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October 15, 1911 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1911-10-15

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Michigan

Daily

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1#

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, OCTOBER 15, 1911.

No. 11.

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IL_

TACK

IS

As The Coaches Look at it.
Coach Yost. "I Can't say that I
am tickled but am pleased
Wgith the general result. I think
that the score fairly represents
the relative ability of the two
teams. The line was fair. May-
be is was because we were up
against a better team than we an-
ticipated that the line did not come
up to what we expected it would.
Craig isa half backfrom now on
I thought in the first half that I
would need to look for another
full back but I have changed my
mind."
Coach Macklin. "Our men did
all that I expected them to. I
am satisfied. They could not stand
up against the heavier team and
that is the reason we lost"
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CLASS MANAGERS MEET TODAY.
Second Opportunity Given Those Un-
able to Attend Friday.
All class football managers are ex-
pected to report at the Union at 3:00
o'clock this afternoon to hear the

Decisively in
rter, Coming
Vith an Over-

TELLS TALE.
ately but Weight,
Skill Tip
aneN*-
ichigan Daily).
Oct. 14.--Sixty
thrilling football
ichigan ever wit-
ate yesterday af-
iversity of Mich-
Farmer institu-
t defeat M. A. C.
home grounds in
nto the late min-
arter without the
and 3 points be-
braced, and in

WILL SPEAK BEFORE FRESHMEN.
Dr. A. S. Warthin Will Give First
Lecture Tomorrow.
Dr. Aldred S. Warthin's first lecture
for men will be given tomorrow even-
ing. The popularity of these lectures
is demonstrated by the rapidity with
which the tickets have been taken up.
"We are much pleased with the pros-
pects for the lectures," said Mr. W. H.
Tinker of the Students' Christian As-
sociation, when seen last evening. "All
of the tickets for the Monday night
talk have been taken and the remain-'
ing are going at a lively rate. Those
first year men desiring tickets should
call at the association office at once."
LAWS' ELECTION SYSTEM

rules governing participation in class
games. This will be the last meeting
of its kind before the opening of the
series and all managers will be held
responsible for the instructions given
out. 'Any manager failing to attend
the meeting will have his team debar-
red, if a mistake is made as a result of
the manager's absence.
The name of every eligible player
must be in the hands of Interclass
Manager Toulme, or at the athletic
association office, by Wednesday. To
be eligible, a player must secure a
faculty certification and be examined
by Dr. May.
FRESHMEN LOSE TO
OHIO AGG REGATION
M Ot Union Captain Runs 8
Yards for Touchdown as
Drop Kick is Blocked

RAISE $2,000 PAST TWO WEEKS.
Detroit Men Subscribe Toward Resi-
dential Hall Fund.
President Harry B. Hutchins was in
Detroit yesterday to confer with Miss
Agnes Parks who is conducting the
campaign for funds for residential
halls. Two thousand dollars have been
subscribed in the last two weeks,
$1,504 of which was collected yester-
day. J. L. Hudson of Detroit subscrib-
ed $1,000, while Lem Bowen of the
same city gave $500.
In order to better acquaint the Mich-
igan alumnae in Detroit with the pro-
ject the Women's League will give a tea
to-morrow at the college club of De-
troit, to which all members of the
league and Michigan alumnae are in-
vited.
SENATE REGULATES
VARSITY WARBLERS
Musical Club Aspirants 'Must.
Now Get Eligibility Cards
From Faculty

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YESTERDAYS RESULTS
(By Detroit News Service.)
EAST
Pennsylvania 22, Villa Nova,o
Penn State 5, Cornell o.
Syracuse 6, Rochester 5.
Yale 33, Virg'a Poly-Tech o.
Harvard 18, Williams o.
Princeton 31, Colgate o.
WEST
0. S. U. o, West. Res. o.
Case o, Dennison o.
Chicago ii, Purdue 3.
Nebraska 59, Kan. Aggies o.
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Music Lovers Will be Gi
Opportunity to Hear t
mows Prima Donna it
versity Hall Oct. 20,
RANKS WITH SCHUMANN.

MADAME 0

FIRST DEFEAT IN THREE YEARS.]I TINERARY OF TRIP UNDECIDED.

UNIGN SEI

to their FINDS FAVOR ON CAMPUS.
Sentiment on the campus is decid-
vere the edly in favor of the method of electing
of Mich- class presidents proposed at the sen-
alumni,ior law meeting Friday. By this sys-
e middle tem, if any candidate_ fails to obtain a
ained at majority of the votes cast, the two
heir op- highest in the count shall be voted up-
thrown on at another election.
er, when "I think that it is something that is
an's 35- needed very badly," said "Hap" Has-
long the kins yesterday.N "It would prevent a
not that great deal of unnecessary trouble in,
e would class elections, and I see no reason
'onklin why, if carried out right, it should not
was fol- be adopted."
olverine "A fairer chance is given to all con-
enied. cerned and I am most heartily in fa-
Ld Craig vor of it," is the way Harry Stein-
un most hauser thinks. "It should be incor-'
work in porated in all class constitutions."
)eing of "The efficiency of class elections
for the would be greatly increased by the pro-
cutes of posed plan," declared "Mat" Blish last
cMillan night. "I think, however, that it would;
d Craig work better in the upper classes, as
he kick- there are not many candidates in the'
the ball lower classes."

OPENS

ectacular colum
the backfieldv
>f the game, b
Wells went over
in a few mu
st quarter. M
a at quarter an
left half. On tb
L'homson tookt
middle of thef
following this
i dash between
3n the next dow
her touch-down.
the goals. TI
throughout, c
;th of the op]
not present i
Les to mar the
duel between.
honors about ev

For the first time since the reorgan-
ization of the All-Fresh team three
seasons ago, the Michigan youngsters
met defeat yesterday afternoon. Mt.
Union college gave the first year men
a 6 to 0 beating due more to the in-
experience of the freshmen than 'to
anything else.
The touchdown which made
possible the six points of the Al-
liance eleven came in the third quar-
ter of the- game. Collette was called
back to try for a drop kick from the
30 yard line. The freshmen forwards
did not hold and the kick was blocked,
enabling Captain Monuer to recover
the ball and race down a clear field
for an 80 yard run to a touchdown.
Had it not been for this ill fortune, the
game might have resulted in the 0 to 0
tie, for the Ohio team had no other
favorable opportunity to score.
The All-Fresh had a number of
chances to make points but could not
negotiate the necessary scores. Time
after time the Michigan backs tore off
good gains in mid-field, only to fail
when it came to the crucial test. In
the first period Collette had an excel-
lent chance for a drop kick from the
30 yard line, but his boot went wild.
At the beginning of the second quar-
ter the ball was put in play in Mich-
igan's possession on the 6 yard line,
but the freshmen were held and lost
the leather. Again in the third quar-
ter Michigan had the ball on Mt. Un-
ion's 25 yard line. Kellar called for
a forward pass from a place kick for-
mation, but the ball went over to Mt.
Union.
Collette at left half and Kellar at
quarter played star games for the
freshmen and furnished the 'only spec-
tacular work of the afternoon. They
were hampered by ifiediocre interfer-
ence and only' fair work on the part
of the forwards, however, and their
efforts amounted to nothing in the
score-getting line.
Coach Cole lays the defeat to the
failure of the linemen to perform
their functions properly and has called
practice for Monday afternoon to cor-
(Continued on page 4.)

.Glee Club Tryouts Come Wednesday.
Resolutions to the effect that the
Musical clubs will hereafter be sub-
jected to the same regulations in re-
gard to eligibility as the dramatic or-
ganizations have been adopted by the
University Senate.. A card showing
that the *student is in good standing
must first be obtained from Professor
A. A. Stanley or Professor A. G. Hall
of the Senate Committee on Musical
Organizations; these must be filled out
and signed by the secretary of the
department, then returned to Profes-
sor Hall.
The following students are ineli-
gible:
Students on the probation or warn-
ed lists; also those having outstand-
ing conditions or not-passes unless
they bring written permits from the
dean of the department.
In the literary, engineering and law
departments; first year students.
In the literary department; special
students.
Students should present the eligi-
bility slips at the tryouts; if they
are unable to do this they may tryout
with the understanding that the slip
must be presented at the first rehears-
al. Tryouts for the glee club will be
held Wednesday evening of this week
at seven o'clock in the School for Mu-
sic.
Burk Mann, elected general manager
of the musical clubs last year is not
in college this year, and the plans for
this year's trip are, as a result, some-
what uncertain. A trip to 'the South,
with Nashville and Louisville as the
objective points, and a Western trip
are possibilities. W. H. Stewart, '13
L, assistant general manager, will
have charge of the arrangements in
the absence of Mr. Mann.
Scrub Gets Bad Jolt in the Eye.
"Spence" Scott, right end for the

MUST MUZZLE DOGS AND
PROCURE YEARLY LICENSE
"Brutus," the English bull dog so-
journing at the Alpha Sigma frater-
nity house, wandered away Thursday
evening without wearing a license tag.
The Ann Arbor police department did
the rest. A. R. Crebbin, '12 homeop
and owner of the pup, was called be-
fore Chief Apfel and made to pay a
small fine beside taking out a regula-
tion license for the classic-cognomen-
ed Brutus.
The ordinance under which Crebbin
was arraigned is a recent action of
the city council. It provides that all
dogs shall be licensed and that bull
dogs shall wear a muzzle when at
large. A public pound is provided
for, and captured beasts of the cat-
chasing variety are to be quickly dis-
patched if not reclaimed.
"We are determined to stop the nui-
sance of frequent dog fights on the
streets, "said Chief Apfel. "The only
way to accomplish this is to enforce
the dog ordinance stringently, and
this we intend to do."
The city clerk's records show that
only five dog licenses have been is-
sued since school resumed. This means
that the majority of dogs owned by
students are unlicensed and liable to
seizure at any time.
FORMER ALUMNUS EDITOR
RETURNS TO OLD HAUNTS.
Arthur J. Abbott, '09, '11 L, has
been in the city since the opening of
school, engaged in editing the October
issue of the Michigan Alumnus, in the
absence of Editor W. B. Shaw, who is
abroad. "Art" will locate in New
York City for the practice of law after
November first, and will be associated
with the firm of Parker, Davis, Wag-
ner and Walton, Mutual Life Building.
The November and Decenber issues
of the Alumnus will be edited by Mr.
Frank G. Tomkins, of the rhetoric
faculty. Harold B. Abbott, junior lit.,
is in charge of the business depart-
ment of the magazine for this year.
Will Choose Councilmen Tomorrow.
Student Council elections will be
held in the various classes tomorrow.
The Senior and Junior Lits will elect
at four in Tappan hall; the Senior
Engineers at four in room 311; the
Senior Laws at four in room B; the
Junior Laws at two in room C; the
Seniors at ten in room B, and the
Junior Medics at one in the West Lec-
ture Room of the Medical Building.
Reck is Senior Law Candidate.
B. H. Reck was nominated to the
presidency of the senior law class and
not C. E. Lewis whose name was run
in the list of candidates published in
Saturday's Daily.

field for
with a
i tackle
xn went
Conk-
'he line
onsider-
position.
n large
contest,
Hill and
ven, was

Her Advent Marks the Greatest
cal Event of the First
Semester.
"Gadski, October 20th." It is a
assuming announcement, but to
who have had the pleasure of1
ing to the prima donna either c
concert or operatic stage, it sig
much. Her appearance- in Univ
Hall next Friday evening marl
opening of the Choral Union
of concerts.

al in the extreme.
g the toss, Capt. Stone, of the
hose to defend the north
1 kicked off to Michigan at
.n early fumble lost the
he Wolverines, and Hill es-
lield goal from the 35-yard
itius deflected the ball and
pt failed. Michigan, then
n the field in straight gains,
Liling at a field goal from the
ine. A recovered fumble
Wolverines the ball on M. A.
ontinued on Page 4.)

Coppers at Peace With Students.
Police Apfel thinks that students
are becoming more saintly every year.:
"We haven't been called upon to in-
terfere in any disturbance so far this
semester," said the chief yesterday. "In
the olden days school was not resum-
ed with such a small amount of hilar-
ity."
Daily Subscription List Increases.
The subscription list of the "Daily"
is now larger than ever before, and is
still increasing at the rate of about
25 to 50 a day. A house to house can-
vass will be conducted by members of
the business staff in the evenings and
any one whom the aforesaid members
fail to see, may mail his subscription
to the "Daily," stating name and ad-
dress to which he wishes the paper
mailed. Payment does not necessarily'
have to be made immediately, although
after December 15, the subscription
price will be 54c more.

Three years ago, Schumann-H
.gave the initial recital of the sea
two years ago a similar task fe
Sambrich. The coming of Gadski
year brings up an intersesting
that inside of three years Ann A
audiences have listened to the
artists who, more than any of
have raised the standard of co
programs in the west and middle
DISTURBANCES IN ORIENT
EXCITE CHINESE STUDI
Chinese students in the univE
are vitally interested in the re
tionary activities taking place it
mother country. An overthrow
the present Manchurian dynasty r
probably result in the immediat
call of the 181 indemnity studen
this country.
"I do not think that any Chines<
dents in America will return to
part in the impending revolu'
said W. P. Chen, one of the local
golian students, when seen yeste
"A great many of the indemnity s
ars are sons of high Chinese offi
but their return would not mate
effect the movement."
It is known to be a fact that
of the Chinese students in the I
States are in hearty sympathy
the revolution against the establ
Manchurian government. How
the pupils supported by the index
are afraid to express their convic
as detectives of the Manchus kee
perial students under close su
lance.

reserves, has one eye bandaged
result of Thursday's practice.
eyelid was cut so seriously that

as a
The
eight

stitches

had to be taken.

U

VIVERSITY
. M. C. A.,

REV. CLEMENT G. CLARKE
O Minneapolis,'willdisc.uss."The Present Day
Yalu of the .Christian R .igen
To ahe University Trained Man"

6:30
TONIGHT

Nowbervy madl.

All Men Welconie

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