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January 11, 1914 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1914-01-11

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

vs

HARVARD OCT.

31st

WHILE THE
THE CHRISTMAS MONEY CLUB
OPERATED EXCLUSIVELY BY
THE STATE SAVINGS BANK
'pose of providing Christmas money. The plan for saving a definite amount is so delightfully simple and the sums involved
that it would make an ideal plan to provide money to go to the Michigan-Harvard game, without counting the cost. For
i student the opportunity to realize this cherished trip the Bank agrees to pay before Oct. 31st any membership upon which
time.
HERE ARE THE MEMBERSHIP DIVISIONS

to

of one cent the first week,
three cents the third week,
!. 15 you will have $1 2.75
t of fifty cents the first week,
week, forty-eight cents the
o weeks, Dec. 15 you will
$12.75

DIVISION 2 Payment of two cents the first week,
four cents the second week, six cents the third week,
and so on for 50 weeks, Dec. 15 you will have $25.50
DIVISION 2 D Payment of one dollar the first week,
ninety-eight cents the second week, ninety-six cents the
third week; and so on for 50 weeks, Dec. 15 you will
have $25.50

DIVISION $ Payment of five cents the first week, ten
cents the second week, fifteen cents the third week and
so on for 50 weeks, Dec. z5 you will have $63.75
DIVISION S D Payment of two dollars and fifty
cents the first week, two dollars and forty-five cents the
second week, two dollars and forty cents the third week,
and so on for 5o weeks, Dec. 15 you will have $63.75

DIVISION 25 Payment of twenty-five cents each w
for a period of fifty weeks,'Dec. 15 you will have $12

DIVISION 5o Payment of fifty cents each
a period of 5o weeks, Dec. 15 you will have

week
$25.

How Much You Want to save and We will arrange it for you. Come in and talk It over. A Special Window set apart for the "Christmas Thrift

TORY

Whitney

Theatre DAY WEDNESDAY, JAN. 14|NI"GH

I

dule of lectures,
Michigan upper
direction of the
an extension ser-
aesterday by Prof.
as the director of
ns call for forty-
to be given early
ast to come dur-

THE SEASON'S BIGGEST DRAMATIC EVENT
THE GREAT ENGLISH DIVORCE PLAY

BUTTERFLY

on the

WH

ses of covering the
ipper peninsula has
four circuits and two
been asigned to each
the tours, the ma-
ast a week, from five
e visited and lectures
is way the maximum

By Edward C. Remmerde, K.C. and Francis Neilsen, M. P.
THE PLAY WITH THE BIG TRIAL SCENE
Six Months in New York MANT $1i.i°A so
Six onth inNew orkMATINEE $1.00, 76c, SOc

One Year in L

Gladstone .. .........January
Manistique ... . ......January
Escanaba..... . .. ..January
Mackinac Island........January
Professor Trueblood.

28
29
30
31

as an-

THE CARE OF SUPERFICIAL
WO UNDS
by
Dr. Howard Hastings Commings
of the
Univ ersity Health Service.

ary 19
ary 20
ary 21
ary 22
ary 23

.ss ...-Jar
,fessor Hollister.

.April 6
.April 7
.April 8
.April 9
.April 10
Marquette Circuit.
Professor Jones.
.. . . . . . . .February 2
... February 3
.February 4
..February 5
Mfarie......... February 6
ofessor Henderson.
Marie............April 6
.. . . . . . . . . .A p ril 7
..April 8
..April 9
.April 10

Powers .....April 13
Stephenson .. . . ..April 14
Gladstone..... .... . April 15
Manistique...............April 16
Escanaba............ ....April 17.
Houghton Circuit.
Professor Henderson.
L'Anse-evening.........February 2
Houghton-evening ......February 3
Painesdale-afternoon .....February 4
Hancock-evening.......February 4
Dollar Bay-evening.....February 5
Calumet-afternoon ......February 6
Lake Linden-evening .'...February 6;
Professor Wenley.
Hancock-evening ........March 30
Houghton-afternoon ......March 31
Dollar Bay-evening........March 31
Painesdale-afternoon........April 1
Calumet-evening ..........April 1
Lake Linden-evening ........ April 2
L'Anse-evening ...........April 3
May Attend Buffalo Alumni Banquet.
Alumni of the western part of New
York State will meet at Buffalo for
a banquet February 6. It is probable
that Pres. Harry B. Hutchins will at-
tend.1

.
'k
*:
:k
g:

1.
2.
4.
0.
6.

Allow free bleeding.
Wash with boiled water and
tincture of green soap.
Do not suck the wound.
Do not poultice the wound.
If pain, swelling, redness and
heat are marked, recieve
medical aid at the Health

* * * * * * * * *
how to ('are for Skini Wounds.

*
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

COMING OF HELEN KELLER
OF INTEREST TO STUDENTS.
Education of Deaf, Dumb and Blind
Girl One of Wonderful Feats
in History.
Miss Helen Keller, who will lecture
at Hill auditorium January 15, on
"The Hand and the Heart, or the
Right Use of Our Senses," will offer
an opportunity of seeing what can be
done in the line of education under
the most trying difficulties.
Miss Keller was both blind and deaf
at the age of seven years, when Miss
Sullivan, who is now Mrs. Macy, con-
sented to undertake her education. In
three years Miss Keller had learned
to speak, and at the age of 16, she
was prepared to enter Radcliffe col-
lege, from which she graduated with
honors in 1904. While in college she
wrote the book, "The Story of My
Life," which was translated into 15'
different languages. Since that time
she has written several other books.
Last summer at Asbury Park, New
Jersey, she addressed an audience of
9,000 people.
Mark Twain once said, "The two
most interesting characters of the

Service at once. *
* * * * * * * * * ;*

.January
.January

26
27

TASTTIC THAR
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday
Matinees NDESDAY 3 P. M.
ALL VAUDEVILLE I AL L

Just before the opening of the pres-
ent college year, a University of Mich-
igan student entered a barber shop in
his home town, obtained a shave and
had several small pimples opened. His
neck became greatly swollen and a
few days after arriving in Ann Arbor,
lie died from pneumonia. This is not
the usual history when small wounds
are made in the skin, but it illustrates
one of the serious conditions which
can follow a slight injury to the cov-
ering of the body.
Everyone's skin harbors pus pro-
ducing germs even when a person is
unusually clean. A surgeon's hands,
after careful scrubbing for ten min-
utes, are not free from dangerous
organisms and for this reason he
bathes his hands in antiseptic solu-
tions and covers them with sterile
gloves. When the skin is broken by
cutting, piercing, tearing or bruising,
the germs find an entrance into the
deeper tissues. Usually the invading
organisms are met and defeated by
the white blood cells and other pro-
tective agents and the wound heals
readily. Sometimes the invading
germhs win the abscesses, spreading
infections and more serious compli-
cations develope.
Many curious and erroneous ideas
exist as to the treatment of superfi-
cial wounds. Many believe that it is
perfectly safe to open a blister or
pimple with a needle but that it is very
dangerous to use a pin. As a matter
of fact the pin and needle are equally
dangerous if dirty and, if clean, they
make a place for infective agents to
enter. The skin and the instrument
should be as clean as possible. A
common and dangerous custom is that
of applying poultices to wounds.
Dusty leaves of plants, pieces of germ
covered meat, sour milk, bread and
milk and numerous other articles are
supposed to be of service. A flax
seed poultice is of u'se in certain con-
ditions. A free flow of blood from a.
wound is beneficial but sucking a
wound is a most dangerous custom.
The wound is usually cleaner than the

nineteenth century are Napoleon
Helen Keller."
BIC CONVENTION MAY COME
TO :ANN ARBOR DURING

NO AFFAIR WILL
SUBSTITUTE HOP
IIm1lror% of Possiility of Big Between-
Sentester Function Found
to be Groundless.
Rumors which have been rife around
the campus, concerning a dance to
take the place of the J Hop, seem to
be disappearing. So far as can be
determined now, no big class func-
tions will be held at that time, nor,
will any of the fraternities combine
in giving a dance or house-parties.
It is understood among the stu-
dents, and campus organizations, that
to endeavor to substitute some party
for the Hiop would only invite unfav-
orable criticism throughout the state,
and probably some prompt and deci-
sive action from the faculty. It has
been definitely announced, by the
chairman of one of the junior social
committees, that the junior jamboree
will not be held between semesters.
Likewise those in charge of the sopho-
more prom are strongly opposed to a
post-season function. It was rumored
also that the eight Palladium frater-
nities were considering a function of
some sort at this time, but it is now
definitely known that no actual steps
in this direction will be taken without
the express sanction of the faculty.
Generally speaking, the members of
the faculty, as individuals, do not look
with disfavor upon the annual dance.
Their action in abolishing the Hop
I HITNEY

was forced upon them, by the
ment of the taxpayers of the sta
the attitude of the state legisla
marked former Hops. In spite
regard to the extravagance wh
individual opinions, however, it
extremely unlikely that they wi
look any attempt on the part
organization to evade the new
MAY SOON DISCERN COMET
DISCOVEREI) BY ST1
Prof. R. H. Curtiss, Director
Observatory, stated yesterday t
comet which was discovered r
by P. T. Delavan, '13, a men
Prof. W. J. Hussey's party in
America, would probably soon
ible to the naked eye. Accor
advices from Europe, the come
van will pass close to the ear
will soon be within sight i
hemisphere . Professor Curti
mated that the comet would be
thirty or forty million miles fro
globe from now until next Ma:
Fellowship is Open to All St
The opening of competition
$150 fellowship in the gradu
partment has been announced b
Karl E. Guthe. The fellowsh
vides for attendance during t
ond semester in Michigan's g
department and is open for
desiring to register in any
campus departments. ApplI
for the awarding of the fellows
to be in the hands of Dean Gt
January 15, at which time the.
ing board of the department w
upon them.

and
1917,

ENTIRE PROGRAM CIRL ACTS I

Roehm's Athletic Girls
FIVE GIRLS IN A SENSATIONAL EXHIBITION
WRESTLING - BOXING - FENCING, AND-SO-FORTH
NoT)-This Act is Refined, High Class, and Without an Objectionable Feature
ETELKA and IRENE Miss Eileen Stanley
MUSICAL COMEDY STAR
Hungarian Dancers Character Songs
DUDLEY & PARSONS The Keystone Girl
IS Mael 15 IN NEW
Two Singing Girls Mabel " ADVENTURE S
£'I i In a High Class Musical
3 Rosemary Grls Act-Piano, Violin, ongs
Two Shows Nightly. :: Entire House Reserved
THURSDAY B IT Y 4E
SATURDAY WEEK
Musical Comedy Success
LEAN AND HOLBROOK_'S GREAT SUCCESS

City Civic Association Joins University
Men in Attempt to Bring
Volunteers.
Ann Arbor has prospects of a Stu-
dent Volunteer convention to beheld
here in 1917, because of the joint ef-
forts of university men and the Ann
Arbor Civic Association. A committee
is expected here soon to look over the
ground and report to the organization.
Ann Arbor has a better chance than
other cities for the .convention, not
only because of conditions here but
also because its application was the
first one recieved.
Four Professors Attend Joiut Meeting
Professors Alfred H. Lloyd, J. F.
Shepard, Chas. B, Berry, and Charles
B. Vibbert attended a joint meeting
of the American Philosophical and
American Psychological associations
at New Haven, Conn., during the
Christmas holidays. The members of
the associations were the guests of
Yale University.
saliva.
Superficial wounds if allowed to
bleed freely, if washed off with boiled
water and tincture of green soap, and
covered with a clean piece of linen or
gauze, will heal in nearly every case.
If the surrounding tissue becomes red-
dened, painful, swollen and feels hot,
have medical attention at once.

THEAT

Monday JAN 1213 Mati
TuesdaySringnday Matinee
ZIZ'-ZAG JOURNEYS
1IIL~t)TALK
MAGNIFICENT ICMOTION
TWO Hours of interestin Instructive Trave
Distant Lands
Not Lectures? But Bright Breezy -T
Ilustrated withJiHundr
of Pictures
MONDAY NMATNGH P- "A FRICA

TUESDAY IEE P. M.

"SPAIN"

PRICES

25

q 4

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