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October 31, 1913 - Image 1

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1913-10-31

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I

)TE ON 31 W DAYI

lC

[cni _ _ ii'
ARBOR,, MICHIGAN, FPIIA.Y, OCTOBER 83t, 19:118.

CONFERENCE O1
WILL WATCH FOR (i

IV, No. 28. ANN

PRICE FIVE C

____ _
6 ,

TEACHES

NEW YORK SIN(WR CHANGMS
A N NARBOR DATrE 1TO tO'NI) AY

N TO MEET

tin; ixaer of Mar~damne
l fires C'halige of Phlns;
)Iana1tgemnt.

Mat zeiiaatier
to cal

EASTERNSHIFT
Instructs His Meu in Ifeeting the
Syracuse Attack in Session
of Secret Practice
Yesterday.
TORBET LOOKS LIKE GOD)
FULL IN FIRST SCRDIAG E
Varsity Scores Bl; One Touchdown
in Short Session
With Scrubs.
There was secret practice on Ferry
field last night, not even the wily
ones who usually drift down from in-
ter-class practice being allowed on
the field. Behind closed gates Yost
gave Torbet his first trial at fullback
in a short scrimmage, and then devot-
ed the remainder of the afternoon to
building up a system of defense
against the shifty Syracuse attack.
Lining up his regulars against the
scrubs on the baseball diamond, Ken-
nedy's youngsters walked slowly
through the Methodist evolutions, as
taught them by "King" Cole, while
Yost carefully instructed his men in
the proper method of warding off the
eastern style of offensive tactics.
The particular play which the
coaches worked with was the peculiar
shift formation in which the whole
line moves down the line of scrim-
mage, a man near the end of the line
taking the ball and making the pass
to the backs. In scrimmage either
night the play has failed to bother the
Varsity for the reason that the line-
men called upon to pass the ball sel-
dom handled the leather properly,
fumbles being tho rule.
On Saturday, however, no such
bungling will be in evidence, but
Yost's men have been thoroughly
drilled in stopping the play, and it
sbould not be an extraordinarily good
ground gainer. Michigan had nuc
troubl~e in stopping the Minnesota
shift three years ago, and the elements
of the two attacks are the same.
In the scrimmage practice, which
lasted a bare quarter of an hour, the
Varsity hammered the scrubs for one
touchdown. Torbet's smashes off
tackle featured the mit-up, while a;
pass, Torbet to Lyons, was the fea-
ture of the fray. Roehm interfered
with the lanky flanker, who almost
had the ball in his arms.
The plunges of Torbet, Bastian and
Galt carried the ball steadily down
the field, after an interchange of kicks
and basketball tactics in the center
of the field, and Bushnell went over
for the score. McHale was the play-
(Continued on page 4)
ACTIVE STUDENTS
ARE FOR RETURN
We favor at mmediate return to
the Conference uitler the present Coi.-
ference rules Aswer an unqualified
eyes" or "flo"
Michigamu, members, editors of
student publications, upper class
presidents and oflicers of the Y. M. C.
A., gave a substantial mgjprity of "yes"
votes in The Michigan Daily canvass
yesterday. Follow1ag are the results
in detail;
Ifichigamua.
Yestf Rober~t Braun, Miller Pontius,
Louis Haller, H. Beach Carpenter,
Willis A. Diekema, Arthur Kohler,
Charles Crowe, Morris A. Milligan,
Spencer Scott, George Ballentine, Karl
(Continued on patge 3.)

A telegram from the New York
manager of Madame Matzenauer, Met-
ropolitan opera star, who will appear
in, the Choral Union series, states that
on account of change in plans it will
be necessary for her to appear in Ann
Arbor, Monday evening, November 3,
instead of on the date originally an-
nounced. While a change of date is
usually regrettable, in this case it
will meet with general approval, since
the Paderewski concert, which was to
have opened the series, was potiponed
to March 2.
SYRACUSE SENDS
BIG SQUAD HERE
Orangemen Find Little Trouble Solv-
ing Wolverine Plays Used
by Fresh.
COACh MAKES SHIFT IN LINE.
(Special to The Michigan Daily.)
SYRACUSE, N. Y., Oct. 30.-Pro.
nounced ready to give the Michigan
Wolverine the battle of its life, the
Syracuse Varsity squad left this city
tonight on its way to Ann Arbor for
Saturday's game.
Coach O'Neill took a big squad with
him, recent shifts in the line-up mak-
ing it impossible to tell right now who
will start in the game. The coach
himself will probably not know until
he looks over his men on Saturday
morning,
In the last praCtices pf the week
the Orangemen have shoWn all kinds
of fight and aggressiveness.. In the
clashes with the freshmen, schooled
in' Wolverine methods, the Varsity
have had little trouble in coming off
first best. The regulars succeeded not
only in dumping all attempts of the
youngsters to score but managed to;
reel off long gains seemingly at will.'
O'Neill has been drilling his men in
the forward pass during the past two
days and it is believed that the basket-
ball play will figure prpminently in
the Orange offense. Half Back Castle
and Quarter Seymour, each of them
stams, are being used in this pluay and
have proved themselves adepts. The
switching of Farber to end in place of
Travis has taken away the possibility
of using this man on the receiving end
of any passes, for although Farber is
a demon at tackling he' is weak on
handling throws.
Another shift which it is believed
will strengthen the Varsity is the
placing of Shufeldt at an end opposite
Farber. Forsyth and Bose have up-
held their reputations as ground gain-
2rs and will probably do a majority of
he work in carrying the ball on the
Michigan field, Saturday.
FACULTY CONCERT PLEASES
MANY VISITING TEACHERS.
Program by School of Music is Well
Ieleived by Large Audience
in Hill Hall.
Enthusiasm marked the first com-
plimentary concert of the school of
music faculty, which was well receiv-
ed by a large audience of visiting
teachers, Thursday night, in Hill au-
ditorium. Mr. Ilowland and Mrs.
George B. Rhead, of the school of mu-
sic, and Miss Florence Hinkle and Mr.
L. L. Renwick, visiting artists, made
up the individual program. The Chor-
al Union under Professor Albert A.
Stanley, ably assisted by Earl Moore.,
sang portions of Gounodi's music.

EDITORIAL COMMENT
'H1ERE IS M -l IC \IGAN'S E11 ?
You say that iichigan witl be hu-
miliated, if she goes back into the,
Conference, in spite of- the fact, that
she has been assured a public invit a-
tion, if she will but show signs of ac-
coptanco?
lBut how's this for humiliation un-
der the present conditions and ,in-
der the conditions that will be inten-
sified if Michigan refuses the advances
of the Conference?
Vanderbilt dropped Michigan from
her schedule in 1912, even after vig-
orous protests from Michigan and dire
threats for the future, Vanderbilt,
took Harvard instead of Michigan.
Vanderbilt turned Michigan down.
in 1913 Michigan found herself un-
able to live up to the threats of 1912
and Vanderbilt was the only alterna-
tive. And Vanderbilt said come down
to Nashville and M-ichtin mwent.
Where is Y:ichigan's :
"OPEN SESAME."
Michigan need but express a will-
ingness to return to the Conference1
and she will be extended a unanlimols I
invitation. -
We base this prediction upon a let-
ter that was received by a Michigant
official from an official of the highest

COMMUNICATIONS
I xitor. TIhe lidhn i )ily :
"i'rior to the founding of the Univer-
sit y of Chicago, Michigan University
wva at liberty to play games with aui
one east or west. Among others, gam-
es were exchanged frequently with
Core ci University and our teams went
it New England and into the middle
states and played without let or bin-
drance. \With the coming 01 IMrt. A ion-
0 Stagg to the we_1tthehe purification
' athletics was soon begun. One of
the methods proposed by Mr. Stagg
was that all games with other' teams
iueludting Michigan must be played 1o
the Chicago hield. Another of the stip-
ulations was that the teams coming
would be allowed a percentage by (Chi-
cago. While this percentage was n
cr absolutely fixed there was a fee)'i
pi Avalent. that it should not exeed
twenty per cent-
1-; - t Stagg at e
was Mr. Charles Baird of Michigan
an i back of hin was our athletc'
hboard an da1 sck of Mele board was the
faculty and the Beard of Regents and
the student body and the Daiiy. Mr.
Balaird nietly made an arrangement
with the University of Illinois and the
University of Wiseonsin by which
these universities agreed that they
would not play Mr. $tagg's teams un-

Buildi sI liithe inllv yby
1i' 'ock' fo br meetfing o thMe
Moet :i ( 'eah'AWs as1ociatioiand

:,
tr,
*
*:
*:
:*

SIX THOUSAND
TEACHERS. MEET
ICONVENTIO1N
n us1liinly Large Attendance Mark
Sixty-First Annual Convention
of Michigan State
Teachers.
hA RBY LANE WILSON WILL
President Hut chins Opened the Con
cve With His Address
of Welcome.

standing in one of the largest Confer-
ence universities. The official not on-
ly promised his own hearty support
but predicted that Michigan could rest
assured that she wonld get this unani-
mous invitation.
T.1he letter was confidential, and we
are prevented from using the name of
the author at this time. llowever The

der such conditions. It was custom-
arv to pilay agame in Chicag o on
Tlhanksgiving day. Wisconsin and
Michigan arranged for n game i Chi-
engo on that day and secured a field
on which to play. Mr. Stagg was cn-
p' led to secure a team from the cast
and secured Brown 'niversity. The
two games were played in Chicago oml

Wil ~'-s etrn to ('ifrn
ety willneet at 7:30 o'clock t his v-
ain; in Uiv ersity tHall. 'the feanure
c1tin' jprogram1111Will be a geneIrl Itwo
ainute debate "Resolved that Michi-
gan sioud return to the Conference."
AN EARLY START
ifl 'leetWg Will ommence in hill
.\dito'irutm at 6:11 Sharp
ls ETenim T K
ls'lE ) la WTON, 'l1, WILL 'ITALK.
'he kickoff is scheduled for tomor-
row at 2:30 o'clock, but the first
uartcer of the Orange-Wolverine bat-
le will really begin at 6:15 o'clock to-
night when it is exp(ecte d that t,000
students will make the most of Hill
audi tori's acoustie properties. It
is the second mass meeting of 1918 and
absolutely the biggest ever held in
Michigan.
Mni higan's visiting tt'achers will oc-
"ugy the auditori imt lter i the cv-
cuing, and tbe buildi; inmt be veady
for the guests at '7:15 star'p. Although
6:15 is erhle' than the management
desiWed it is the only time available
l'or the meeting, and toe success of the
" 1 " 5CsiO1n reqir's that pooters
eat their dinners early ernd be in their
seats promptly at li:1 5 o'clock.
Fred awton, '11, of Detroit, has
promisedl to be preseid. with mass
nm.eethtgielo q1u( e andPr dtlk'of. ~Bradley,
. Thempson of 'the law department
Yvit repi'cent the Eaculty with a short
talk. The Varsity band and Earl Moore
at the Co nmbian organ w ill furnish
the music. Edward Renip wviii lead
the singi g a1d Carroll Haff al yel!
imaster' Will try out the new yells
which have been suhmitted In this
week's contest.
Up to Ist night uo cartoons had
been ban d In to l yn don and cam-
pus a rttsts who have any football ideas
should express them in pen and ink
and have them n by noon. Lyndon
will presbe i the lantern with a new
set 01' v iews

Michigan Daily stands ready to pio- the same d.ty and to Mr. SIagg's sur-
duce this letter to any one who doubts prise the Michigan-Wisconsin game
the authenticity of the above stite- had by far the larger atte:ne.
mleni ts.'i
mets Tis fact brought M r. Stagg to timn'
anid hu' then agreed that Michigan or
THE WORLD MIGHT tME To AN other notable teams playing C -h ago
NDshould receive one half ot' the net gate
There is no r 'lI n receipts at all games: that ene game
at present, either limiting tie number was to be playd on i\arshall field and I
of football games that one university that the following game the next yeai'
(Continued on page 4.) (Continued on page 4)4
WESTERN CONFERENCE 9UESTION BOX
(Editor's Note-In order to avoid any possible criticism which may
arise as to the non-partisanship of the a'nswers given in this Question Box,
two replies to each query will be given. Cue wvilt be given by T. i1'vley Tap-
ping, '11-'16L, a member of1 The Michigan Daily t'orce, who will 'epresent the
Pro-Conference sid of the dispute. T he 'other answer will be give by a'n
Anti-Conference represen tati\'e..
The (neStions should be addressed to the Qucstion Box Editor and should!
be short. The queries must be signed with the ame of the author, ltbough
upon request editors will sign the quies tinsi pith the nitmal. m£d ciss t1um-
orals.)

Six thousand school teachers flock(
into Ann Arbor yesterday for the si
ty-first annual convention of the Micl
igan State Teachers' association.
Trains, trolleys and motor ca:
brought a stream of visitors all da
and the committees were kept but
housing the guests. Every part of th
state is represented at the conclav
some of the instructors corning fro
the far off northern peninsula. Thei
are also many prominent educator
from other Parts of the &ountry.
The first session of the conventio
was opened in the afternoon in Hi
auditorium. President Harry B. Hutch
ins addressed theP visitors, welcomin
them to the university and grantin
them the privileges of the campu
Earl Baarues, formerly of Cornell un
versity, was the other speaker on th
program. His subject was "Ninet
Years of Life and What to Do Wit
Thent,."Following this the conventio
vent into busintss session, transact
ing the routine matters neces'sary t
the tpjnung of the cqnclave.
jFriday will see the convention i
full swin, There are meetings sched
pled for every department of educa
Lion at which papers dealing with th
different phases of the particula
branch of learning will be given b
various educators. In addition ther
is to be a musical program in the Hi
auditorim.
H arry ,Lane Wilson, deposed ambas
sador to Mexico, is the principa
liteaker on the general program. Ni
Wilson will talk on the "Mexican Sit
nation." Although it has been som
little time since Mr. Wilson severe
his connections with the state depart
nent of the government, his know.
edge of the Huerta administration an
the present critical state of affairs i
Mexico will give him an opportunit
to tell 'a little of the real trouble tha
is thratening this cou'ntry in its p
sition as "mother" of the western hen
isphere.
A lthough the teachers are missin
some of the real collegiate atmosphe
(Continued on page 4)
DIRECTORY 'BREAKS

1. If Michigan goes back into the
Conference would it bo practicable for
Michigan to play Wisconsht, Minmeso-
ta anid Chicago every year--or must
she play, or be expected to play, Pur-
due, Indiana, Northwestern or Iowa-
to keep them in good humor?
Is there any Conference rule which
says that if Michigan plays Wisconsin,
Minnseota. and Chicago in one year---
the next year she cannot play them
but must play some other school in
the Conference? A. Buckner, '14.
Pro: There is no known reason why
Michigan could not play Chicago, Wis-
consin and Minnesota every year1
should those schools be willing, as it is
to be presumed they will, to scheduleJ
games with the Wolverines. More-
over, there is nothing in the Confer-

ellee code \which would prohibit Mich-4
igan fom t playing none save these mni-
V('rsities. T appin.
Anti: If we return to the Confer-
ence it is possible that games <ould
b arranged wkh Wisconsin, Minne-
sota and Chicago each ye-r. If tliey
were to form the basis for deciding
the Conference championship, howev-
er, they would have to be played at
the end of the football season and we
should have to give up our annual
gamtues with Cornell and Pennsylvania
ec(1 though such intersecll onal con:.
tests were not (xpressly forbidden as
they have been before by that organ-
ization. In other words we should
have to confine our athletic amnbitjclts
to C'oni'erence championships. Myers.

ELEVEN ELEcTED BY WOOLSA(CK
,J HH r Ilonoraryv Society Au non ces
Annll Selectiun,
At the meeting of Woolsack, junior
honorary so'iety, 11 men were elect-
eci, o a. bsis of scholarship. Profes-
sors lDrake, Waite, Knowlton andi
Bunker were mlit' de honorary mombers.
Following are the new men: A. V.
Dubee, '. ., Cooney, A. M. Reed, J.1
?er'hees, K. Mohr, F. J. Kennedy, F. J.
iones, S. W. Marx, W. Mcintyre, R.
Rh a' and M. K. Brown.
l)OGtLA$ PREPARES FORl 1-AlII
"IVI1IT WITH DETROIT S4'IIOOL.
Nothing is being overlokcd by
Coach Douglas in the preparation of
the Mkchigan freshmen for their game
with the University of Detroit eleven
in that city, Saturday. This game
loonis up as the hardest struggle on
the yearling's program, and it is prob-
able that the same combination gill
be used on the line and in the back-
.-e.... -

FORMER RECO

11 1-L IT
REUNION AT BARBOUR GYM
7:30 P. M., FRIDAY NIGHT
Dancing Refreshments Talks

The students directory will be plac-
ed on -sale at the different stands this
afternoon at 4:00 o'clock. This shat-
ters all former records of the publica-
tion, being 26 days earlier than that
of last year, and mare than one month
and a half ahead of the 1911 directory,
A feature of this year's book is the list
of the sororities and fraternities of
the State Normal school at Ypsilanti
The contents include a faculty di-
rectory, a list of telephones by streets
of more than 2,000 houses, where stu-
dents room, the alphabetical lists ol
students at the university, the school
of music and the Michigan State Nor-
mal school, and all the campus organ-
izations.

®,

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