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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

November 30, 1913 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-11-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

LA SALLE THEATKE SUCCESS

Popular Prices
Down Stairs

S

e Gre
Wiate SAYMOND PAINE
Late Star " The Millionaire Kid "

35

and

50

Up-Stairs, 35 and 25

2, 3

Matinee: : :

15 and 25

0

Pennsylvania students will ho
smoker at the Union tomorrow e
ing. The temporary committee
yesterday morning at the .Union
made final arrangements for this
together. At the smoker, def
plans for organizing a Pennsylv
.club will be completed, and pe
rent officers will be elected. SeN
prominent faculty men from the
stone state will be present to tal
the men.
Efforts are being made to enga
Jyennsylvania 'special for the eas
holiday trip. Information concer
traveling accommiodations can be
tained from P. H. Cunningham,
temporary chairman of the orga:
tion.

VE KINDS OF TREES
LITE MICHIGAN CAMPUS.
e different kinds of trees
on the Michigan campus,
o Prof. F. C. Newcombe of
cal department, who has
labelling each individual
total number of trees on
and the lawn extension,
ifferent kinds are divided
following 16 species:
elm, pine, walnut, butter-
ore, birch, horsechestnut,
ilar, tulip, bass wood, Ken-
e tree, white ash and ail-
'ROFESSOR TALKS
RAUPTMANN'S WOMEN,"
W. Florer, of the German
gave a lecture yesterday
Bomssengesllschapt in De-
auptmann's Women." The
ellschapt is a society corn-
etroit women, who are in-
the German language and
Soph Homeop Committees.,
:auffer, president of the
homeop class has an-
e following committee ap-
social, Daniel Clark,
Clem Allen, Joe Wickey;
h Stauffer, George Smith,

OFFER PRIZES FOR
ESSAYSON PEACE
To further a better understanding
of potent questions of international
consequence, the Lake Mohonk con-
fsrence on International Arbitration
has offered two prizes to the under-
graduate men and women of any col-
lege or university in the United States.
The prize, to be contested for by wo-
men undertgraduates, is for the best
essay on "International Peace." The
sum of $200 goes to the woman who
submits the best paper, while the win-
ner of the second place will receive
$100. A prize of - $100 for the best
essay on "International Arbitration"
by any undergraduate man student of
any college or university in the United
States is offered by the same confer-
ence.
Each contestant is requested to ap-
pend to her essay a complete list of
works consulted, if possible with
specific references. Essays must not
exceed 5,000 words, and be written on
ordinary size plain paper, preferably
in typewriting. Each essay should
bear a nom de plume or arbitrary
sign, which should be included in an
accompanying letter, giving the writ-
er's real name, college and home ad-
dress. Both letter and essay should
reach Mr. H. C. Phillips, secretary,
Lake Mohonk conference, 3531 Four-
teenth street, Washington, D. C., not
later than March 15, 1914.

IT WAS A SAD, SAD MISTAKE
BUT SONNY NEEDS THE MONEY.
"It was all a mistake!" How often
have those pleading words been ut-
tered to his honor. The austere judge
usually says, "Humph! D and D, eh?
Nineteen and."
But herewith we have the pleasure
to present old wine in new bottles.
The wine, or rather the spice of life,
is authentic. The clipping was mailed
to ye ed of this sheet bearing the caus-
tic and derogative exclamation "Oh."
Owing to the fact that the powers that
he will mayhap read this commentary,
we cannot express our sentiment, for
a diploma is a pleasing air castle.
Mere words are not necessary. But
we venture the opinion that the hero
of the tale of two cities, picked a
mighty poor place to go on the night
of the celebration, for Dr. Fulda lec-
tured in German, the Y. M. C. A. ha*
open house and the psychopathic ward
is always fantastic in the moonlight.
But we must cease, pass verdict upon
the letter and whisper comments to
your best friend.
The letter:
Ann Arbor, Mich., Nov. 16.-Dear
Old Dad-Somehow or other the De-
troit papers got me mixed up with
some one else and published my name
in the list of students arrested for dis-
orderly conduct last night. It was all
a mistake, for I went right home from
the game and went to bed soon after
supper, as the wind made me sleepy.
So if you should happen to see my
name in the paper you'll know it was a
mistake. I hate to ask you for money
so soon again, but could you let me
have $50 by return mail? I need some
books, some shoes, and an overcoat.
Affectionately,

'STIJ

FEATE

lay
r ODec. 3,4 ,5
One Show Each Night, 8:15

EVERY DAY

: : :AT 3:44

WORLD'S GREATEST SPECTACLF, THE

Wmakkk
91

YS

Presented in Eight
(8) Parts
Entire Show Lasts
Two Hours

Produced at
Cost of
$50,000
10,000 People in The ast of Players
NOTE-This is the famous original produc-
tion direct from a three month's engagement at
Wallick's Theatre, New York. This magnificent
motion Picture has never been seen in this city
prior to now.

PREPARE QIJESTIONAIRE ON
CONDITION OF WORKNt MEN.
A questionaire is being prepared by
Frank Olmstead, and Carl Guthe, em-
ployment secretaries of the Univer-
sity Y. M. C. A. and the Michigan Union
respectively, on the length of time and
compensation of the students, work-
ing in the Ann Arbor boarding houses
and fraternities. The questionaire
will be completed within two weeks.
Copies will be sent to all the employ-
ers and employees. From the answers,
the secretaries will draw up a set of
rules, governing the terms, unde'
which student workers will be em-
ployed.
STARTS CHINESE RESTAURlANT
TO CATER STUDIENTS' NEED)S.
To cater the needs of the Chinese
students at Ann Arbor, G. S. O. Chen,
'15L, has opened up a Chinese res-
taurant at 611 East Liberty street.
Many students, foreign- and Ameri-
can, are boarding at the house, which
makes the service of native dishes
a specialty. Two cooks, recently im-
migrated to this country have been
employed.
GR AIUATE W RIT''ES B(OOK ON
LIFE OF DARK CONTINENT..
Stewart Edward White, '95, has
written a new book entitled "African
Camp Fires." This is Mr. White's sec-
ond book on exploration and big game
hunting in Africa. The book received
a certificate of merit from the Camp
Fire club of America. The literary
honors committee of this organization,
which bestows such honors, consists
of several eminent writers; and such
a distinction is only conferred upon
works of exceptional quality.
Organize Women's Educational Club.
The appointment committee are
planning to organize a women's edu-
cational club soon. The club will give
women, who expect to teach, an op-
portunity to discuss educational prob-
lems. Stereopticon lectures and
speakers on educational subjects will
probably be secured.

J LIT SOCIAL COMMITTEE
PLANS CLASS GATHERING.
"Breakfa Dance" on December 6
Will Feature Opening
Number.
Plans for a successful social season,
have been laid by the social commit-
tee of the junior lit class. Feature
parties and dances will be the order
of the year.
The opening number on the pro-
grain is slated for December 6, when
a unique function, namely the "Tsao-
Wu," Dejeuner-Danse," "Fruestuech-
Tanz," "Breakfast-Dance" or what-
ever one pleases to call it, will be
sprung at the Michigan Union.
The men and women of the class
are requested to come alone. Tickets
for the affair will sell for 60 cents.
WORK ON TERMINAL STATION
NEAR GYN SHOWS PROGRESS.
Finishing touches on the concrete
foundation walls of the new power
house terminal station have been ap-
plied. The dirt that had been exca-
vated for the construction work has
been shoveled back around the out-
side of the walls. Large slabs of New
Bedford standstone are being placed
around the cement work that projects
about a foot above the ground.
The size of the building will be ap-
proximately 20 by 40 feet. The east
half has a thick concrete flooring ex-
tending about a foot above the ground,
and will furnish the support for the
machinery that is to be housed.
A new electric donkey, developing
ten horse power, is being used in the
tunnel work. This engine is used to
lower the 30 foot piping and the an-
chors and hanger supports into the
tunnel. After measurements are tak-
en, the anchors and hangers must be
hauled up and taken to the shops,
where they are drilled. Then they are
again lowered into the tunnel and fas-
tened into place. Access to the tunnel
is obtained through five large man-
holes, approximately two by six feet in
surface dimensions, located at var-
ious points along the tunnel.
Homeops Double Last Year's Number.
Michigan's Homoeopathic school at-
tracts students from all over the
country. Many are here from the ex-
treme west and south. More than
50 per cent of the freshmen now en-
rolled have already received degrees
either from this or some other uni-
versities. This year's frehsman class
is 100 per cent larger than last year's,
despite the new requirements, that
have been in force since last year.
GYMNASIUM TO INSTALL 200
LOCKERS DURING' VACATION.
With the opening of the interclass
basketball season, lockers in Water-
man gymnasium are all taken. More
than 1,700 lockers are now in use, and
200 more will be installed during the
holiday vacation.
Union Property is Better Handled..
Magazines and newspapers in the
Union reading room are being handled
more carefully by members, than a
short time ago, when considerable
trouble was experienced by the care-
less mutilating of the books and pap-
ers in the racks. In some cases per-
iodicals were stolen or whole pages
torn out.
Soph Engineers Complete Social Plans
Sophomore engineer social commit-
tee has completed the schedule of
events for the year. It includes three

dances, and two smokers. The first
of the dances will be held at the
Union on Wednesday night, Ddcem-
ber 10, and is called a "What is it?"
party. The date for the next one is
February 10, and the third will be
held about the middle of April. Some-
time during February a smoker will
be held at the Union, and another will
follow in March,
"What is it?" party will be chaper-
oned by Professor and Mrs. J. P.
Bird, and Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Kenyon.

I i'tcyTheal

MARTIANS TRY TO
GAINATTENTION
"In spite of the fact that next Janu-
ary the planet Mars will be the near-
est to the earth that it has been in
several years, I do not think that it
will be possible to determine whether
or not, there exists a race of people on
that planet," said L. L. Mellor, Assist-
ant in Astronomy, recently. "There
have been stories circulated that Mars
hl s been trying to signal to the earth,
flashes having been noted at the Ob-
servatory of Paris and also at the Ob-
servatory, situated at Fl.;staff, Ari-
zona. Mars is envelope.4 in an at-
mcsphere that is almost as thick, as
that of the earth, and it would take
a mirror at least as large as the state
of New York, for any one to pene-
trate through the blanket which en-
velops that planet."
"I have no doubt but that there ex-
isted at some time a kind of life on
Mars, but is seems to me that if any
planet is inhabited at the present time
that it must be the star Venus, which
has been neglected by astronomers for
many years.
"The men who claim that they can
see different canals and waterways
on Mars have made a life-study of
that planet, and even then have not
been able to show these phenomena
to their equally learned contempor-
aries. There is a good deal of auto-

S OPWINDOW
BY VICTORIA CROSS
A Beautiful Play Elegantly Staged. A Big Scenic Production.
A Dramatic sensation.
Every husband, wife, lover in the country should
see this great play that teaches a lessQn that can
never be forgotten.
PRICES
Thirteen Rows Orchestra.............. .......... .... $1. 00
Balance Orchestra............................75
"Four 'Rows Balcony............ ......................... .7 5
Balance of Balcony.............................. . . .5
Seat Sale Wednesday at 10 A. M.

ONE MIGHiT

Friday, Dec.

Faculty Men to Attend Convei
Dr. Campbell Bonner, professc
Gieek, Dr. H. A. Sanders, professi
Latin, Dr. F. E. Robbins, instruct(
Greek, and possibly Professor en
tus M.L.D'Ooge, will attend the ar
convention of the American Philo
association, which will be held in
ton, from December 29 to 31. The
(1o not represent the university
cially, as they go on their own in
tive.
Drop Water Mains Five Feet LI
Woater mains, north of the obs
again five feet lower, by the A
Works department. The ground
neath the pipes is being dug out,
the entire pipe line will be dro
together.
suggestion in the minds of those
fessors who do see the famous
tian canals.
"We, at Ann ,Arbor, are as far n
of the equator as Prof. W. J. Huss
South America, is south of it, s(
will have an equally good opporti
of viewing the planet when it sv
near to the earth next January."

HARVEY D. ORR Offers the New Success

LIFE'S

Whitney

Theat

Saturday Evening, Dec
Annual Engagement of

CHAUNCEYi
LOOT

PRICES
NICHTS MATINEES
All Seats - - 25 Cents Adults - . - 25 Cents
Down-Stairs Reserved
Box Seats - - 35 Cents Children - - - 15 Cents
Children full price, and - One of the greatest attrac-
every child must have tions ever conceived for
a ticket. children.
Box Office Open Daily, 3 to 4; 7 to 10

In a New Play by Rida Johnson Young
AEEN DHV
DIRECTION OF HENRY MILLER
Mr. Olcott Sings Five New Songs
PRICES
1st Four Rows Orchestra ......... .. . $2.00
Balance of Orchestra.. . .1.50
1St Four Rows Balcony................. .....1.00
Balance Balcony7...........................5c
Gallery ........................ . ...50c
Box seats .00
MAIL ORDERS NOW

I

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