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July 14, 1993 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily Summer Weekly, 1993-07-14

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2 - The Michin nDaily Summer W kaly.- WannooAgw.IL I A 10 2

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Students at odds over Race or Ethnicity Requirement
By J.B. AKINS (ROE) Requirement. It posed nine the College for the Fall Term of 1991 teaches people how to walk a mile in not the way they want to be educated.
DALY STAFF REPORTER questions about their opinions on the and all entering students thereafter. other people's shoes." Some felt the requirement should
The College of LSA decided re- purpose and usefulness of the require- Studentreactiontotherequirement Although some students think the not be limited to one group.
cently to allow its students to take part ment. was mixed. requirement is worthwhile, other re- " It's a good thought behind it,"
in a mini role-reversal. For once, the The Curriculum Committee, the "I thinkit's anexcellentidea,"LSA spondents disagreed. LSA sophomore Angie Blaising said,
students got a chance to grade the approving agency for LSA courses, senior Gwyn Hulswit said. They said that diversity is being "butitshouldbeextendedtothewhole
University. implemented the ROE Requirement to "After taking the (ROE) class, you pushed upon them and added students student body, not just LSA students."
Recently, a committee of the LSA encouragestudentexposure to courses realize how much you don't know won't learn without interest. "I think it's a half-assed attempt
Student Government surveyed a ran- addressing issues confronting race and about other people," she added. Others said the need for diversity because there needs to be more than
dom sample of 800 LSA students con- ethnicity.The ROE Requirementmust "I thinkthe requirement is needed," education is a good idea, but requiring one requirement to change people's
cerning the proposedRace or Ethnicity be fulfilled by all students admitted to LSA sophomore Ed Shin said. "It 'tudents to attend diversity classes is minds." she added.
Camps mean money
NEA N for area merchants

I
I

By BRYN MICKLE
DAILY STAFF REPORTER
Everyday at 8 am. an army of
would-besports superstarscan beseen
marching down State Street toward
South Quad.The impetus for this mas-
sive invasion - Michigan Summer
Sports Camps.
This summer, an estimated 8,000
high school-age and younger students
will converge on campus for the op-
portunity to be tutored by their favorite
Michigan coaches and athletes. What
does this mean to area merchants? A
lot of money.
TheSubwayintheUnionestimates
a40-percent increase in summer prof-
its-asadirectresultofcampers. The
restaurant encourages its youthful pa-
tronage by offering special incentives
in the form of free soft drinks.
"Wedoalotbettertlanotherstores,
becaused we offer (campers) special
deals," Store Manager Corey Frame
said.
But pizza continues its reign as the
most popular food item among camp-
ers.
With this increase in summer busi-
ness comes certain drawbacks, said
Mike Gill, a driver for Cottage Inn
Pizza.

"(Campers) give us a lot of busi-
ness, but drivers hate them because
they never tip," he said.
Fortunately for non-food service
entrepreneurs,thecampersrelyonmore
than food alone.
Dan Patterson, an employee at the
Union's Study Break Game Room,
said many youths flood the arcade be-
fore, during and after their daily ses-
sions.
"It's like having the regular stu-
dents back in town," he said. "I just
know it's pretty crowded all of the
time."
Notonetomissoutonthelucrative
merchandising aspect of camps, the
managerofMoe'sSportsShopsaidhis
store lies dormant in the summer until
the campers stroll into town.
"This is basically our business in
the summer - kids buying all of the
Michigan stuff," Jamie Demers said.
In oneofthestrangersummerbusi-
ness ventures, the Coach and Four
Barber Shop has transcended its nor-
mal offering of a shave and a haircut.
While campers waittohavetheir bangs
trimmed, the barber will sharpen their
ice skates - for a $3 fee.
Daily Staff Reporter James Cho
contributed to this report.

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The Michigan Daily Summer Weekly ISSN 0745-967) is published Wednesdays during the spring and summer
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ADDRESS: The Michigan Daily, 420 Maynard Street Ann Arbor, Michigan 48109.1327
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EITORSA ' TAF H. . Ca.i dtri he
NEWS Jan DiMascio, Managing Editor
NEWS EDITOR: Michele Hatty
STAFF: J.B. Akins,. Kelly Bates. Julie Garrett, Kristina Grammatico. Steve Hegedus.Andrea MacAdam,
Bryn Micke.
OPINION Sam Goodstein, Flint Wainess, Editors
STAFF: Julie Becker, Amy Flamenbaum. Marc Spindleman.
SPORTS Ken Davidoff, Editor
STAFF: Brett Forrest. Antoine Pitts. Jaeson Rosenfeld,.J.L. Rostam-Abadi.
ARTS Megan Abbott, Nima Hodaei, Editors
STAFF: Melissa Rose Benardo,. Jason Carroll, Oliver Giancola.Alison Levy. Darcy Lockman, Colleen Olle.
John Rybock. Liz Shaw. Scott Sterling., Kirk Wetters. Chris Wyrod.
PHOTO Evan Petrie, Editor
STAFF: Mary Koukhab. Heather Lowman. Peter Matthews, Martin Vioet.
SALES Mike Wiletzky, Manager
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES: Sunka Dutta. Jennifer Pine, Monique Rusen,. Gillian Troanowski. Anyka Turner.
SYSTEMS ANALYSTS Matt McLean, Sean Sweda

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