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July 02, 2001 - Image 2

Resource type:
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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 2001-07-02

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, July 2, 2001

INVESTIGATION
Continued from Page 1
The first complaint, the News report-
ed, alleges CSX workers unwillingly par-
ticipated in research and the researcher,
neurology Prof. James Albers, failed to
get a waiver from the workers prior to
performing the study.
The University contends that a waiver
was not necessary since the research was
conducted using data from earlier tests
the workers had agreed to.
The health system, quoting federal
guidelines, said in a statement that
waivers are not necessary if "research
involng the collection or study of exist-
Any tin
Fully coni
serving

ing data, documents, records, pathologi-
cal specimens, or diagnostic specimens,
if these sources are publicly available or
if the information is recorded by the
investigator in such a manner that sub-
jects cannot be identified, directly or
through identifiers linked to the sub-
jects.'
In the second study, a patient undergo-
ing tests for a pituitary tumor com-
plained to the OHRP that she did not
give consent to a study of mangnetic res-
onance images of her brain conducted
while being treated for the tumor.
In its response, the University said the
MRI tests were a mistake due to a mis-
reading of the physician's handwriting.

The University said the physician intend-
ed to order the same tests for the patient
as those participating in a research study, Continued from Page 1
but not for the patient's data to be includ- vations is to control the level of noise in
ed in the study. the auditorium.
"These notations, and several clerical "We're striving to very carefully con-
errors, caused confusion about whether trol air flow and air conditioning so that
the patient was part of a study - for the noise from the mechanical systems will
patient and several staff members," a not impact performances," Baier said.
UMHS statement said. No performances will be held at Hill
The University also countered allega- Auditorium during the renovations,
tions of a conflict of interest since the which poses a problem for organiza-
CSX study was partially funded by the tions that frequently use the building
railroad and that its findings, which drew for events.
no connection between the use of the sol- Karen Wolff, dean of the University's
vents and any ailments, were later used School of Music, said it will be necessary
as evidence in lawsuits filed by the work- to find alternate venues to host perform-
ers, the News reported. ances, but she does not expect the num-
Kara Gavin, a spokeswoman for ber of performances sponsored by the
UMHS, said the company's association school to decrease.
with the study ended after it provided "It will be a major inconvenience for
the funding, as University rules require. us, but we think it's going to be well
"The grant had to come from the com- worth it to have this beautiful hall main-
pany without the company having any tained as an important performance site
control over the study," she said. well in to the future," she said.
Another conflict of interest question
arose due to the fact that Prof. Stanely V A
Berent, who also participated in the
study, serves on the UMHS institutional Continued from Page 1
review board. tuition increases at Big Ten schools.
"He was excluded from any decision "ABTS was a great forum to discuss
or review of that research,"Gavin said. improving government," Cash said.
"Some suggestions we received include
'S A I N different methods to create a more cohe-
sive assembly, work more effectively
W ANTED with administration, and include the city
gtuvr"fnem ltsun atairs.

The University Musical Society, whic
holds about 20 events at Hill each year, i
facing the same probelm.
Fischer said that while the renovatio
might cause UMS to pare down
schedule a little, the restoration provide
an opportunity to explore new ideas.
"It's all about how you look at it, h
said. "It can be 'oh my God, what are w
going to do? Or it can be 'oh my God,
look what we can do!'
With alternate venues in Ann Arbor,
Ypsilanti and Detroit, Fischer said pro-
viding transportation to the different
locations is a possibility and may inclul
other perks such as pre-concert speakers.
Crisler Arena, which is unfamiliar terri-
tory for UMS, is also being considered.
Albert Kahn Associates and Quinn
Evans/Architects are working on the proj-
ect. Albert Kahn himself helped design
the structure, and Quinn Evans is known
for its work in historical preservation.
"It's a very strong team and a very
appropriate team," Baier said.

Gosh. I think I have a
urinary tract infection.

Well, the doctors in Brighton
and Plymouth are lookingf r
women with urinary tract
infections to participate ina
research studyt

. y
You may be eligible if these apply to you:
:Women, generally healthy 18-65 years old
:Presence of one or more of the following:
ePainful urination
:Urinary frequency
*Urinary urgency
:Symptoms for less than 3 days
If you have had any of the following,
you are NOT eligible
eKidney or bladder stones within past 2 years
:Antibiotics with the past 7 days
eMore than 2 urinary tract infections in the
past year
Study-related procedures, study medication,
and doctor's visits are provided free of charge.
Study medication will be provided at the first
office visit.
You will receive $150 for 3 completed visits.
If you meet the above criteria and think that you may
have a urinary tract infection, please call
1-888-ClinSite
to determine your eligibiify

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government in student attairs.
"Since Matt and I are taking over an
MSA that was on life support for the
past year, we're both looking for the best
ways to put the life back into MSA,"
Cash said, referring to former President
Hideki Tsutsmi's turbulent term.
Remnants of that turbulence were evi-
dent at the conference.
"A few unacceptable things did hap-
pen, however, that quite frankly made me
furious," Nolan said. "Unfortunately,
they all stemmed from U of M, specifi-
cally from Jessica Curtin"
Curtin allegedly brought members of
the Defend Affirmative Action Party
who are not University students to the
conference using a University van.

The DAAP members sat in on voti
sessions, and Curtin proposed two res
lutions that had not been previously
approved by the MSA executive officers,
Nolan said.
"The conference was for MSA dele-
gates only ... We were honestly thorough-
ly embarrassed to have had it happen,"
Nolan said. "ABTS was made worse by
this." The issue will be brought before the
general assembly when it reconvenes
the fall.
Curtin chose not to comment on the
allegations but said she felt the confer-
ence was a success because of a resolu-
tion which was passed to educate other
Big Ten schools about recent racial ten-
sions and events at Penn State.
"The ABTS conference did do some-
thing real," Curtin said.
Overall, the delegates generally agree
that the convention was a success.
"We built some bridges that hadn'
existed in the past, as well as set up so
projects that make me very excited just
thinking about them,"Nolan said.
The University will host the next
ABTS conference in February.

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