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July 26, 1999 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1999-07-26

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2 -- The Michigan Daily -- Monday, July 26, 1999

CLINTON It was also am
Continued from Page 1 would commit to t
dard, where those
"I ask you to recommit yourselves ... to fighting discrimina- their time on free
tion, to revitalizing our poorest communities and to giving peo- Additionally, t
ple an opportunity to serve in law firms who would not other- will strengthen
wise have it," Clinton said. dents with chan
The call to action marks the 36th anniversary of the first pres- communities.
idential gathering of the nation's top lawyers and legal scholars Clinton said du
by President John F. Kennedy. disagreement" wit
During his address, Clinton said the Department of Justice affirmative action
and the White House would continue their support for greater After Clinton's
diversity in the nation's law firms, bar associations and within spoke about the 1
the ranks of lawyers. and the College of
Representatives from the American Bar Association and the The lawsuits, fli
American Corporate Counsel Association said they would also based Center for It
commit their organizations to generate greater diversity a factor in admissi
FAIRS
flflContinued from Page 1
P #,Abortion and Reproductive Rights
Action League (MARRAL). Jennifer
N oteboo ks, Anderson, co-president of the campus
organization Students for Choice, said
she was working at the booth to help
spread information about pro-choice
Intel Pentiuml- legislation.
C366MHz Processor "Having a booth at the Art Fair is
12.1" SVGA Display good because of the sheer size of the
32M5 SDRAM crowd," she said. "Since Ann Arbor is a
4Up to H56Mr ) liberal ci we find good support for our
2xAGP ArI Rage Pro 30 causeAnderson added.
4MB SGRAM After the masses left the streets and
(XV OMalabthe artists packed up their goods, the
35" 1.44MB FD cleanup began.
30 Surround Sound A local Boy Scout troop, consisting of
MeNiMH atter ynineteen boys between the ages of 12
w itCD and nual and 17, got to work at 5:30 a.m. yester-
Carrying Bag and day. They cleared discarded containers
AC Adapter included from downtown streets and wheeled
1Labor Wa atad trash to dumpsters for the city to pickup.
Beth Hospadaruck, a parent volunteer
with the scouts, said there was a lot for

nounced that the nation's leading law firms (Yj"
he American Bar Association's pro bono stan- A t/i
firms' lawyers will spend about 3 percent of
work, with full pay.
he American Association of Law Schoos
service programs by providing law stu-faw Sc/oolgrads
ces to volunteer their legal skills in their
ring his address that he expressed "respectful TUsaid.
th court decisions that have abolished certain S But Terry Pell, senior legal coun-
programs. Continued from Page 1 sel for the Center for Individual
speech, Lehman said he and the president the number of University law gradu- Rights, the Washington, D.C.-based
awsuits facing the University's Law School ates who took government jobs law firm suing the University, said'
f Literature, Science and the Arts. declined sharply, minority graduates one way, the study actually discred
ed in October 1997 by the Washington, D.C.- were more likely to start out in a the Law School.
ndividual Rights, challenges the use of race as position in the government. "I think in releasing this study, the
yons. According to the stud,, salaries Law School shows that thev iust

1
t

the troop to clear up.
"Our troop has been involved in the
Art Fair cleanup for the past three years,
and this year there seemed to be more
trash than usual," she said.
An outside contractor, Captain Clean,
organized the cleanup for the food ven-
dors in the vicinity of the Michigan
Union. Captain Clean President Wayne
Clements said this area needed particu-
larly thorough cleaning.
Ronald Peatry, a collection supervisor
with the city's Solid Waste Department,
said the cleanup after the fairs is the
biggest one the city faces each year, sur-
passing even football Saturdays. Peatry
said there was a variety of things the Solid
Waste Department had to take care of.
"Ourjob istoclear any boxes from the
streets, service all the litter cans and pick
up dumpsters throughout the city,"
Peatry said. "This year's cleanup has
been much better than some of the past
years, people have been right on top of
things."

differed on average in the 1980s for
white and minority graduates, with
minority graduates earning an aver-
age of $104,500 per year while
whites graduates earned a mean of
$127,700 per
year.

don't get it," Pell said.
Pell cited one of the study's find-
ings that indicates although Law
School Admission Test scores and
undergraduate grade point averages
may not
indica te

The authors "we are train!ng.
of the survey
reported that eople who are
this disparityP
can be tied to leaders in societv"
the fact that
white graduates .- Jeffrey Lehman
took higher Law School dean
paying posi-
tions in law firms. CIR has stressed that1
But the differences between initial and undergraduate grad
placement in firm and non-firm the determining factorsi
positions began to change as most to the Law School, Lehi
graduates of the 1990s reported to other factors in admissio
have began their legal careers in pri- ing race, socio-econori
vate law firms. and educational study
Although the study provides inter- better mix of students.
esting information about the demo- "When we speak o
graphics of the Law School student class, we speak of div
body and later success in the legal senses," Lehman said,
field, University Deputy General diversity of the student1
Counsel Liz Barry said it is too soon educational experience f
to tell whether the study will be used The Law School triali
in the University's defense in the scheduled to begin at th
upcoming trial facing the school. month in a federal cou
"We certainly think that the study but Barry said she susp
is a great affirmation of the success will be postponed unti
of our admissions policies," Barry fall.

" 1 '' % a %
success
after grad4
ation, they
do "corre-
late strong-
lv with law
s c h o o 1
grades."
W h i l e
LSAT scores
es should be
in admission
man said thy
ns - includ-
c background
- creates a
f a diverse
ersity in all
adding that
body adds to
for everyone.
is tentatively
e end of ne
rt in Detro ,
ects that date
i later in the

Intel PFntlum l-
C466M Hz FProcessor
14.1"1024x768 XGA TFT Display
64MB SDRAM
(U to 256MB)
6.6gHard Drve
2xAGP ATI[Rage Pro
3D 4MB SGRAM
24X CD ROM
(DVD Available)
3.5" 1.44MB FOD
3D Surround Sound
Smart Lithium-ION Battery
Microsoft Windows 98 with
CD and Manual
Carrying Bag and
AC Adapter Included
1 Year Parts and
Labor Warranty

N

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