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September 30, 1913 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-09-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

INTEREST IN MICHIGAN
BEGINS WITH THE UNION.

he

Michigan

THE LIVEST FRESHMEN
AVEA , SIT LL GREG' CAPS

I HE LIVEST
II~ ~ j ~ / GREY CAP

XXIV, No. 1.

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 30, 1913.

PRICE FIVE C

PRICE FiVE C

__

11

i HAS EXCEPTIONAL

President Harry B. Hutchins

ROSPECTS. FOR GREAT TEAM

1

Forty Candidates Work Out on Ferry
Field in Two Weeks of
Hard Preliminary
Training.
YOST CUTS VARSITY SQUAD
TO TWENTY-NINE PLAYERS.

rine Machine Should
Powerful Forward Line
This Season.

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1913 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE.
October 4-Case School at Ann
Arbor.
October 11-Open date-at Ann
Arbor.
October 18-M. A. C. at Ann Ar-
bor.
'October 25-Vanderbilt at Nash-
Ville'
November 1-Syracuse at Ann
Arbor.
November 8-Cornell at Ithaca.
November 15-Pennsylvania at
Ann Arbor.
* * *~ * * * * * *

*I

Have

te while some five thousand Mich-1

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* * *
UNION

'12-'13
Wed. .............256
Thurs. ...........396
Fri. ..............597
Sat.............805
Sun............891
Mon . ............1281
* * * * * * *

'13-'14
354
533
808
1151
1269
1670

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M E*R*R *R*HI*
-0-MERIIP

"JOHNNY" LAVANS WILL GET

igan students have been enjoying the
last good-byes with "the girl-or boy-
back hom ," there have been some
forty hard-working young men lead-
ing a life of hard labor on Ferry field,
They are the men who will fight for
the Maize and Blue this year.
For two weeks the hard grind of
early-season practice has been going
on. The work has been, lone minus
the large rooting crowds which will
mark and practice from now on. It
has been the hard grinding drill, min-
us the pleasures of the old Whitmore
Lake camp, which has resulted in to-
day giving to the University of Mich-
igan an early season squad over
which her students have just cause to
enthuse.
Just fourteen days ago this morn-
ing the first bunch reported at the
field house. There were a few over
two dozen who showed up that first
day in response to the invitations
which had been mailed out to promis-
ing material on the advice of Head
Coach Fielding H. Yost. From that
day on the players have been coming
in steadily.
Large Coaching Staff.
Greeting the early arrivals with
Coach Yost was the biggest staff of
preliminary-season coaches which
has ever taken charge of a Wolver-
ine squad. Big "Germany" Schulz,
Michigan's captain in 1908, All-Amer-
ican center habitually and the man
selected by Yost for his all-time Mich-
igan eleven headed the list. Michi-
gan took "Germany" away from Wis-
consin where the big fellow built up a
line in 1912 which won the champion-
ship of the Conference. But he is
back at his Alma Mater now, and
many say it is to stay.
With Schulz were Freshman Coach
Prentiss Douglas, star Michigan half
several years ago, and Intramural
Athletic Director Floyd Rowe, one of
Michigan's best track athletes. And,
of course, "Steve" Farrell was on
hand to extend the glad hand of wel-

UNION MEMBERSHIP BREAKS
LAST YEAR'STRECORD BY 3

ed the tussles of the regulars and the
scrubs, for with a single exception
the scrubs have been decisively de-
feated.
Old Men Battle Recruits.
With six "M" men working tooth
and nail to hold down line positions,
the critics are looking for one of the
strongest forward walls that ever
represented the Maize and Blue. Cap-
tain "Bubbles" Paterson,, at center, is
of course a fixture. "Squib" Torbett
at left end also is expected to contin-
ue his miracles with the basketball
plays this fall, but the make-up of the
rest of the line is still in doubt.
"Brute" Pontius, who played the
right flank last year, has been used
at right tackle so far, and with such
a host of capable youngsters after
the end position the coaches wiT1
probably leave the veteran at tackle.
Musser, Allmendinger and Rayns-
ford are veteran linemen of experi-
(Continued on page 9.)

IN ON WORLD SERIESCOIN.
(Special to the Michigan Daily.)
Philadelphia, Pa., Sept. 29.-"John-
ny" Lavens, the former University of
Michigan baseball player now with
the Philadelphia Americans will come
in for a full share of the "world's
series money."
Although the speedy little shortstop
has not participated in a single game
since he was purchased from St. Louis
by the Athletics, he is eligible for his
full share of the funds which are an-
nually divided among the players.
Manager "Connie" Mack took Lavens
from St. Louis when that club asked
waivers on him, and has been holding
him in reserve.
TWO WELL.KNOWN GRADUATES
TO BE MARRIED THIS FALL.

NO LENIENCY WILL
BE SHOWN HAZERS
Expulsion the Penalty if Caught,
Says Council Head for
Committee.
COUNCIL WILL MEET TONIGHT.

]
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Se
Fellow-students of
It is a. pleasuret
lege to extend to
courtesy of The I
word of greeting a
And in doing so, I
that your welcome
duty it will be to
guide, is a most g
one. Never forge
teachers and office:
and attitude your f
your friends and th
help you to the exte
whenever the occas
The year opensa

ptember 29, 1913. prospects of the University were nev-
the University:- er brighter. You are all, I trust, an-
to me and a privi- imated by a common purpose to profit,
you, through the to thb largest extent possible, by the
Michigan Daily, a splendid opportunities so generously
nd congratulation, given by the people of this Common-
beg to assure you wealth. We expect, and I am sure
from those whose that we shall have, your hearty co-
o instruct and to operation in all things that make for
enuine and hearty the good name of the University and
t that university for the advancement of its interests.
ars are in feeling That the year has in store for each
ellow-students and of you much of happiness and abun-
ey stand ready to dant success in the work of your

The engagement of Walter Staebler,
'13, to Miss Mildred Guilford, '13, will
be announced this fall. Miss Guil-
ford, who is a member of the Alpha
Chi Omega sorority, is teaching at
Sault Ste. Marie. Staebler is in the
employ of the Michigan State Tele-
phone Co. in Dettroit. While in school
he was business manager of the Gar-
goyle, and a member of Druids,
Sprinx, Owls, and Mimes.

I

VARSITY COACHES

One Thousand Six Hundred-Seventy
Members Last Night, Beats
All Marks of. Its
Existence.
MONSTER OPEN HOUSE WILL
BE HELD ON FRIDAY NIGHT.
Regular Saturday Night Dances Wi
Be Held Again
This Year.
Men with the little yellow buttons
numbered 1,670 at a late hour last
night. The growth In Union member-
ship this year is unprecedented and
there are already many more mem-
bers than the total roll of 1911.
The remarkable growth of the or-
ganization is partly explained by the
senior advisory system under which
first year-men are induced to become
Union members.The membership com-
mittee under the chairmanship of H.
Beach Carpenter, '14, has been suc-
cessful in its preliminary campaign
and expects to book hundreds more
during the organized effort of the
next few weeks. Particularly effective
work was done by the committeemen
who met trains and extended the wel-
come of the Union to new men.
"Open house" will be held at'the
Union Friday night, beginning at 7:30
o'clock. Every student is inyited. "In-
formality is the keynote of the func-
tion," said Selden Dickenson, '13-' ,Sb,
president of the Union, yesterday.
Prominent campus figures will serve
on the reception comimttee. There
will be orchestral music throughout
the evening and refreshments and
smokes will be furnished. Patrick
Koontz, 14, is general chairman.
The employment bureau and room-
ing agency under Charles Webber,
'14, has filled about 50 positions and
has a waiting list of 110. The agency
has cooperated with the Y. M. C. A.
and by this method more effective
service has been obtained.
At the "mixer" Sunday afternoon
more than 200 were present. Waldo
Fellows, '14, and Willis A. Diekema,
'14, did several stunts and the new
Miichigan Union song books were used
or the first time. Meetings of this
nature will be made a permanent fea-
ure both on Sunday afternoons and
>ther times available. By the use of
the new collection of melodies the
rnanagement expects to revive consid-
arable interest in Michigan refrains.
The regular Saturday night dances
will be held as last year, begnnng
ext Saturday. Tickets at 50 cents
,ach will go on sale at the Union desk
Chursday, The functions will begin
Gt 9:00 o'clock. Charles A. Crowe,
14E, is general chairman.
The offices of president and mana-
er of the Union which were formerly
n the second floor have been brought
o the west endhonthe first floor. The
acated rooms have been redecorated
ud will be used as committee rooms.
'he upper corridor and other parts
f the building have been redecorated
nd a new floor has been laid in the
ont dining room.
A special' campaign for members
ill be made during the next few
eeks. Those who have been partic-
larly successful in selling subscrip-
ons so far are Ralph Conger, '14
dward Wilson, '15, and David C.
al entine, '16. The subchairmen of
e comimttee aredKennethaBaxter,
E, Paul Blan shard, '14, Ralph Con-.
r, '14, Edward Haislip, '14L, John I.
ippixcott, '14, Maurice Lohman, '15M,
Troll Mills, '14, Lester Rosenbaum,
, Howard Seward, '14, and Harold
ilmadge,, '14.

ent of their ability choice, is
ion offers. President.
auspiciously. The

the earnest hope of you
Very sincerely yours,
HARRY B. HUTCHINS.

In a special effort to prevent all
hazing this fall, the student council
has adopted the plan of expelling all
men caught taking part in the anti-
quated "sport."
"Every student caught in the act
of hazing," said Councilman Albert
Fletcher, '14E, last night, "will be
promptly expelled from the univer-
sity."

DR. JAMES BURRILL ANGELL

r
s

A

As
if

ssocl lion

Has Erected Tent
For Incoming
Students.

TO SPEAK AT "Y"

to Care

EMBERSHIP IS GRATIFYING.

I

SHOWS SLISHT ,IMPROVEMENTI

come.
For that first week Yost and his
assistants went easy with the bunch
of candidates. They were all some-
what soft, and Yost determined that
this year would not be a repetition of
others when early-season injuries
played havoc with high Michigan
hopes. Practice in those old familiar
squads of four, a center and a trio of
backs, furnished the principal vehicle
whereby Yost put his men in shape.
Toward the end of the week the really
"hard stuff" of falling on the ball and
tackling was started. The "war cor-
respondents" who had been at Ann
Arbor since the first week, were there
in large numbers that day, for the
scrimmage told what Yost had been
keeping religiously to himself all the
time, the make-up of his first squad.
That squad has been changed some-
what since a week ago, and it will
probably be changed some more be-
.ore the Case game Saturday.
The showing made in those scrim-
nages has brought a feeling of quiet
satisfaction to thos6 who have watch-

A special committee under the di-
rection of Fletcher has been organized
to deal with the problem, Plans for
effectually putting the quietus on haz-
ing will be discussed tonight at the
first student council meeting of the
year, when edicts. regulating all inter-
class struggles in regard to hazing,
will be drawn up. Although other
matters will be discussed at the meet-
ing, the hazing problem will receive
the most attention, as it is determined
to let no one plead the excuse of ig-
norance after being caught.
The Council meeting will be called
to order tonight at 7:00 o'clock, in the
north wing of University hall.
Gargoyle Drawing Copied by Judge.
"A Dog's Life" is the title of a
drawing by Alan Honey, '15E, in the
issue of Judge published Sept. 13. The
illustration was taken from a last
year's copy of the Gargoyle. Honey,
who was prominent in campus illus-
trating and art editor of the Gargoyle,
will not return to school this fall.

following an afternoon of slight im-
provement, his pulse being much more
regular and -his breathing easier. His
condition has not yet warranted send-
ing for his son, Dean J. B. Angell, of
the University of Chicago. An attack
of heart failure Saturday noon, fol-
lowed by the development of pneu-
monia early yesterday morning is the
shock that has stirred the campus.
Dr. Angell was welcoming students
Saturday morning and at this time
subscribed for The Michigan Daily for
the ensuing year; at 2:00 o'clock he
was critically ill. Crowds flocked to
his home all day yesterday anxious
to learn his exact condition.
Mrs. Andrew McLaughlin of Chica-
go, daughter of Dr. Angell, arrived
Saturday and is continually with her
father. Judge Alexis Angell, of De-
troit, returned to that city Sunday,
spending Saturday night at his fath-
er's home.
Dr. Angell was stricken with an
acute attack of heart failure Satur-
day noon and from the first his condi-
tion has been serious, his age count-
ing strongly against him. During the
afternoon of the first day he was un-

able to lie down, as it seriously short-
ened his breathing. He spent a rest-
less night.
His condition Sunday was still crit-
ical, as his pulse' was weaker and'
breathing shorter. During the even-
ing he was up and down all night, ap-
parently slowing failing, although he
made a strong effort to appear in
good health.
It was yesterday morning that the
attack of pneumonia set in, causing
occasional mental wanderings. He
was able to read the morning paper
for a short time and then listened to
his daughter read to him. Late in the
afternoon Dr. Angell breathed much
easier and talked readily with mem-
bers of the family. His circulation

i

Coach Fielding H. Yost, Trainer
Stephen Farrell and Intramural Coach
Rowe will speak tonight in the Y. M.,
C. A. tent north of the association
house on State street. They will dis-
cuss the athletic situation and the
outlook for a winning team this fall.
Since opening up, September 15, the
university Y. M. C. A. has been a busy
place. From morning till night crowds
have pressed around the tables devot-
ed to the various aids which the asso-
ciation furnishes. It was found nec-
essary to put up a large tent on the
lot north of the temporary quarters
a week ago. As in years past.,the in-
formation and the employmennt bu-
reaus have been featured.
President Paul Blanshard, '14, of the
association stated that, while accurate
figures are not yet available, the mem-
bership is now larger than that of any
year previous at the same time. A
special committee has been appointed

was much more regular, allowing him,
to spend the easiest night of his ill-

i

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to conduct a campaign for new mem-
bers on Wednesday and Thursday of

ness -
"He is wonderfully game and his
long life of proper living is now
standing him in stead. The crisis has
not yet been reached, and we can but
hope for the best," said Dr. James F.
Breakey late last evening.
Dr. James . Angell, president emer-
itus, spent a quiet night yesterday,,

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this week, and Blanshard hopes to
make this year's membership record
a banner one.
Last night President Dickinson of
the Union, President Hulbert of the
Student Council, and Managing Editor
Toulme of The Michigan Daily talked
to the freshmen on the respective or-
ganizations they represent.

...a

I --



SUME OF THE HEADLINERS
LCOB A. RIIS, of New York
NEWELL DWIGHT HILLIS
MRS. ISABEL GARGHILL BEECHER
ROBERT IRVI1NG FULTON 0rtr
MICHIGAN-NORTHWESTERN DEBATE 12 Big Nub $1.00.
RICHARD D. T. HOLLISTER
PEACE CONTEST Liber l Commissi

SEASON 1913-14

I

0
ical

Association

For Sale at Wahr's and by Student Sellers.

ions to Student Sellers. Call Primrose, 1

,810.

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