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February 14, 1912 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1912-02-14

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e

Michigan

I

i

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 1912.

ing given to general revision of re-
quirements, the present was held to be
a convenient time to take up this other
matter.
Another "special order" is to be pre-
sented at the faculty meeting tonight,
from the administrative board of the
Graduate School. It proposes the
adoption of a resolution that members
of the various departments of the Uni-
versity, of Senate rank, be discour-
aged from presenting themselves for
higher degrees at this University.
CHORAL UNION WILL HEAR
WORLD FAMOUS PIANIST.

CHINESE STUDENT IS OFFENDED**I THEY'RE HIGH, BUT WE WANT 'EM

COMEDY CLUI
AWARDED

DI

Unkind Expression in German Gram-
mar Causes a Protest.
(The Daily assumes no responsibility
for sentiments expressed in com-
muications.)
Editor, The Michigan Daily:-
"Pig-tailed Chinese opium" is the
unkind expression used by Paul V.
Bacon in his German grammar which
was recommended by the University
as a text-book for the engineering de-
partment. The expression and there-
fore the course, insults the poor Chin-
ese students. The protestant and all
the Chinese students in the class felt
greatly insulted therefore may we
humbly appeal to the faculty members
that the course is doing injustice to
the Chinese students and also to the
University of Michigan which is well
known for the hospitality shown to
us? ,
A CHINESE STUDENT.

Freshman Club Will Abbreviate Trous-
ers and Eat a Simplified Banquet
(The Daily assumes no responsibility
for sentiments expressed in com-
muitiications.)
Editor,- The Michigan Daily:-
In view of the Daily's proposed
adoption of simplified spelling this
seems to be the proper time to call
attention to an organization recently
formed in the Freshman class under,
the name of the Simplified Trousers
Board. The members in joining pledge
themselves to cut three inches from
the bottom of each trousers' leg.. The
proceeds from the sale of the cloth
thus saved are put into a commonR
fund, which is to be devoted at the
end of the year to a simplified ban-
quet. Mr. Andrew Carnegie, it is said,
has given his enthusiastic support to
the idea and will present each member
with a Scottish kilt. E. B. G.
PRESS TO FEATURE
UNIVERSITY NEWS'

Lhevinne Scheduled to Appear on
Course Program Next Fri-
day Evening.

the

Josef Lhevinne, the great Russian
of the Ad- Pianist, who is hailed all over the
osition of world as a second Rubenstein, will
give the annual piano recital on the
-y depart- Choral Union course, next Friday ev-
to be sub- ening. His career was much like Mo-
y meeting zart's. At the age of eight he was a
bes four public soloist, three years later enter-
grade not ing the Moscow Conservatory. At
and a fourteen, Rubenstein was so impress-
d on the ed by his playing that he asked the
his latter boy to appear at one of his concerts,
rever, will and the young virtuoso did so splen-
e Regents didly, that he was publicly embraced
tion. by the great pianist.
ning with From the time that he first appear-
er reports ed at Berlin, in 1895 his has been an
with the unbroken chain of successes. At that
A, excel- time, in competition with twenty oth-
rely pass- ers, he won the Rubenstein Prize, the
iplete; X, highest honor obtainable by European
hs admits pianists. Although this is Lhevinne's
rule will fifth tour of America, it is his first ap-
they are pearance in Ann Arbor.
nsatisfac- The program is of rare interest and
' exam is value. Opening with the Beethoven
i the stu- sonato op. 101, smaller pieces by Mo-
eration of zart, Mendlssohn and Schumann, fol-
in prepa- low until the large collection of short
pieces grouped under the title "Car-
a little of naval," and composed by Schumann,
in order opens the second part. Three selec-
vork must tions from Chopin, and the "Blue Dan-
er, and he ube," by Schultz-Evler, complete. the.
within a program.
igins. The -
s the stu- SCHEDULE FOR BASKET BALL
y excuse PRACTICE HAS BEEN ALTERED

xcuse Because of conflict with evening
later, gym classes, the schedule for basket-
ball practice has been altered, The
ng is '13 and '12 dents, who were due to
udent work on Monday and Wednesday
at his nights at 8 and 8:15 respectively, will
rwise. have the floor on Tuesday and Wed-
>rder" nesday nights at 8:30 and 8:45. The
ggests '13 and '12 laws, instead of Thursday
ward- at 8 and 8:15, will work on Wednes-
which day night at the same time. Manager
.h 135 Anderson has ruled that, in order to
n, in use the floor for practice, each team
hour must have five men present at the
dopts time practice is scheduled to begin.

rd sug
11 be a
points
f whicl
aduatio
credit
:ulty a
1 have
beforei

DAILY WILL TAKEI~
A STRAW BALLOT
Campus Choice for President
Is To be Determined
In This Manner
SIGNATURE MUST BE ON BALLOTS
In view of the political mutterings
that are coming from all parts of the
country, the Michigan Daily has de-
cided to try to find the choice of the
student body for a national president
by means of a straw vote.
This vote will be open to all readers
of the Daily and the first ballot will
be published in the issue of Saturday,
February 17. The ballots will provide
three candidates on the Democratic
and Republican tickets, and a fourth
place will be left blank under each of
the party heads, so that any may write
a candidate if he does not happen
to be one of the Daily's choices.
Ballot boxes will be placed in the
engineering and law buildings and in
the General Library. The votes may
be placed in these, or else given to
any member of the Daily staff. It is
planned to publish the ballots in three
issues of the paper that everyone may
have the opportunity of casting a vote.
Both nen and women may cast the
ballots. The Daily contest bars no
one, but it is requested that but one
ballot be cast by each person. To fa-
cilitate this, a place will be left upon
each ballot for signing the voter's
name, and no ballot will be counted,
that has no signature.
Returns of the straw vote will be
published from day to day in the col-
umns of the Daily. The date of the
closing of the balloting will be an-
nounced later.
PROF. TRUEBLOOD RETURNS
FROM HIS SOUTHERN TOUR
Professor T. C. Trueblood has re-
turned from a tour through the south-
ern part of the United States, and to
Havana, which he took during the last
two weeks. While on the trip, Prof.
Trueblood gave numerous recitals and
readings. At Havana, he met Mrs.
Trueblood who is spending the winter
in the Cuban metropolis.
Dean Cooley to Return Today.
Dean Mortimer E. Cooley will be
back from Cleveland some time today.
He has been absent for two weeks.
SENIOR LITS WILL HOLD
.A ST. VALENTINES DANCE.
A "St. Valentines Con-Clave," is the
title of the senor lit party to be held
in Barbour gynnasium, Saturday af-
ternoon. Special favors of the valen-
tine variety, to soothe the hearts brok-
en by "cons," will be given. "Ike"
Fischer will furnish the music, and
promises many novelties for the danc-
ing, which will last from 2 to 5:30.

Awards of the Comedy Club insignia,
including the gold bar watch fob for
three years' activity, the silver fob
for two years' service, and the gold
stick pin for one year, were given out
by the management yesterday, and
the following are to be the recipients
when Wright, Kay and Co., of Detroit
have filled the order. Gold bar watch
fobs will be presented to Miss Lucile
G. Stowe, Dion S. Birney and Donald
S. Kiskadden; silver fobs will be given
to Miss Mary Palmer, Messrs. Arthur
G. Cohen, David, Cohn, Karl B. Mat-
thews, and Clay Wilber; stick pins -
will be given to Miss Mary True,
and Messrs. C. B. Mitchell, William W.
Campbell, Henry B. Schuerman, Car-
lisle Ferguson, John H. Syverson, Lo-
ren Robinson, Harold Kingsley and
William T. Daugherty.
DR. HUS ENTERTAINS CERCLE.,t
Mid-Year "Soiree Dansante" to be
Given February 29.
Describing personal experiences as r
well as the natural beauties of the b
West Indian island of Hayti, Dr. Henri t
Hus delivered an illustrated address, a
in French, before the Cercle Francais I
yesterday afternoon. With an intimate t
knowledge of the primitive ways of the h
dark skinned natives, and a well t
rounded ,acquaintance with the tropi-
cal flora and fauna of the southern i
island, Dr. Hus figured as a favorite M
with the audience that listened to his n
talk. a
. ."Pierre Loti" will be the subject of o
the hitherto unnamed address that M. t
Talamon will give under the auspices w
of the Cercle Francais next week. The c
succeeding number on the annual pro- q
gram will be the mid year "Soiree ri
dansante" to be given February 29 in u
Barbour gym. This function will be p
given with an idea of gathering to-
gether socially all active and associ-
ate members of the Cercle, together o
with the faculty members of the t
French department. Ike Fischer will s
be the entertainer of the evening-the i
rest will dance..

Supplement of Detroit News-
Tribune to Describe
Local Affairs
MANY SUBJECTS TO BE TREATED.
Special illustrated articles dealing'
with various phases of University of
Michigan life will be published shortly
in the Sunday magazine of the Detroit
News-Tribune. The articles were fur-
nished to the metropolitan paper by
Prof. J.R. Brummuniversity news edi-
tor, and it is thought that they will
serve to convey a more correct inter-
pretation of university affairs than
could be given by an outside writer.
Among the subjects to be treated in
the Detroit paper are physical training
for women, college dramatics, the uni-
versity library, and experimentation
by Dr. J. F. Shepherd. The local news
bureau-has been assured that the Sun-
day magazine will hereafter feature
university news matter as much as
possible in its columns,
MR. BEAHAN TO LECTURE
ON RAILROAD PROBLEMS.
Mr. Willard Beahan, assistant engi-
neer for the Lake Shore and Michigan
Southern R. R., will lecture this week
to the, men in course 27 on "Railway
Engineering Problems," as follows:'
Wednesday, 4 p. in., Thursday, 8 a. m
and 4 p. in., Friday, 4 p. m.
These lectures will all be held in
Room 102, economics building. It is in-
tended tol make the lectures relate to
railway location problems primarily.

0f

houlb
s qui
when

to be
it be-

orted, with the
shall be valued
points; B, two
,no points; E,
All advanced
. as of grade C.
effect most stu-
as for all who
16 the require-
points. All
to be reckoned
>r every hour.

heir
An

ager Sha
one of tl
hat they
with the
could not
quite. dui
umored
up to the
publicatic

Summer Camp's Books Straightened.
Reports from the auditing commit-
tee of the 1911 summer camps of engi-
neering and biological departments
show that the accounts have all been
checked over and found correct. It
cost just $2,400 to run the commissary
department of the camps.,
URGES PARTICIPATION IN
ALL CLASS ACTIVITIES.
"College activities are an important
part of your education," declared Wil-
lard Beahan, assistant chief engineer
of the Lake Shore and Michigan South-
ern railroad, at the junior engineer
dinner last night. "Your friends, your
classmates especially, will be your
most valuable asset in your profes-
sional life."
A. R. Bailey and "Colly" Colamore
also responded to toasts with "Jinks"
Otto as toastmaster. The class will
hold its next dinner Tuesday, March
9.

PRESIDENT HUTCHINS AND DR.
ANGELL TO SPEAK IN DETROIT,
President Hutchins will go to De-
troit tomorrow afternoon to speak be-
fore the Twentieth Century Club of
that city. Friday evening he will be
in Owosso, in order to preside at the
organization of the Michigan alumni of
that district.
Both the president and Dr. Angell
will probably make addresses at a
luncheon of former University women
to be held at the Pontchartrain, De-
troit, Saturday noon. The luncheon is'
in the nature of a reunion of all the
women who have attended the univer-
sity. Representatives from all the,
sorority and league houses, and a
number of faculty women expect to go
in for the luncheon. Miss Edna Thun-
er, president of the Women's League
will also be among the speakers.
Prof. Davis Expected Soon.
Mr. C. 0. Davis, Assistant Professor
of Education, who has been engaged
in expert examination of the New York
City high schools for the past seven
weeks, will return Friday or Saturday.
ORGANIZATION REPORTS
ARE NOT YET ALL IN.
-0-
Of the blank cards which were sent
out before examinations from the office
of the Non-Athletic Board, asking for
the names of all the organizations to

concerned, the rule w
"We mean to stick
he said. "Of course
final authority, but the
up and we do not mea
are sorry that the c
to pay their accounts
tified twice of the fir
left the matter in the
step was necessary in
accounts in on time.
tended to keep any
of the book, and- the
few did not pay is
result of the adoptior
ure. The law classes
ones who have not se
ers are in the same
Thinks Matter Can
President Bonistee
laws was not inclined
ter seriously. He sta
collection of class du
essary to raise the
'money for the Michi
and that there was ni
treasury to settle the
ruary 1.
"I can't see how we
of the book," he said.
the money, and hav
could we pay it?"
"Will your class a
a dispensation of the
"I can't say as to I
has not been discuss
Doesn't Affect Se

t proceed-
'iew to in-
m into the
committee
,xson, now
i to inves-
in, Taylor,
were writ-
s and uni-
ch showed

)ack to the Mine, the Strike's Over!
As far as the university is concern-
ed, the recent strike of the firemen
employed in the power plant is over.
When their demands for higher wages
and a vacation were not granted, 18
of the 22 employees walked out. The
efficiency of the plant was temporarily
impaired, but new men were soon se-
cured and at present the full force
is at work.
Prof. Bird Now Studies at Madrid.
Prof. James Bird who is in Europe on
a year's leave of absence has left Paris
for Madrid where he will continue his
studying.
MICHIGAN TO BE REPRESENTED
AT EDUCATIONAL CONVENTION.
The University of Michigan will be
represented at a meeting of the Na-
tional Association of College Teach-
ers of Education, to be held at St.
Louis, Mo., the last week in February,
by Professor Allen Whitney, Dr. G.
L. Jackson, Dr. C. S. Berry and Dr.
Reed. These men will leave here Feb-
ruary 25.

d the I

which each student belonged, a large h
number have already been turned in, c
with the required information. The r
returns so far are reported as satis- t
factory, and it is expected that now a
that exams are over another large c
batch will be mailed to the office. a
s
Prof. Myers Goes to Cleveland. . r
Prof. Dean W. Myers, of the homeo- c
pathic faculty,left yesterday afternoon c
for Cleveland on a business trip. He p
exnets to retnn to Ann Arbor Thun- e

a
I. 4

Co- Junior Play to be Selected Soon-.
t no Five manuscripts have been handed
cer- in for the junior girls' play. The
ass- judges, Dean M. B. Jordan, Professor
port T. E. Rankin and Mr. H. A. Kenyon,
wing will probably give their decision with-
be- in the next day or two.

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