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July 13, 1982 - Image 4

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Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1982-07-13

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Page 4--Tuesday, July 13, 1982--The Michigan Daily
Congress reluctant to
send troops to Beirut

WASHINGTON (AP) - Congress
returned from its Fourth of July recess
Monday expressing increasing doubts
about the wisdom of sending U.S.
Marines to Lebanon to take part in a
peacekeeping force.
"For the most part, I am apprehen-
sive," House Majority Leader Jim
Wright, (D-Texas), told reporters. He
said the situation in Lebanon changes
so much from day to day that it is un-
certian what the mission of the troops
would be.
SENATE Republican leader Howard
Baker said that in his home state of
Tennessee he found "very little sup-
port" for sending troops to the war-torn
Middle Eastern country. He said the
Marines "would be in a very, very dif-
ficult situation" and he hopes President
Reagan will not send them.
Reagan said Sunday that he stood
by his offer of 1,000 U.S. Marines to aid
the evacuation of Palestine Liberation
Organization guerrillas from Beirut,
but that he is "wary" of the idea and
has had no formal invitation from the
Lebanese government.
Resistance to the proposed troop
deployment was only part of the discon-
tent in Congress over the June 6 Israeli

invasion - discontent that could en-
danger the administration's request for
more aid to Israel.
"IN A YEAR what we are slashing
budgets . . . never have I been ap-
proached by as many of my colleagues,
and I am in sympathy with them, that
we cannot any longer support his level
of assistance for Israel, particularly
when it is endangering the entire
position of the United States as a
mediator, a peacemaker in the Middle
East," said Sen. Charlges Percy (H.-
Ill.) Chairman of the Senate Foreign
Relations Committee.
In a Senate speech Monday, Sen.
John Melcher (D-Mont.), spoke of the
Israeli assault on Beirut. "The attack
has gone on too long," he said. "The
word from the United States should be
very blunt and direct: Withdraw forth-
with and permit humanitarian efforts
to proceed."
In Lebanon, negotiations to end the
Israeli siege of Beirut are stalled
because there is no Arab country
willing to take the Palestine Liberation
Organization's guerrillas, a key
Lebanese mediator said yesterday.

Britain to send prisoners
back to Falkland Islands

(Continued from Page 1)
flict had ceased.
. The Foreign Office said these in-
dications came partly in an exchange of
messages with, Argentina and partly
from other sources, including "con-
fidential statements" relayed from
Argentina.
the contentsof messages released by
the Foreign Office showed Argentina
spoke only of "the present state of de
facto cessation of hostilities."
BRITISH officials explained
privately "we still have to be careful
that we are not bombed again."
Thus, the 200-mile "total exclusion
zone" imposed by Britain around the
Falklands and a blockade 12 miles out
from the Argentine coast will remain
along with the trade and economic san-
ctions pending "further consideration,"

the Foreign Office said.
The blockades were imposed to
prevent Argentina from supplying its
forces on the islands, although .some
ships and planes got through.
IN WASHINGTON, President
-Reagan announced on Monday the im-
mediate lifting of U.S. economic san-
ctions imposed against Argentina in
support of Britain.
the 593 prisoners - Britain earlier said
it held 590 but did not explain the new
figure - include 35 described as "volun-
teers" helping to clear mines laid by
the Argentines. One of the 35 was
wounded when a mine exploded but he
would be sent home if his medical con-
dition allowed it, the Foreign Office
said.

In Brief
Compiled from Associated Press and
United Press International reports
Britain faces railway shutdown
LONDON- Britain appeared yesterday to be headed toward a total shut-
down of its state-run national railway, crippled for nine days by train
engineers vowing to remain on strike until new work schedules are scrap-
ped.
The British Railways Board was scheduled to meet today to decide
whether to continue to operate the 11,000-mile system, now running at about
10 percent capacity with engineers crossing picket lines.
A total shutdown would lay off 167,000 employees.
tish Rail said it operates about 1,500 passenger trains and 90 freight
tr ins yestrday, and said 700 of about 25,000 engineers had reported for
duty. The rail road normally operates about 15,500 passenger trains and
1,500 freight trains on weekdays.
Train wreck in Mexico kills 48
TEPIC, Mexico- A passenger express train known as The Bullet jumped
the rails near this Pacific coast city and plunged into a deep ravine, killing
as many as 48 people, authorities said yesterday. At least 80 more were
reported injured.
One official estimated the train was carrying more than 800 passengers
and said many were still pinned in the wreckage. Rescue workers with
blowtorches and special tools for cutting steel were trying to free them, he
said.
The train was bound Sunday for Mexicali, across the border from
Calexico, Calif., to Guadalajara, 332 miles northwest of the Mexican capital,
an official for the Nayarit state attorney general's office said. Earlier,
federal officials had reported the train began its trip in Nogales on the
Arizona border.
Couple attempts to bilk Reagans
of $1 million in house purchase
LOS ANGELES- An elderly couple was charged yesterday with trying to
bilk President Reagan and his wife Nancy of about $1 million ina fraudulent
deal to buy the Reagans Pacific Palisadeshome last summer.
Mrs. Reagan, who had the swimming pool drained so the prospective
buyers could inspect it, is expected to testify for the prosecution if the case
comes to trial.
In a court appearance shortly after the charges were filed, the attorney for
Ann and James Yarbrough complained bitterly that details of the case had
been released in local newspapers and said, "I think it's being made into a
circus, because the president's name is involved."
Investigation of jet crash begins
KENNER, L. - Bulldozers shoved shattered homes into 12-foot piles of
rubble yesterday and families began burying the dead as federal officials
tried to determine if bad weather caused the crash of a Pan Am jetliner that
killed 153 people.
Officials of the National Transportation Safety Board said it may take six
months to find out why the Boeing 727 plunged into a residential neigh-
borhood two minutes after taking off from the New Orleans airport Friday
afternoon.
Barbara Dixon of the National Transportation Safety Board said most of
the major pieces of the jetliner have been piled together at a remote area of
the airport.
Included ar the three engines, a large chunk of the tail, and mounds of
scraps and small pieces. The disintegration was so complete that Ms. Dixon
said investigators don't even have rows to seats to work with - just some
twisted remnants.
"We will not be able to do a total reconstruction," she said. "It would be
impossible."
IRS cracks down on church
built by marijuana smugglers
HORSESHOE BEACH, Fla. - In rural Dixie County, people call it the
curch that marijuana built. But revenue agents say no matter who built it,
they've got it now.
The Internal Revenue Service has slapped a lien on My House of Prayer,
an interdenominational Protestant church that was built several years ago
by Floyd "Bubba" Capo, 49, a fisherman who is now serving a 38-year sen-
tence for marijuana smuggling.
Caop says he got the $30,000 to build the church from grateful smugglers
with a note that said, "Bubba, build your church."
But the future of the church is in doubt since the IRS issued its lien, which
is designed to recoup $1.1 million the government says Caop owes in income
taxes.
The present pastor of the 69-member congregation, the Rev. Maxine Bir-
chfield, is confident God wil protect the church.
"God has placed us here for apurpose," she said Monday. "If IRS comes
up with a figure, I think God will bless us so we can buy the building."
Money for the church, Capo says, was left in a paper bag on his back porch
by men from St. Petersburg who appreciated his silence when they were
caught smuggling marijuana into Dixie County nine years ago.

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POETRY
LIKE IT? DO WE HAVA A CASS FOR YOUII1iI
IANI ATWO-WEEK WORKSHOP ON READING
f AND WRITING POEMS, OFFERED FOR
TWO CREDITS UNDER EITHER ENGLISH
578 OR EDUCATION D-508.
JULY 19-30, WEEKDAYS FROM 1:00 TO
W HEN 4:30 PM.
W H ERE 1602 HAVEN HALL.
INSTRUCTOR-STEPHEN DUNNING
*HSENIORS, GRADUATE STUDENTS, AND
SPECIAL STUDENTS INVITED TO ENROLL.
PICK UP OVERRIDES AT 1228 SCHOOL OF EDUCA-
TION FOR ED CREDIT, 7607 HAVEN HALL FOR ENG-
LISH CREDIT. CRISP without late fee worries until
july 19.
ENGLISH 578/EDUCATION D-508 WILL FEATURE READINGS BY REGIONAL
POET, MALCOLM GLASS, AND OTHER LOCAL WRITERS. STUDENTS WILL READ
WORKS OF WELL-KNOWN CONTEMPORARY POETS AND WRITE POEMS RE-
SPONDING TO EXERCISES AND DISCUSSIONS.

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