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January 14, 1914 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-01-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 14, 1914.

PRICB

E -- ^^

EVENTS FOR TODAY
Michigan Union membership dinner,
Michigan Union, 6:00 o'clock.

WOMEN DEFINITELY
LAUNCH SELF-RULE

PLAYERS CONSIDER
SCHEDULE OF 1914
More Than 66 Football Men Gathered
Last Night For First
Pow Wow

a

ITY

Wowen's League ice carnival, Wein-
berg's rink, 7:00 o'clock.
Faculty Concert in high school audi-
torium at 8:00 o'clock.
EVENTS OF TOMORROW

'Three

Representatives Front
{lhss Will Work With
Cominitee.

Each

HOPE TO BETTER SCHOLARS1IIP I R1AYNSFORID UR4IGES SCHOLARSHIP

ganization
it; Feel
o Be

at'

TO FILL
YT SEMESTER
Soph Engineers

Helen Keller lecture, Hill auditorium,
8:00 o'clock.
Fresh engineer informal dance, Michi-
gan Union, 8:30 o'clock.
Senior civil engineer informal dance,
Michigan Union, 8:00 o'clock.

S that might
n of the stu-

anined by the fac-
efore being put in-
il, at its last reg-
the semester last
nneth Baxter, '15E,
>sed plans to mem-
for their opinions.
body seemed to be
ich importance as
ht not be hurried,
nite action on rat-
tion plan, will not
ime.
ouncil for the sec-
elected as follows:
n, '14L; vice-presi-
s, '14; correspond-
an Trum, '14E; re-
Kenneth Baxter,
T. Ricketts, '151E;,
it, '15.
he second semes-
Ae Friday. and vot-

POSTPONE PICKING
CAST FOR OPERA
Committee Unable to Make Final
Choice at Tryouts Held last
Night.
DATES FOR TRIP ARE SETTLED

ior engineers and
11 elect one each.
nd pharmics will.
ake the places of
4E, and Spencer
erms expired au-'
i having been ab-
ings. The council
night, as being de-
all election rules
ating and electing
coming election
>port or votes, or
will disqualify a

>n of the soph engineers
Dn to wear a yellow tassel
homore toques, was refus-
sons given for the request
.ch a distinguishing mark
to promote goodfellowship
pirit. The petition was
because the council was
n that if such a precedent
phasis would be apt to be
ass and departmental spir-
n a university spirit. The
tinued on page 4.)

That the cast for the 1914 Michi-
gan Union opera will not be announc-
ed until the first of the second semes-
ter was announced by the committee,
at its meeting following the tryouts
at the Union last night. The list was
somewhat reduced, but it was found
impossible to name the 17 men who
will participate. In waiting until next
semester, the management hopes to do
away with the possibility of ineligi-
bility on account of scholastic deficien-
cies. According to General Chairman
Karl B. Hoch, the material displayed
last night was excellent.
The tryouts for the chorus will take
place at the Union Tuesday night. The
32 men to be picked will be chosen
for their singing and dancing, ability.
Inasmuch as dancing in pairs will fea-
ture the chorus work this year, the
tryouts are urged to pick dancing
partners, and practice a few steps to-
gether before Tuesday. Either men
(Continued on page 4.)
WRESTLING BOUTS
WILL START SOON
Wrestling will come into its share of
the athletic attention immediately af-
ter the examinations, when the first
matches of this winter's tournament
are scheduled.
Radical changes in the way of judg-
ing the contests, have been made. Mil-
ler Pontius, '14L James Raynsford
'15E, and Henry Lichtner, '14E, have
been appointed as judges, and will
give decisions in all struggles that are
not ended by falls inside of 30 min-
utes.
The classification of the different
weight divisions will be the same as
last year. The light weight class will
be for those under 135 pounds, the
welter weight for those under 145, the
middle .weight for those under 158
pounds, and the heavy weight class
for men over 158 pounds. The winner
in each division will receive a silver
cup as was the case last year.
It is planned to hold a meeting in
Waterman gymnasium Saturday morn-
ing, and the time for this will be an-
nounced later.
COLIA BIA PROFESSOR LAUDS
PLAN OF SCIENCE BUILDING
"Your new science building will be
one of the best arranged and best
equipped in the country, and the psy-
chology department will be the finest
I have ever seen. It will surpass ours
at Columbia, "said Prof. J. McKeene
Cattell of Columbia, after inspecting
the plans of the new science building
yesterday.
Professor Cattell is visiting the uni-
versity on his return from the race
betterment congress held in Battle
Creek. He was invited to state his
opinion of the proposed plans of the
new science building, which will be
submitted to the regents at their next
meeting, January 27.

Definite steps toward establishing
1 self-government among the women of
the university were taken at the mass-
meeting held in Barbour gymnasium
yesterday afternoon, when it was
unanimously decided to elect three
representatives from each class to
work with the self-government com-
imttee in formulating a permanent
system of organization. It was also
decided that these women should work
to promote sentiment in favor of im-.
proved studying conditions in the gen-
eral library, which is the first subs
ject that the self-government board
will consider.
The meeting was conducted by Irene
.Bigalke, president of the women's
mittee, and Catherine Reighard, chair-
man of the self-government commit-.
tee. Prof. A. H. Lloyd, as chair-
man of the committee on house-clubs,
discussed the beneficial effect of self-
rule upon scholarship. Miss Edna
Thuner, former president of the wom-
en's league, outlined the self-govern-
ment system of Radcliffe College;Miss.
Mary Yost, of Vassar, spoke on the
true spirit of the movement; and Miss
Gillette, of the university library staff,
'discussed the need for better studying
conditions in the general library.
Another mass meeting will be held
in the near future, at which all women
.Will be given an opportunity to vote
upon the library question.
UNiON WILL HOLD SPECIAL
DANCE DURING EXAM WEEK
The Union has planned to hold a
special membership dance on Thurs-
day night of the second week of ex-
aminations. It has not been decided
whether or not this will be a formal
party. At any rate, it will be conduct-
ed similar to the regular"dances, and
will be in charge of the regular gener-
al chairman.
Graduate Receives Lieutenantship
Arthur J. Kingston, '12E, has been
appointed second lieutenant in revenue
cutter service. The appointment was
determined by a competitive examina-
tion, in which Kingston was success-
ful over 12 candidates, including two
Annapolis men.
Will Lecture on Christian Science;
A free public lecture on Christian,
science will be given by Virgil 0.1
Strickler, C. S., of New York, at the
First Church of Christian Science, 409i
South Division street, Friday, January 4
16, at 8:00 o'clock. The public is cor-l
dially invited to attend. .

Football candidates for the 1914
Varsity met in Waterman gymnasium
last night, and discussed the plans of
preparation for the hardest football
schedule that a Michigan team has ev-
er faced. More than 60 men, recruited
for the ranks of the Varsity, Reserve,
and All-Fresh squads listened to talks
from Director Bartelme, Trainer Far-
rell, Captain Raynsford, and all the
third year veterans.
Captain Raynsford told the candi-
dates that their first care should be
their studies, and that with the exami-
nations safely passed, they owed it to
themselves and their fellow students
to put themselves in ihe best possible
physical shape for the coming sea-
son. lie urged further that the men
work out regularly in the gymnasium
during the winter, and announced that
classes in football instruction would
probably be formed.
Director Bartelme talked on the
schedule for next fall, and repeated
the necessity of all the men seeing to
their scholastic eligibility. Trainer
Farrell spoke of the perparation that
the Michigan athletes would have to
make to meet a team of Harvard's
caliber on equal terms. The Michi-
gan trainer expressed himself as far
from satisfied with the attitude of the
football men towards developing them-
selves to the greatest extent. He ad-
vanced, in support of'this, the fact that
the veterans on the squad never put in
appearance at the gym in the winter
but they are satisfied with the condi-
tion they can attain with the fall
training alone. Harvard men train all
winter and summer, and if Michigan
does not want to be disgracefully rout-
ed in her first clash with the peer
of Eastern universities her athletes
must show some of this same spirit.
The third year veterans, called upon
to speak, all dwelled on the need of a
long training season. Pontius said
the Michigan football players had the
chance in their grasp to make the West
respected in the East. If they were de-
feated, the West would not be given
another opportunity for years. Craig
impressed it upon the men that they
should come to the classes that are
to be organized, and take part in .the
spring outdoor practice. Torbet and
Allmendinger spoke along these same
lines.
Captain Raynsford closed the meet-
ing with the announcement that anoth-
er gathering will be called during

FRESH WEEKFOR 1917 WOMEN
nnoi-ation Follo wingIdea Among
Fren _Wi1111Be Inauiguraled
Soon.
Emulating the campaign of "How-
dy Frosh" among the men students,
the freshmen women will inaugurate
a similar idea in a "Freshman Week"
commencing at a date to be announced
later. To distinguish freshmen wom-
en, an appropriate green symbol will
be worn by each member of the class.
The purpose of the movement is to
arouse class interest and spirit, ac-
cording to the decision reached by the
class meeting yesterday, and all wom-
en who were not present at the meet-
ing are urged to find out the plans
from those who attended, as the main
details of the innovation are as yet a
secret.
VARSITY DEBATERS
LEAVE TOMORROW
Three Men Will Go to Chicago Thurs-
Clay to Participate in Big
Annual Contest.
OPPONENTS DISPLAY STRENGTH
After spending two weeks in per-
fecting their speeches in daily rehears-
als, the members of the Varsity de-
bating team will leave Thursday af-
ternoon for Chicago, to take part in
the annual Michigan-Chicago contest.
The three members of the team are
Sylvan S. Grosner, '14L, Werner W.
Schroeder, '14, and Samuel Witting,
'15. Grosner was alternate on the var-
sity debating team in 1912, Schroedert
held the same position last year, and1
Witting has been prominently identi-4
flied in inter-society campus debates.f
Chicago has a formidable team this
year, all of its members being gradu-
ates of the literary depa-rtmenttand
Phi Beta Kappa men. Harry A. Rosen-
berg, '13-'15L, won the Julius Rosen-
wald prize for excellence in oratory;
Arnold R. Bear, '12-'14L, was cham-I
pion of the class debating team in 1909,l
(Continued on page 4.)3
CABARETERS WILL
GATHER TONIGHT

Will

NEW ELECTIC
PLAN FAYQI

MAY ASK STUDENT BODY F0
GENERAL REFERENDUM
Directors Will Name Footall lI
Candidates at Meeting
Today.
Since all the candidates wh
announced themselves for athle
sociation offices have endorsed
rest election of student memb
the board in control, the qi
will probably not be raised as a
issue in the approaching electi
The Michigan Daily will the
ask the board of directors of th
letic association to incorpora
question on the ballots, that a
endum vote of the campus m
taken to definitely determine s
sentiment on the question.
The board of directors will m
4:00 o'clock this afternoon, ar
proposal for the campus vote a
presented by Louis P. Haller, '1
who favors the proposition.
At the board meeting the two
dates for Varsity football ma
will be named, the selection
made on a competitive basis.
the new system, only two me
eligible for nomination,Harold-S
ski, '15L, and John T. Naylon,
and these men will undoubted
named by the directors.
For interscholastic manage
which either members of the
scholastic committee or candida
petition are eligible, the followin
have announced their candid
Ralph Conger, '14, Carlton Jenlk
Patrick Koontz, '14, and Leon F
ritt, '15E.
Adna R. Johnson, Jr., '14-'161
A. T. Ricketts, '15E, have anno
themselves as candidates for sec
'of the athletic association; a
following three men have com
ward as candidates for trea
Harold B. Abbott, '15E, J. S. I
'15L, and Harry Gault, '15.
These candidates,. and any
who may declare themselves
the board meeting this afternoon
be allowed 50 words in which t
sent their platforms to the cam:
tomorrow morning's issue of
Michigan Daily. The statements
be in the hands of the managin
tor by 8:00 o'clock tonight.
RINK IS IN 000 FORM Fl
ICE CELEBRATION TON

DY CANDI

Not Be Issue at Po]
All Office 'Aspirants H,
Endorsed Direct
Choice Idea.

February when Coach Yost is
ed to be in town.

expect-I

1

READILY
CLUB PLAY

One of the most vexing problems
confronting the management of the
Comedy club in whipping the produc-
tion of Percy Mackaye's "Scarecrow"
into shape is that of reading the prop-
er characterization into the supernat-
ural part of the Scarecrow, upon
which the story is based. The problem,
however, is being readily met. m
The Scarecrow is the result of a
diabolical plot on the part of a re-
vengeful witch, to get even with Jus-
tice Merton, her former lover, and in
so doing she nearly wrecks the tender
romance of the Justice's daughter.
The Scarecrow's rival, however, suc-
ceeds in thwarting the nefarious plot
by the use of the mirror of truth.
Fresh Lits to Hold "Alphabet" Dance
An "alphabet" dance will bring
freshman lits together for the first
time after the holidays at 2:30 o'clock
Saturday afternoon at Barbour gym-
nasium. Dancing will last until 5:30
o'clock. Tickets, selling at 25 cents,
may be obtained from the social com-
mittee. The class dinner, announced
for next Monday, has been postponed
until February 16, at 5:30 o'clock, at
the Union.

With the 200 tickets nearly exhaust-
ed, the membership dinner at the
Michigan Union at 6:00 o'clock tonight
bids to repeat the success of. the De-
cember function. Chicken, orchestra
music during the meal and a light
program are hoped to give the affair
a distinct cabaret atmosphere. The
remaining tickets are on sale at the
Union desk today at 50 cents.
Frank Murphy, '14L, will introduce
the numbers, the principal of which
will be an, act by the Mimes. Profes-
sor Bunk, whose real identity the Mim-
es refuse to reveal, with a skillful as-
sistant, will prove that the hand is
quicker than the eye in a repertoire of
legerdemain lore. Prof. Arthur L.
Cross, of the history department, will
give a short talk, and a quartet from
the mandolin club will furnish a few
numbers. A. 0. Williams, '14E, and
Harold Tallmadge, '14, have promised
a dancing number, and there will prob-
ably be a vocal number. The or-
chestra which will play during the
meal is composed of the following:
Lee Parker, '17, Walter Fort, '17M,
and Henry Rummel, '14.
THINKS REPORTED STUDENT
UPRISING WAS UNFOUNDED
Reports from Philadelphia of a "stu-
dent uprising," in opposition to the
switching of the Pennsylvania-Mich-
igan game 'to Ann Airbor in 1914, are
believed to be unfounded by Athletic
Director Bartelme.
According to the local authorities,
the decision to change the place of
playing next season's game was ami-
cably reached, on the grounds of ar-
ranging a satisfactory schedule for
Michigan. As Pennsylvania has all
of her games but the Michigan contest
at home, the report is regarded here
as without serious foundation.

Weinberg's rink is in zero
form for the skating carniv
staged there tonight, under
pices of the Women's league.
fair will be open to the public
ceeds being turned over to ti
funds. Skating will contini
7:00 until' 10:30 o'clock.
Tickets for tonight's skatE
may be obtained from the me
the committee in charge,
Beatrice Merriam, '14, is c
The admission cards, which
cents, may also be obtaine
gate. The sale of tickets indic
a capacity crowd of J. Frost
ees will be in attendance.
GARGOYLE'S BLUE NUMBE
FURNISH SMILES FOR
All copy for the Blue numi
Gargoyle is now in, and will
sent to the press. The issue
pear January 21. The ma
drawings for this issue are
of Francis A. Bade, '15, and
Smith, '17. H. R. Schradzki,
furnished several humorous
and a full-page drawing. A 1
by George C. Caron, '14, am
by W. A. P. John will appea
number.

Miss Helen Keller, who will lecture at Hill auditorium Thursday, January
I5, on "The Heart and the Hand, o r the Right Use of Our Senses."

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