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January 18, 1914 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-01-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Second Semester

The

I the campus news every morning. If you are not now
DAILY subscriber, call at the Business Office across
)m the Majestic. Know what is doing on, the campus.

CHORUS TO TANGO
IN PARIS STYLES
Peg top skirts and tango dresses of
the latest model will be seen at the
1914 Michigan Union opera. The bal-
let dresses, which have been renovat-
ed and made over for nearly all of the
other shows, have been discarded and
the 32 men in the chorus will promen-
ade in slit skirts, with all the varie-
ties commended by Paris.
Tryouts for the chorus positions
will be held at the Union at 7:00
o'clock Tuesday night, when the men
will be tested in singing and dancing.
The terpsichorean art will be practic-
ed differently, as much couple dancing
will take the place of the broiler
variety.
Robert Braun, '14E, who has charge
of the costumes, has visited houses in
Chicago and St. Louis, and has many
attractive offers for fashionable
gowns. However, an agreement may
be made through a local firm to pro-
cure the outfits from New York. The
modern European setting necessitates
evening dress, and other conventional
attire for the many men characters in
the play, in contrast to the elaborate
trappings previously required in
operas of a mythical location.
The original copies of the music will
be used at the tryout "Tuesday night,
and the pieces will be sent to the
printer for finishing in the form of
both scores and sheet music. The win-
ning poster, and those receiving hon-
orable mention will be placed on dis-
play in a State street store soon.
On the whole the management is
encouraged with every part of the
play. Mr. Bert St. John was present
at the tryout Tuesday, and is es-
pecially optimistic, Ray Melton, '13,
who is the author, is well satisfied.
Armour nustitute Wins Chess Mach,
Armour Institute won first place,
at the second annual tournament con-
ducted by the Western Intercollegiate
Chess Association in Chicago, during
the holidays. Chicago University
scored second, and the University of
Illinois ranked third. Swarz, of the
winning team, proved a strong con-
tender, although the individual honors
were carried off by Stevenson, of Il-
linois.
Michigan was not represented in the
meet, as the arrangements were com-
pleted too late, to enable a delegation
to be sent. Plans for a match at Sas-
ter, inculding all the colleges in the
association are being considered.
TWO ASSISTANTS ARE ADDED
TO) iEALTII SERVICE STAFF.
Two assistants have been added to
the staff of the university health ser-
vice to meet the demands since vaca-
tion. The increase in the number of
students requesting treatment has
been so marked, that another physi-
cian may be appointed.
Sgyeral cases of contagious diseases
have been discovered lately, but the
health officers beliece these were con-
tracted at home, and there is little
chance of the infection 'spreading
among students.

Cosmopolitans Will Attend Function
in the honor at Detroit
Thursday.
PROMINENT SPEAKERS TO TALK.
Members of the Corda-Fratres Cos-
mopolitan club, 50 in number, will
journey to Detroit to attend a banquet
given in their honor by the Detroit
Adcraft club Thursday. The local
delegation will be headed by Prof. J.
A. C. Hildner, chairman of the board
of advisors to foreign students. The
afternoon will be spent in sight-seeing
as guests of the Detroit Board of Com-
merce.
William W. Welsh, '12, secretary of
the Ann Arbor Civic Association, who
is instrumental in arranging for this
gathering, C. P. Wang, '14, honorary
member of the Detroit club, Professor
Hildner, John A. Bonilla, '15M, presi-
dent of the Cosmopolitan club, and
Prof. L Leo Sharfman, of the econom-
ics department, president of the Men-
orah society, are scheduled to speak
at the affair.
A musical program will be rendered
ly William S. James, '15D, Marten Ten
Hoor, '13, and Kenneth Westman, '14.
The foreign students at the univer-
sity have been invited to inspect the
industrial plants in Detroit, during
spring vacation.
"11WDY FROSH" CAMPAIGN IS
FAVORED BY FRESH PHiARMICS.
Fresh pharmics decided to join the
freshman literary literary class in
their "howdy frosh" campaign, at a
cleass meeting yesterday afternoon.
This brings the entire class, with the
exception of fresh dents, who have
taken no action on.the invitation sent
them by fresh lits to become partici-
pants in the campaign, into the move-
ment to increase the acquaintence-
ship and class spirit of the freshmen.
Officers of the class are of the opin-
ion that there has been a falling off
in the spirit with which the campaign
was started. With this in mind, they
are planning "pep" sessions, in the
form of smokers and dinners, at which
appeals will be made to the yearlings
to push the movement through in such
a manner as to make it permanent.
PROFESSOR IDEN WILL RESUME
LECTURES AT BIBLE CHAIRS.

TNDE

yIc II

Construction work at the new uni-
versity power plant has been carried
on rapidly during the last month and
it is expected that the plant will be
in operation by April 1. The old
building will not go out of commission
at once, as certain changes in the
lighting and the heating systems will
make it necessary to transfer to the
new station gradually.
Most of the machinery has been set
up in place. The cross compound Cor-
liss engine, which will develop the
power for the electric generator, has
been put upon its foundation on the
upper floor of the new building. The
furnaces and the boilers, together with
the parabolic overhead receptacle for
coal, have been completed.
The three and a half ton traveling
crane, employed for unloading coal
from the cars, stands ready for use.
Below it, concrete is being poured in-
to the forms for the piers that will
support the track of the new electric
railroad. On the south side of Wash-
ington street the abutment for the
railroad bridge has just been erected.
Grading along the right of way has
been suspended temporarily because
of the cold weather. The fifteen
ton ash collector, projecting over the
tracks on the west side of the build-
ing, is finished. The ashes from the .
furnaces will be swept by vacuum
pressure into the huge receptacle, sift-
ed, and emptied into the cars on the
tracks below.
Two concrete driveways have been
laid leading up to two special en-
trances that will be used chiefly for
receiving new machinery. These drive-
ways are three feet lower than the
level of the main floor, and are for
loading' or unloading direct from
wagons.

POLITANS WILL ELECT
LF F OF E W i'UBLlC ATI (N.
on of members of the staff of
smopolitan Student will take
a meeting of the Cosmopolitan
wmediately after the examina-
'lod.
lub will chose the news edi-
the publication, who will look
ie Michigan section. An edi-
ommittee, having the ultimate
or the editorial policy of the
ie, will be nominated by the
n-chief, and approved by the
Appointive members of the
11 be announced at that time.
mendment to the constitution
ssociation of the Cosmopolitan
u North America will also be
AIE
lnAy-Tuda

londay -Tuesday
Wednesday
~UDEV ILL E

I
I

Dorothy,
togors & Co.
in a One Act Farce
3oIgor Bros.
inging-Dancing-Banjo
31atrico I
and Myers
Singing and Talking
Armen to
Bros.
Sensational Acrobats
NIson , Bros.
unniest Men on Earth
Thursday - Friday
Saturday
IUSICAL COMEDY
"TE
TENDERFOOT"
Richard Carle's Success,
1 PEOPLE -30
)ming H T
)Ofl T " "

AT OTHER COLLEGES
The degree of LL.B. "with honor"
will be awarded by the Northwestern
Law school beginning with next June.
To get this distinction, students must
not only be on the honor roll, but
must pass special oral and written
examination as well.
Columubia. Uniersity is agitating for
the introduction of intercollegiate foot-
ball next year.
Plns are being considered for the
enlargement of the Harvard Ca-op and
the construction of an entirely new
front for the store.
A i'ecent issue of the Harvard Crim-
son is devoted to a discussion of the
harvard Union, and comparisons with
similar institutions at other places.
11assachusetts Inslitute of Technol-
ogy and Harvard University have re-
cently drawn up an agreement by
which four departments of Harvard's
engineering school are to co-operate
with M. I. T. This will in no way
affect the separate existence of the
two institutions; the new buildings of
the Institute to be used for classes
in the co-operating subjects.
Cornell's 1914 football schedule, just
announced, provides for no games
with Harvard, Lafayette and Oberlin,
three of last year's opponents. A
feature of the lost of playing dates is
the game with Brown booked for Oct.
24 at the Polo grounds, New York.
Pennsylvania expects to have 500
men trying outt for the Red and Blue
track tean this spring,Raccording to
Coach George Orton and Captain Me-
Cir dy.
Volumes iinbIhrary Prove Popular.
"The Inside of the Cup" by Winston
Churchill, has been received by the'
library, but has never reached the
shelves because of the great demand
for it by students and faculty alike.
This novel has provoked considerab(
discussion and is the frequent subject
of lectures and sermons. The book is
being studied by the classes in Rhe-
toric 3.
Several pieces of fiction have been
received recently, among them Gilbert
l'arker's "Judgment House," Arnold
Bennett's "The Regent," -Gene Stran-
ton Porter's "Laddie," and Booth Tar-
kington's "The Flirt."
Other recent additions are a book
entitled "Primary Artesan Education"
by W. P. Welpton of the University of
Leeds; a set of four volumes on "Com-
mercial Gardening" by John Weath-
ers; and the works of Julius Wolf in
two volumes in the original German.
lockers Meet With Ready Demand.
Fifty of the 200 new steel lockers
installed in Waterman gym during the
vacation are being occupied. This
brings the total number in use up to
1800,.

Class Will Present "Silas Marner."
"Silas Marner" will be presented by
Prof. Richard D. T. Hollister's class in
interpretive reading at a public re-
cital in the oratory room of Univer-
sity hall at 8:00 o'clock Thursday
evening.

BOTA'NI CAL OGARDEN ShOWS
POSSIBILITIES FOR PARIS.
The Botanical Garden and Arbore-
tum, which is the joint property of the
university and the City of Ann Arbor
is a most perfect site for a park, and
arboretum, but the qualities which
make it most desirable as an arbore-
tum render it almost useless as a bo-
tanical garden, according to Prof.
Aubrey Tealdi, of the landscape de-
sign department.
Professor Tealdi has outlined plans
for the arboretum, through which he
hopes to make it a showplace for all
the native trees and shrubs of the
state of Michigan. The general plan
is to plant the knolls and hills, and to
leave the valleys open. Itwill take a
number of years to develop the park
according to Professor Tealdi.
The roads and roadsides will be
placed in order during the current
year to prevent further washing away;
some thinning will be done, so as to
open up several exceptionally pretty
views of the river and drives. Corner
posts have already been authorized to
mark the irregular boundaries.

TWO WA YS OF PREPARING
FOR FINAL FXA MINATIONS

fy Howard Hastings Cummings of the University Health Service.

A

The Wise Student.

1. Does consistent daily work.

2. Spends seven or eight hours in
sleeping.
3. Has regular meals and eats slowly.

The Crammer.
1. Is given to idleness and procrastin-
ation.
2. Reduces the usual number of hours
of sleeping.
3. Eats a "hot dog" at midnight, omits
his breakfast and eats lunch and
dinner in great haste.
4. Has not time for exercise.
5. Works in a warm, stale, tobacco
laden atmosphere.
6. Has no recreation. Text books, ref-
erence books, notes and more
notes are his companions.

Prof. Thomas M. Iden, of the Bible
Chairs, who has been confined to his
home by an attack of grippe, will re-
sume his lectures. On Tuesday, he
will discuss "The Bible as Literature"
and on Thursday, he is to consider
"How We Got Our Bible." The clas-
ses beginning at 6:30 o'clock and con-
tinuing one hour, are held at 444
South State St.
Reading rooms are maintained in
connection with the work.* Current
numbers of popular, scientific, and re-
ligious magazines are available, and
facilities for correspondence are fur-
nished. These privileges are open to
the students body without charge.
LIT FACULTY TO CONSIDER
CHANGE IN LIT-MEDIC R LES.
Dean J. R. Effinger yesterday an-
nounced a special meeting of the fac-
ulty of the literary department, to be
held tomorrow night for the purpos.*
of discussing the proposed revision of
the rules governing the six-year com-
bined lit-medic course.
A proposition looking to a change
of these rules was taken up a year
ago by the faculty, but definite action
was at that time postponed for twelve
months. At the previous session the
matter of the opposition to the present
rules which give to a student a de-
gree of B.S. for two years work in
the literary department, was taken up.
Dean Effinger yesterday expressed the
belief that a solution of the problem
would be presented at the Monday
meeting and that it would meet with
the approval of the faculties of both
departments.
French Professor Secured to Lecture.
M. Fernand Baldensparger, profes-
sor in the University of Paris, has
been secured to deliver a university
lecture on February 27. Professor
Baldensparger has written a number
of books dealing with the interrelation
between the literature of Germany,
'England, and France. He is at Har-
vard for the first semester of this year
as exchange professor.

SHiAIESPEIREAN CLASS WILL
RECITE PLAY "RICHELIEU."
Prof. Thomas C. Trueblood's class in
Shakesperean reading will give a plat-
form recital of "Richelieu" in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall at 8:00 o'clock,
Wednesday evening. This play will
be presented by the same cast, which
scored a marked success in the "Mer-
chant of Venice" earlier this season,
Each member of the class will have
an opportunity to display his dramatic
talents in one of the leading parts.
Rehearsals have been held in regular
and extra sessions during the past
week. No admission will be charged.
Farce Will be Feature of Soiree.
-"Les deux Timides," a farce by
Labiche, will be presented by members
of Cercle Francais, at its Soiree in
Sarah Caswell Angeli Hall, next
Thursday. The characters in the play
are cleverly drawn by Waldo Fellows,
'14, Cyril Quinn, Robert Tannahill,
'16, Ruth Crandall, and Emma Heath.
"Les deux Timides" depicts the court-
ship of the daughter of a timid man
by a bashful lover and contains many
humorous and complicated situations.
In addition to the farce, a short fenc-
ing bout between two devotees of this
French art will be presented. Musical
numbers and dancing will complete
the program,
W H IT NE Y
T H EA TR E
MOTDAY and JAN. 19 - 20
MATINEE DAILY - - 3:00
NIGHT SHOWS - - 8:15
NEW PROGRAM ENTIRELY
EDISON'S GENUINE
Talking Pictures
INTRODUCINC
JOHN J. McGRAW
(Mgr. New York Giants)
Olivette
Comic Opera. 2 acts, 4 parts
SEYMOUR, DEMPSEY and SEYMOUR
Kings of ragtime playing and singing
and"an all star feature program

4. Takes daily exercise.
5. Breaths fresh air.

6. Takes his usual recreation.

RES ULTS.

The Wise Student.

The Crammer.

1. Receives poor, fair or good grades'
and retains much useful know-
ledge.
2. Enjoys sound sleep.

3. Retains a good appetite.

4. Maintains his usual health and
vigor.
5. Is a help to his fellow student.

1. Receives poor, fair or good grades
and leaves his knowledge in the
blue book.
2. Loses the joy of sleeping or awakes
fatigued.
3. Thinks that his food is poor.
4. Lowers his resistance and is sus-
ceptible to numerous infections.
5. Is a menace to his fellow student if
diseased.
,. Reacts abnormally from his exam-
inations and his celebrations lead
to excesses. .

I

0. Reacts normally from his examin-
ations and finds clean, enjoyable
amusement.

PRICES
NIGHTS: Adults 26c, (
MATS: Adults 15c, 4

r

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