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July 14, 2003 - Image 1

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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2003-07-14

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One hundred twelve years ofeditorialfreedom

1 Summer Weekly
wwwmichigandaily.com

Monday
July 14, 2003

f I _ - ..r r ..

NEWS I

book vendor, a
longtime fixture
on State Street.

Page 3
OP/ED
Columnist John
Honkala examines
Detroit's
population
decrease and
explores what
ails U.S. cities.
Page 15
ARTS
Eminem came
home to Detroit
for his only two
North American
concerts of
2003 and Daily
Arts was there.
Page 9
SPORTS

Coleman creates task force to
examize purchasingpolicies'
By AbdurRahman Pasha engaged with our task and has good intentions
Daily Staff Reporter about it. I'm confident that we can produce a
workable Ethical Purchasing Policy that
Dissatisfaction with University pur- everybody can be proud of," Meadows said.
chasing policies has led President Mary "We'll know whether we've done enough
Sue Coleman to take action. after we've produced a draft policy and put it
Coleman recently formed the Task into action. In my opinion, we will have not
Force on Purchasing Ethics and Policies. done enough until our purchasing decisions
In a written statement she instructed the do not produce oppresive conditions for
task force to review current purchasing workers, the environment and people in gen-
policies and report back whether or not eral," Meadows added.
they are consistent with the University's In addition to its meetings with SOLE, the
core values and principles. task force also solicited the opinions of all
Task force membership includes three other interested persons or organizations
professors, four University staff members, during a public forum on July 10.
and two students. "We felt it made sense to get the views of
The task force has been working close- a wide range of interested parties before
ly with Students Organizing for Labor developing our own positions," said Profes-
and Economic Equality, a group dedicat- sor emeritus of the Law School and Task
ed to social justice issues. Force Chair Theodore St. Antoine.
SOLE member Michael Meadow said he "In light of this, there is nothing I can
feels optimistic about the task force. say at this time about our likely direc-
"We have met four times and my initial tion," St. Antoine added.
impressions are very positive. I feel like The attendees offered their opinions and
(almost) everyone on the task force feels See TASK FORCE, Page 8
Hunk of burnin' love Research
led b 'U'
seeks new

Department of Public Safety forcibly escort BAMN organizer Agnes Aleobua off the Diagfor
not cooperating with officials at a speech by University of Califomia Regent Ward Connerly.
Connerly address
draws opposi tion

By Soojung Chafgt
DailyNewsEditor
Because of the efforts of American
Civil Rights Coalition Chairman Ward
Connerly, the voters of the state of Michi-
gan - not the U.S. Supreme Court -
will decide whether
or not the University
can use race-con-
scious admissions in
the future.
"I am pleased to
join others to
announce that we the
people hereby assem-
bled will begina cam-
paign to place on the
November 2004 bal- Conneriy
lot what will be commonly known as the
Michigan Civil Rights Act," Connerly said
during an event in the Diag on Tuesday

hosted byThe Michigan Review.
The act, if passed, would place an
amendment on the Michigan Constitu-
tion to outlaw the use of race as a factor
in hiring and college admissions. In order
to put the issue on the ballot, the initia-
tive's supporters have to gather signatures
from 10 percent of state voters who voted
in the last gubernatorial election.
Connerly is a University of California,
Berkeley regent who led successful ballot
initiatives that ended the use of affirmative
action in California and the state of Wash-
ington. His announcement came only a
few weeks after the Court's landmark deci-
sion in the University's admissions law-
suits. Because the decision does not
mandate the use of race-conscious admis-
sions, but merely says it can be used, a suc-
cessful initiative would bypass the rulings.
On campus, supporters of affirmative
See CONNERLY, Page 8

gan oaSKKai
superstar Chris
Webber faces
reduced charges
aftera hearing
last week.
Page 11
ONLINE
Check out our
website for
breaking cover-
age of national,
local, and cam-
pus events.
CONTACTS
NEWS: 76-DAILY
CLASSIFIED:
764-0557

The Art Fair 2003
The Original Ann Arbor Street Art
Fair, the Ann Arbor Summer Art Fair,
the State Street Area Art Fair, and
the Ann Arbor's South University Art
Fair.
Dates and times: July 16-19,
2003, W-F, 10:00 a.m. - 9:00 p.m.;
Sat, 10:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Locations: Burton Carillon Tower
on North University Avenue, Thayer
Street and East Washington. Street;
South University Avenue; State
Street; State Street from South Uni-
versity to William Street, Main
Street from William to Huron
Avenue, and on Liberty Street from
Ashley to Fifth Avenue.

A2 art fair to

By Lucy Head
For the Daily
"I was born and raised in Ann
Arbor so as a high school student
I worked at several art fairs," said
Shary Brown, executive director
of the Ann Arbor Street Art Fair.
"(Being the director) just seemed
like an interesting job and I
seemed to have a number of
skills that, when you put them all
together, they just seemed to
work out," Brown said.
The Ann Arbor art fair is a 44
year-old tradition that takes place
on the downtown streets of Ann

Arbor. This y
1,185 juried a
pate in the fair
four separate.
coinciding tin
close proximity
Brown, who
her fifteenth fa
said she sees h
to continually i
ty and experien
"The trick
fundamentall
keep improvin
Brown said."
new things at
year than there

Michael Osterberger poses for photos while Gene
Dinapoi sings in the background during Michigan
ElvisFest at Riverside Park In Ypsilanti on Friday.
take over city
ear approximately The program that Brown
rtists will partici- said she is most proud of is the
which consists of Emerging Artist Program,
art fairs, all with which works with the School
nes and within a of Art and Design to showcase
to one another. three students' art in their own
will participate in booth at the fair.
ir this Wednesday, "(This program) has been a
er position of one part of the fair on and off since
mprove the quali- the start. It's a connection
ce of the art fair between the audience and the
here is to keep artists, and a very satisfying way
y sound and to to bring new artists along and
ag and to build," introduce the audience to these
'There are more young artists who may be the art
the art fair this stars of the future," Brown said.
ever have been." See ART FAIR, Page 2

cancer cure
By Neal Pais
Daily Staff Reporter
Scientists at the University are cur-
rently developing complex carrier sys-
tems for anti-cancer agents through the
application of nanotechnology - a rap-
idly evolving field of science focused on
the very small. With this technology in
hand, researchers have developed a
means to locally administer drugs at the
cellular level, thereby potentially
increasing the ease with which tamors
may be treated in the future.
During the last meeting of the
Board of Regents on June 19, the Uni-
versity was reminded of its place at
the helm of cutting-edge cancer
research. Mentioned during the meet-
ing was the Medical School's Center
for Biologic Nanotechnology, which
conducts its high-level research with
nanomaterials - complex synthetic
molecules that are hundreds of times
smaller than human cells.
"This is the start of the post-
genomics therapeutic revolution," said
James Baker, Professor of Biologic
Nanotechnology-and the director of
the CBN, as quoted in Medicine at
Michigan, a University publication.
See NANOTECH, Page 2

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