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April 19, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-04-19

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

chigan

Dat

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, FRIDAY, APRIL 19, 1912.

:_
. ;: r . . Y

I)IES

to an
s.
r after-
former
niversi-

ADVOCATES CAMPUS,
DRINKING DEVICES'

MUSICIANS TO GIVE
DETROIT CONCERT

in t
, on

Communicant Deplores Apsense
Suitable Facilities in Unfi
versity Buildings.

Qf

JProgram Will Include Many of
"Hits" on the Trip to the
Pacific Coast.

the

to nephrit-

eer was a member of the Ukni-
.f Michigan faculty from 1889
part of which time he was di-
f the inorganic and physic«l
y laboratories. At the tim
ath, he was serving as dir:ct-
bureau of science at Manila
n of the Philippine Medical
time of Dr. H. W. jWiley's res-
as chief of the fedeal bureau
istry, press reports from
ton named Dr. Freer as a pos-
cessor.
Freer had rmany warm
n this city, and the news of
i came as a sad message toI
Ann Arbor people who knew

I

PPAN HALT HAS NOVEL SYSTEMr A SOCIAL EVENT OF THE SEASON

RECITAL
ES AUDIENCE'

Spealght, of London, England,
ives Impersonations Fro' n
"Pickwick Papers."
S WONDERFUL UKNOWLEDGE

ler, who Readers of Dickens were enabled to
>f Belo- renew their acquaintance with, tl1e
an .1 the ! ..*
able the Pickwickians last evening in a recital
)uble to--
hat the by Frank Speaight,- of London, Eng-
same as land. The audience, which was larger
rimming than the usual S. L. A. crowd, attested
et uue- the popularity of one of the greatest
to try nineteenth century novelists.
ith will Mr. Speaight's impersonations were
. . U. confined to Pickwick and the charac-
ters associated with him in the story
>e: which takes his name. Some of the
most amusing episodes in the book
were depicted, the most entertaining
being reached in the picture of "The
Great Trial of Bardell vs. Pickwick."
In delineating the feminine principals
Mr. Speaight showed remarkable
knowledge of his characters.
The entertainer of last evening
brought with him the peculiar variety
of "cockney" which is native to the
E land of Dickens and he bore all the
~ITTEE. "touches" of the environment in which
his characters lived. This familiarity
ands of with the world of Pickwick and his
e friends lent a refreshing reality to the
recital. ,
The next number on the S. L. A,
aounced course will occur Friday evening,
ias been April 26, when ex-Governor Folk of
ar's ofi- Missouri will speak.
The --*
ors who RAIN PREVENTS TRIAL HEATS,
ity next
ial rea- Final Tryouts for Penn Games to be
rticular Held Saturday.
nts will Weather prevented the time heats
he com- from being run yesterday afternoon on
e Unioi Ferry field, but Dr. Kraenzlein plans
'om the to give several of the aspirants for the
four mile track team which is to be
titution, sent to the Penn games, an opportuni-
nust be ty to do the distance against time this
t before afternoon. The trials for the team
ch falls will be run on Saturday rain or shine
nust be according to Michigan's track trainer..
wing is Several of the track men were out in
un Cox, the rain yesterday for a short work
Inman out, but they did not aim to accom-,
Walter pulish much beyond keeping themselves
in condition.

(The Michigan Rally assumes no re-
Sp()sibiluty for sentiments express-
ecl in CohIJntilnications.)
Editor of The Michigan Daily:-
I trust it may be permitted one
whose first interests are in Ann Arbor,
even though he is not at the moment
a student there, to express through
your columns his opinions on a sub-
ject that should be of immediate con-
cern to the campus at large.
Let me preface what'I have to say
with the- remark that I spent last Sun-
day- and Monday in Ann Arbor. Would
I were gifted with the epic genius of
a Homer! 'Tis near a profanation to
treat in less immortal phrase of the
gentleman whose abilities I should
like to celebrate. I mean the janitor
of Tappan hall. He has achieved the
impossible. He has lifted up Olympus.
He has piled Pelion on Ossa. He has
established a drinking fountain, an un-
assuming but a perfectly acceptable
drinking fountain, in the arid wastes
of Tappan hall. With instruments no
more formidable than a few inches of
rubber tubing and a short piece of
string,'but with an inventive genius
and an energy unrivalled in the history
of the university, he has pointed the
'water supply of Ann Arbor (such as
it is) toward Heaven, an'd the thirsty
may now be refreshed. I salute him.
During the three years that I was in'
Ann Arbor the editorial column of
The Michigan Daily lifted its -voice in
frequent but vain protest against the
absence of suitable drinking facilities
in the campus buildings. The adminis-
trative officers of the university seem-
ed unmoved by the appeal, and one
was almost forced to the conclusion-.
teat they were not dependent on Ann
Arbor's water for the quenching of
their thirst They did set up a foun-'
tain in University hall; but this foun-
tain itself blushed for their niggardli-
ness and durst not, though it would,
flow freely for any length of time. It
was left to the janitor of Tappan hall
to put to shame the brilliance of the'
campus, and to make the name of his
calling (who shall say it is less?)
henceforth a badge of glory. I com-
mend the phychologists to a study of'
his mental processes, and the respon-
sible officials of the university to an
imitation of his most aAmirable'activi-'
ty. Yours respectfully,
ROBERT P. LANE, '12 Lit.
Lansing, Mich., April 2, 1912.
1912-13 RA1)LATE SCHOOL
BULLETIN WILL BE OUT SOONT

For a last farewell tour of'the sea-
son, the university musical clubs will
make a trip to Detroit 'a week from
today, April 26th. A concert has been
arranged for that evening under the
auspices of the University of Michigan
Club of that city. Both the glee and
mandolin clubs will share in the pro-
gram which will include many of the
special numbers so successful on the-
Pacific coast trip.
The concert promises to be one of

SUFFRAWISTS HOLD BIG RALLY,
Mrs. Jenny Hardy Tells .of Women of
New Zealand,
"Women are their sister's keepers"
said Mrs. Jenny Law Hardy, formerly
of New Zealand, at the equal suffrage
rally held in the High School' 1.11
last night.. "During the first ten
years of suffrage in New Zealand many
important acts were passed, among
them the eight hour law for women,
the bill against absentee landlordisn,
old age pensions, and the wage bill.
In 1890 New Zealand was bankrupt,
today it is the richest country per cap-
ita in the world."
Mrs. Mary L. Doe, of Bay City, gave
the history of the Michigan Suffrage
Association and told of their struggle
with the legislature and the voters.
The meeting last night was part of
'a state wide campaign which is to be
launched this spring and. summer to
secure votes for equal suffrage -hen
the question comes to a vote in of
ber. The plans will be discussed a
meeting of the administrative ,d
to be held in Detroit next Tuesday:;

the social events -of the seasoni
troit. Several functions are
planned in connection with the
ahd generous entertainment isa
ed. The concert will be giveni
new Knights of Columbus hall.
Kenneth Westermann andl

in De-
being
affair
assur-
in the
Bruce

id at

Bromley are the soloists. The glee
club quartette, composed of Kenneth
Westermann, Burleigh Jacobs, How-
ard C. Porter and Edward Kemp will
also furnish some' numbers which
proved a feature of the "J" Hop con-
cert. Nor will the "Barber Shop"
quartette, Henry Spring, Kingsley
Gould, Glen Codman and Campbell
Trible, fail to render their poular se-
lections which they brought back with
them from the west.
UNION CANVASS IS A SUCCESS.
Committeemen Secure Many Life Mem-
berships During Vacation.
Judging from incomplete returns of
the canvass which was conducted by
undergraduates during spring vaca'
tion for Michigan Union life member-'
ships, fully ten per cent of the alumni
of the last five classes who were ap.
prOached, took out the memberships.
It has been impossible to tabulate the
results because a large number of the
committeemen have just reported with-
in the last few days.
Practically every town in Michigan
was allotted to students, and a large
number of the other cities of any size
throughout the country were worked.'
Committeemen who have not yet re-
ported are asked to fill out the cards'
that were given them and hand them'
to Homer Heath at the Union on Sat-
urday. The results will be compiled'
and the promises that were given in!
a number of cases will be followed
up later,
RELATIVES OF JUNIOR GIRL
ARE RESCUED BY CARPATHIA
Among those who were fortunate to
escape the disaster of the Titanic,
were Mr. and Mrs. Dickinson Bishop,
the brother and sister-in-law of Mary
Bishop, '13.
Mr. and Mrs. Bishop were first class
passengers on the ill-fated Titanic and
were returning to America from a tour
of the Holy Land. A cablegram, re-
ceived by Miss Bishop, stated that her
relatives were safe aboard the rescue
ship Carpathia, and that they would
arrive in New York this morning.
Fresh Physical Exams Have Begun.
All freshmen must sign up with Dr.-
May for physical examination as soon
as possible. Examinations began yes-
terday and they show great improve-
ment in the muscular development 61
those examined.

9

'AN ILLINOIS TEAR
MAY PLAY HEI
Players Declared Ineligible by Cc
ence Ask for Game With
Michigan.
MINOR DIFFICULTIES IN THE

I at

OLD LOCATIOT
RY IS OBJEC
SORS AND S
WEST SEMD

WAY

There is a big possibility that a I objectin
University of Illinois baseball team other sI
It is de
will appear on Ferry field this spring, where '
But wait, it won't be the regular team the tram
of that institution, bqt even a better The ;
one, composed of players whom the which h
conference authorities have seen fit the pasi
to paste the ineligible tag on. The mat- are stre
ter is not at all certain but if a few legal lig
minor difficulties can' be arranged it ing the
should be scheduled. building
The Ineligibles, as the team is call- tory, as
ed, comprises some of the star players too clos
of Illinois, but for some reason or oth- fort. N(
er they have been tabooed by the con- has yet
ference. A challenge was received at enough
the athletic offices yesterday asking for At the
a game with Michigan. Although of finger,

wl U

course no definite action could be tak-
en, Director Bartelme answered the
challenge and inquired the various
causes of ineligibility and whether the
team was playing with the consent of
the faculty. If the men are ineligible
under the Michigan rules, they
cannot of course be played,
or if they have not the .per-
mission of the faculty, courtesy de-
mands that Michigan should not com-
pete with them. But if these two ob-
jections are out of the way, there is
nothing to prevent a game.
Until a reply is received to the in-
quiries, the matter will hang fire, bit
it is sincerely to be hoped that the
match can be arranged. Certainly it
would arouse a great deal of interest
besides being a good game.

to co:
at its
that a
dent x
concei

M

and the members
are willing to pla:
bad to break up a
occasion to conside
and seems to afforc
to the student body

The new Graduate school bulletin
for the year 1912-13 will be out the
first part of next week.,N
It contains a list of 93 universities
and colleges from which students on
the graduate roll have taken degrees.
During 1910- 11 there were only 86
schools thus represented. Wasedo and
Tokio Universities of Japan, -are
among the latter contributors" to the
roll of Michigan graduate students.
Pro1. 11. Ut. Cross is Out of Town.
Prof. H. R. Cross will be unable to
meet any of his classes today. Prof.
Cross has been called out of town or,
account of his work in ' connection
with the university extension lectures.

A

SENIOR LAWS WILL PLAN
LANSING EXCURSION TODAY
The senior laws will hold an impor-
tant class meeting this afternoon in
room B of the law building. Plans
will be made for the journey to Lan-
sing to be admitted to practice before
the Supreme court of'the state. Pres.
R. 0. Bonisteel, who was injured in the
interurban wreck and at present is at
his home in Jackson, will be unable to
be present, and vice-president J. D.
Thomas will preside.

i
''';1
°
'
y
3
.a

President Hutchins w
for Battle Creek, wh-r" .
the alurmni oe "
banquet this
Chicago Saturday,:.
quet at the Univer:'
alumni of that city.
The alumni of Qa a
scheduled to hold theiri
and organization at
Tuesday,'and the presi
promised to be present a
He will aid in the work
and will deliver an ac
banquet which will be h

ay

Season Base Ball .Books admitting to following 50c games
will be sold to members of the association

"I"MN SCIHLDVLN

for

$150

Admission 25c

Alma Wed., Apr. 17' 25c
0. S. U. Sat., Apr. 20 50c
Western R. Sat. Apr. 27 50c
Syracuse Thu. fay 9 50c
Wabash Wed. Fay 1550c
M.A.C. Sat. May 18 50c
Alumni date later 50c
Pennsylvania Wed. June 26

Case Fri., Apr. 19 25c
Ky. State Wed. Apr. 24
Ohio Wesleyan Thu. M.
Syracuse Sat. May 115
West Vir. Fri. May 17
M.A.C. Thu. May 30 50
Pennsylvania Sat. Jun
6

SRIL 20

Kentucky State Wed. Apr. 24
Western Reserve Sat. Apr. 27
Ohio Wesleyan Thu. May 2.

Syracuse Thur..May 9
Wabash Wed. flay 15
M. A. C. Sat. May 18

ill

Alumni vs Varsity date to be announced later

Dy ..

.

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