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July 14, 1993 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1993-07-14

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Doctors di
do little to
domestic 1
By KRISTINA GRAMMATICO
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
Whatdoesit taketo makethemedi-
cal community pay attention to half of
the U.S. population?
Even though the American Medi-
calAssociation(AMA)isencouraging
physicianstoaskfemalepatientsabout
being a victims of domestic abuse,
most doctors still do not inquire about
abuse and the University has not yet
implemented a specific policy to ad-
dress this problem.
"There's really no hard and fast
policy," University Health Service
(UHS) Clinical Nurse Specialist
Kathleen Rose said.
Basically, physicians ask about
domestic abuse only if they think the
patient is abused. Then the patient is
referredtoaspecialist,Roseconfrmed.
Dr.CaeserBriefer,DirectorofUHS
said doctors do not ask on a regular
basis, but a new urgent care check list
hasquestionsaskingif domestic abuse
is part of the health problem.
One way to aid health profession-
als detect abuse is to clarify depend-
able indicators of abuse.
A recent survey was published in
May'sAMAjoumalArchivesofFam-
ily Medicine and conducted by Uni-
versity School of Social Work Prof.
Daniel Saunders along with Medical
College of Wisconsin researchers L.
0 Kevin Hamberger and Margaret
Hovey.
The purpose was to provide more
information on indicators of domestic
abuse.
The two-month survey, entitled
"Indicators of Woman Abuse Based
on aChartReview ataFamily Practice
Center,"showedthatnearly400women
were asked about their history of do-
mestic violence. Out of 400 women,
130 admitted to being abused.
Outofthe130medicalchartsofthe
abusedwomenonlythreecharts docu-
mented the patient's abuse.
Doctors continually agree this is a
problem, but still ignore it.
"(Doctors) don't ask the female

ebate but
alleviate

Wedneso dv. IA O4. 1993- Thn NA,4nenn Yil. O.,nno Or..Wad -1

[THE SOLAR CAR HAS A FAN CLUB I

3

violence
patients about domestic abuse during
regular check-ups," said Ann Arbor's
First Care medical center Office Su-
pervisor Karen Gonczy.Dr. Gene
Ragland, medical director at St.
Joseph's Mercy Hospital Emergency
Room cited ignorance and fear of in-
terference as reasons why doctors fail
to ask women about abuse.
The survey also found that many
people visit a physician before they
commit suicide. Saunders noted that
female physicians are more likely to
ask their patients about abuse than
male physicians.
The survey also showed divorced,
separated and younger women were
mostlikelythevictims.Italsorevealed
depression as the most dependable in-
dicator of abuse, as opposed to demo-
graphic or psychological factors.
Theresearchersalsonoted the main
limitation of their study was that the
information was gathered from medi-
cal charts instead of questionnaires.
The survey focused on women be-
cause they seekhealth care fortheir ills
moreoftenthanmen.Sincemostabus-
ers are abused themselves,asking men
about abuse during check-ups would
not be as fruitful. They do not visit
clinics frequently.
"The percentage of men going for
helpisverylow,"saidSaunders."(Past
abuse) shows up in alcohol and drug
abuse.Becauseitoccuredin childhood
it won't belinkedtomedicalproblems.
Men usually act out their victimiza-
tion," said Saunders.
But even though AMA journals
recommend physicians ask about do-
mestic violence, most physicians at
healthclinics do not ask about domes-
tic violence on aregular basis-even
when femalepatientshave bruises,cuts
or burns.
Susan McGee from Ann Arbor's
SAFE House confirmed. She said
women in support groups have men-
tioned that doctors fail to ask.
"It just doesn't occur to them to
ask," said McGee. "Or (doctors) don't
see it as the doctor's role to help."

PETER MATTHEWS/Daiy
Sen. Carl Levin (D-Mich.) received a team shirt Monday from members of the Maize & Blue
solar car team after congratulating them on their Sunrayce 93 victory.
Homecoming to berevamped

By KELLY BATES
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
Big-namestarsand plentyofschool
spirit is in store for this year's home-
coming, said David MacDonald, Uni-
versity Activities Committee's(UAC)
homecoming planning committee co-
chair.
"We're planning an event to gear
students up . to generate student
spirit," he said
Although nothing will be definite
until August 1, MacDonald said there
will be entertainment of interest to
students and alums alike during home-
coming week.
UAC is trying to appeal to more
students this year by getting them in-
volved with the activities. "Specifi-
cally Friday night the idea is to attract
both alumni and students, but students
first and foremost," MacDonald said.
Festivities will tentatively kick off
Wednesday, Oct. 20. MacDonald said
the committee would like to have ac-
tivitiesatnoonontheDiag Wednesday
through Friday.
One activity being discussed is
"Maize and Blue Day"on Friday. Stu-
dents and alumni would show their
school pride by wearing maize and
blue.
'We're interested in involving lo-

cal business ... to give away prizes to
people forhaving been apartof(Maize
and Blue Day)," MacDonald said.
Other scheduled events are Evans
Scholars' Car Bash and Sigma Alpha
Epsilon's Mud Bowl.
MacDonald said MSA may spon-
sor an event, but, "We stillneed to talk
with them about the specifics."
The marching bandwilltentatively
stage a pep rally Friday night on the
steps of Rackham to heighten school
spiritin bothstudentsandalums before
the game on Saturday against Illinois.
"The cheerleaders are very inter-
estedinhelping out(with thepeprally),"
MacDonald added.
Special Events, aUACcommittee,

and Laughtrack are working with
UAC to bring ina "big-name star"
forentertainmentWednesdaynight.
Likewise, Viewpoint Lectures'
co-chairs Randy Sklar and Jason
Sklar are working with the commit-
tee to schedule a comedian for Fri-
day night after the pep rally, possi-
bly at the Power Center.
"It's taking awhile (to schedule
entertainers) because they're nego-
tiating with their agents,"
MacDonald explained.
He admitted bringing in super-
stars for a homecoming celebration
is unconventional. "It would make
for an entertaining evening for both
students and alumni."

Regents to set '93-'94 tuition rates

Religious
Services
LUTHERAN CAMPUS MINISTRY
LORD OF LIGHT LUTHERAN CHURCH, ELCA
801 South Forest (at Hill Street), 668-7622
SUNDAY Worship-1Oa.m.
WED2NEDAY: Bible Study-6 p.m.
Evening Prayer-7 p.m.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT PARISH
(A Roman Catholic Community at U-M)
Corner William and Thompson St.
Acmsfrom CottageInn
Weekend Liturgies- MONDAY &
WEDNESDAY: 5:10 pm
FRIDAY: 12:10 pm
SUNDAY; 8:3 am, 10 am,
12 noonand Rpm
TEMPLE BETH EMETH
A Reform Congregation
2309 Packard Road
Rabbi Robert Levy
FRfl2AY: Services 8:00 pm
6654744
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL, LCMS
Summer ScheduleMay-August
SUNDAY2~: Worship-9:30 .m.
11Lkl2NES]2AY: OuppefAtivities-6 ip.m.
1511 Washtenaw,near HilltSt.
Pastr E Krauss, 663.5560

THE UNIVERSITY
OF
MICHIGAN
BALLROOM
DANCE CLUB
Starting in May, we meet at
the Student Union every
Sunday night to dance the
Swing, FoxTrot, Waltz
Cha Cha, Rumba, Tango,
Mambo, Quickstep, and
other dances.
Come at sevenfor a
beginning lesson
Come in at eightfor
general dancing
Come alone or with a
parinr
Come only once or
every week
Any questions?
Cal668-2491

By HOPE CALATI
MLY EETOREI CEFE
The University Board of Regents
will vote on the 1993-94 budget --
including tuition increases -- at the
Friday morning installment of its July
meeting.
Last year, in-state undergraduate
tuition rose 9.9 percent and out-of-
state undergraduate tuition rose 7.5
percent. A similar rise is expected this
yearprimarilybecausethefundingfrom
the state of Michigan remained the

same as the past two years.
The Michigan Student Assembly
is planning to dispute the impending
tuition increase.
University President James
Duderstadt said tuition will rise again
because the "very deep subsidy by the
state is no longer there."
He added thatsome of the revenue
fromhigher tuition will fund financial
aid.
"We try to honor a commitment
thatnoin-state students willibe denied

for financial reasons," he said.
Thefinancialaid will, as always, be
based onneed. "The pointis,however,
that we can't discount as deeply for
Bloomfield Hills if students from De-
troit can't attend."
Duderstadt did not reveal the
amount of the tuition increase but said,
"We've tried our best to keep it under
double digits."
The regents will also decide on the
fees for registration and infrastructure
maintenance.

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