aid which
the members of his class in theoretical
football will give the teams.
The following five men will coach
teams: D. A. Tucker, who coached the
College of Minnesota two years; R. E.
Kennington, who coadhed Butler Col-
lege two years; William Collette, -of
last year's Varsity; J. S. Crawford,
who has had four years of college foot-
ball; and J. C. Wiedrich, who played
four years on Kansas University.
FRESHMAN IS SMALLER THAN
HIS ANTHROPOMETRIC CHART

Wolverine football supporters as
see a new, and heavier backfield
action against the Michigan Ag
Saturday, if the men Coach Yost u
in yesterday's scrimmage continue
show form.
When Yost picked a Varsity to p
against the reserve forces yester
afternoon, incidentally behind clo
gates, he used Bastian and Mead
the halves and none other than"Bru
Pontius at fullback. And it may
said in passing that this combinati
looked good, at least against I
scrubs, for the three tore through I
scrub lines for consistent gains, a
only occasionafly were thrown f
losses by 4ealous reserve cohorts.
The remainder of the Varsity line
bore little resemblance to the "regu]
combination," and critics who w
permitted to watch the rehearsal, I
lieve that hte game was staged larg
for the . benefit of the new backfi
combination, and secondarily for t
second string men who were used
most of the line positions.
The Varsity triumphed over t
scrubs by a count of 21 to 0 in nea
an hour's play, but the scoring was i
the important part of the practi
session. The important part was t
manner in which the new backfe
conducted itself. With Roehm dire
ing the play from qu'arterback's pO
the heavy backs appeared to adv
tage, though naturally their work w
a little crude in spots.
Bastian plunged the line in ex&i
lent style, while Pontius tore off
number of gains by wading throu
the opposing players. Mead als
showed form both in ruIning with t
ball and kicking. It is expected ti
Yost will continue to try out the hea
backfield during other practices t
week.
Pontius was obliged to leave t
scrimmage toward the close, owing
straining a leg muscle. The inju
was not serious, however, and he
not expected to be laid up. Galt w
out in a suit yesterday, but did r
take part in any active work. Bei
ley, the other member of the hospi
corps, ran signals with the team Y(
lined up secondarily to the elev
which went into scrimmage.
The lineup of the scrimmagi
teams follow:
Varsity Srn
Tessin...... .....L.E.......ta
Cochran........L.T.....Dorran
McHale ........... L.G..... R
Traphagen........C......Peters
Allmendinger..... R.G.....Crossm
Raynsford, Scott.. R.T..... Rheinm
Lyons............ R.E........We.
Roehm.......... Q,........Meye
Bastian.... .L.H........Co
Pontius,Diehl....F.B.....Davids
Mead..... . . . ..R.H. .. Saier, Jen
FRESHMAN ADVISEES RECEIVE
NAUtS OF THEIR ADVISOR

BACK THIS FALL

ed changes are contemplated by Coach I John L. Lavans, '14, shortstop on the

Douglas in the personnel of the team
to enter the arena against Hillsdale,
their next opponents. From all re-
ports obtainable Hillsdale will loom up
much more formidably than the Ypsi-
lanti eleven, and a quick improvement
must be reached by the Michigan
Freshman, if they are to leave the
field next Saturday with their record
still untarnished.
With Craven and James, the two
ends who showed the most promise in
the early workouts, still on the hospit-
al list, Douglas must find a new pair of
flank men.
Daily scrimmages are the order for
this week, with no let-up from the
grind for anyone save the cripples.
The yearlings are expected to oppose
the Varsity this afternoon in the
regular mid-week game, and Coach
Douglas will probably try out several
new combinations of his players.
PICTURES OF STUDENT LIFE
WILL BE TAKEN BY FILM CO.
Michigan will break.again into the
movies on Saturday. The Universal
Film Company has planned to repro-
duce the underclass rush, the M.A.C.
Michigan game, campus buildings and
incidents of campus life, to be shown
at the Panama Exposition. The films
will also be used throughout the en-
tire west, along with films taken at
eight other leading universities.
On Saturday at 1:30 o'clock a pano-
rama picture of the student body will
be taken on Ferry field. Seats are now
being erected on the field to seat the
crowds.

Varsity baseball team in 1912 and part
of 1913, and now a member of Mack's
world's champion baseball team, is ex-
pected to return to the university in
the near future.
Lavans will receive a share of the
players' purse of the world series
money and in speaking of the use he
would put his money to, is reported
to have said, "My dad staked me to
about $2,000 to cover my expenses at
the University of Michigan. That
much of my money goes to him and
the rest will go to pay my way through
the coming year, which will be the
last."
If the new summer baseball rule
which is now pending passes the
Board in Control of athletics, Lavans
may be eligible for Varsity baseball in
the spring. This ruling might also
make Clarence E. Lehr, '14L, former-
ly with the Philadelphia nationals, eli-
gible.
COSMOPOLITANS WILL HOLD
FIRST SMOKEFEST AT UNION
Professors J. A. C. Hildner and E. A.
Boucke of the board of advisers to for-
eign students, Prosecutor George
Burke, Managing Editor Maurice Toul-
me, of The Michigan Daily, Manager
Fred B. Foulk, of the "Cosmopolitan
Student," President Selden Dickinson,
of the Union, President Paul Blan-
shard, of the Y. M. C. A., and President
V. T. Maw, of the Chinese Students'
club, will be the speakers at the first
regular smoker of the Corda-Fratres
Cosmopolitan club to be held Friday
at 8:00 o'clock at the Michigan Union.

Probably the smallest man ever en-
rolled in the university is Edward
endall, '17E, of Rochester, New York.
Kendall is 18 years old, 4 feet 11 inch-
es tall, and weighs 82 pounds. He
could not be given the regular anthro-
pometric examination, as every meas-
'urement was below the minimum of
the chart.
Theoretical Football Class Meets.
Director Rowds clas in theoretical
football has been organized and twen-
ty seniors admitted to membership.
The class will meet Wednesday andC
Friday evenings at 7:00 o'clock and
Saturday mornings at an hour to be
determined later.

Nine hundred freshmen yesterd
received cards notifying them of t
appointment of the faculty membe
seniors and juniors who are to act
the capacity of advisers during t
present year. To care for this numb:
of first year students, 120 facul
members, 90 seniors and 70 junlc
have been named under the new sy
tem.
According to an announcement
sued yesterday, all those freshm
who have not been notified as to the
advisers, are to report at the office
the Dean this morning between 8 :
and 12:00 o'clock.

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan