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July 13, 1998 - Image 2

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Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1998-07-13

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2 - The Michigan Daily - Monday, July 13, 1998

LAWSUITS
Continued from Page 1
effective as it can be made."
Godfrey Dillard, an attorney repre-
senting the high school student coali-
tion, said the judge's decision was not
unexpected because of the courts'
increasingly conservative stances.
"The traditional court was a refuge
for the oppressed. Now, courts are mov-
ing away from that role," Dillard said.
"We see retrenchment on a broad

range"
Dillard said the coalition is in the
process of meeting to decide
whether to appeal Duggan's deci-
sion. Dillard added that attacks on
affirmative action are occurring not
only in the courts but in education
and business.
LSA senior Jessica Curtin, one of
students seeking to intervene, described
the judge's decision as outrageous.
"Our futures are being decided over
our heads,' Curtin said.

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TERMINAL
Continued from Page 1
viewing by members of Northwest, as
well as the Federal Aviation
Administration.
"The virtual reality helps the FAA to
conduct studies on the terminal," Beier
said. "With it, they are able to check
things such as the visibility from the
control tower."
The virtual reality terminal design
provides the ability to change the model
in any way and then see how the termi-
nal operates with those modifications.
"VR has a lot of advantages over
physical models," said Ross Bama, an
Engineering sophomore who has been
working on the project. "With VR, you
can make any kind of manipulations
you want."
Beier used the height of the control
tower as an example of one of the most
important features that can be modified.
"By increasing the height of the
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tower, you can check to make sure that
all parts of the terminal are visible from
the tower," Beier said.
Other adjustments are also possible.
"You can also turn on and off aircraft,
change or magnify viewpoints, change
the size of an airplane, change the design
of a structure, or even pick up and move
around the tower," Barna said.
Beier's group has been working on the
Midfield Terminal project since October.
The new terminal will include the West
Concourse, which will handle smaller pri-
vate planes, and the East Concourse,
which will handle all publicly used air-
craft.
"There will also be a people-mover-
type vehicle, which will transport the
public from one side of the terminal to
the other," Beier said. "This is good,
since Metro Airport is hard to get
around now."
Northwest said it hopes the project will
improve facilities at Detroit Metro, its
largest hub. In a recent study by a Los
ADMISSIONS
Continued from Page1
Alan Levy, director of Housing
Public Affairs, said at this time housing
is still receiving applications for resi-
dence halls for the 1998-99 school year.
"There were concerns about avail-
able first-year classes and overcrowd-
ing,' Levy said.
Last fall, many students were forced
to live in lounges during the first week
of class and in overflow triples. Levy
said over the past few years the-
University has stretched the capabilities
of its housing.
"We anticipate no temporary housing
at all and a very limited use of overfiow
triples," Levy said. "Both University
Housing and the larger University reco-
nized this couldn't and shouldn't occur:'.
Levy added that restrictions placed on
students wanting to return to residence
halls after their first year will also ensure
more space than in previous years.

Angeles-based research firm, Plog
Research, Inc., Detroit Metro ranked
lowest overall among 36 metropolita
airports, with the lowest ranking in fouP
of eight categories, including speed of
baggage delivery, ease of reaching gates,
availability of ground transportation and
ease of following signs.
Northwest carries part of the respon-
sibility for many of these problems
since it is responsible for about 74 per-
cent of all of Metro Airport's traffic.
Jim Faulkner, manager of media rela-
tions at Northwest, said the Midfiel4
Terminal project is an attempt to better
service in Detroit.
"Northwest has outgrown its facili-
ties at Detroit Metro airport,' Faulkner
said. "It definitely needs work."
The Midfield Terminal project is cur-
rently under construction and is expected
to end sometime in 20011. Mr. Beiers VR
model of the new terminal is password
protected and cannot be accessed by the
public.
Levy said overflow triples have been
used for the past eight years, always
"out of necessity."
In response to challenges arising from
last fall's student body, the University
thought it needed to adjust the size of the
class, Peterson said.
"Given what happened last year, it was
appropriate to downsize: Peterson said.
As space permits. the number of stu-
dents accepted from the admissiorS
waitlist to the University will vary.
"Only a fesw students were admitted
from the waitlist," Peterson said. "After
mid-May we begin to project our
enrollment with certaintv.
As of June 15. 56 percent of students
admitted paid their deposits as compared
with 55 percent in 1997. Peterson said
the percentage of minority students for
this fall has not chanmed sig'nificantly.
"The makeup of the student body i
very similar to last years," Peterson sai
Peterson said the University's goal for
this fall's incoming class is to be 5,200.

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ANNUA THE LAtO/ES.
7 bseers
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