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May 13, 1980 - Image 2

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Michigan Daily, 1980-05-13

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Page 2-Tuesday, May 13, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Atlanta desegregation
effort struck down
by Supreme Court

0

From AP and UPI
WASHINGTON - The Supreme
Court yesterday struck down legal ef-
forts to consolidate Atlanta's
predominantly black school district
with nine suburban districts.
By a 5-3 vote, the justices upheld two
lower court rulings that there is no
basis for combining the individual
school districts for racial
desegregation.
IN OTHER actions yesterday, the
court:
* Rejected an attempt by actress
Jane Fonda and her political activist
husband, Tom Hayden, to obtain files
about them from the National Security
Agency, a highly secretive monitoring
agency, and;
" Refused by a 6-3 vote to expand
criminal suspects' so-called Miranda
rights and reinstated a Rhode Island
man's murder conviction. The action
set aside a Rhode IslandSupreme Court
ruling striking down Thomas Innis'
conviction on grounds that he led police
to the murder weapon following im-
proper police interrogation. Innis led
police to the weapon after a police of-
ficer, in conversation with another of-
ficer, noted that the weapon might be

found by children and cause them in-
jury.
THE SCHOOL district consolidation
sought by black parents in their 1972
lawsuit would have created a "super-
district" stretching over an area as
large as Delaware.
It would have combined Atlanta's
schools with those in three other city
districts - Decatur, Buford and
Marietta - and with schools in six
county districts - Clayton, Douglas,
Fulton, DeKalb, Gwinnett and Cobb.
Massive busing would be required.
The black parents said such a
sweeping desegregation remedy was
needed to give black school children in
Atlanta an equal education.
YESTERDAY'S ACTION in the
Atlanta case represents a ruling on the
merits of the Atlanta case, but does not
mean that the Supreme Court never
would allow a desegregation remedy
stretching across school district lines.
Just last month, the justices refused
to scuttle a massive desegregation plan
already in effect in the Wilmington,
Del. area. That plan combined
Wilmington's school district with 10
surrounding suburban school districts
to form a district 10 times the size of
any other in the state.
When the desegregation suit was
filed, there was some disagreement
over its proper forum. As a result, two
parallel and identical cases emerged -
one before a single federal trial judge
and one before a three-judge panel.
BOTH COURTS reached identical
See COURT, Page 14

*g *
STEVE'S LUNCH
* We Serve Breakfast All Day *
Try Our Famous 3 Egg Omelet *
with your choice of fresh bean sprouts, mushrooms, *
green peppers, onion, ham, bacon, and cheese.
See Us Also For Our Lunch & Dinner Menus *
* 1313 S. University Open Tues.-Fri. 8-7, Sat., Sun. 9-7 *
STRUGGLE FOR JUSTICE IN
LATIN AMERICA
May 14-7:30 pm: CHILE
Eleana Maya-Rogglo. Residential College, U of M, presents current
events and issues in Chile. The role of the Church is also addressed and
discussed.
May 21-7:30 pm: CUBA
Members from the first "Christians for Socialism" from the U.S.
to Cuba presents the slide show, "Cuba Revolution of Promise and
Challenge." The show includes a brief Cuban history, information on
economic planning and social institutions, and insights on the role of
Christians in the revolution.
May 28-7:30 pm: Central America
Den Levine, professor of political science, U of M, shows the film: "The
Cost of Cotton," which focuses on Guatemala. Discussion of his experi-
ence in Guatemala follows. Bill O'Brien, Latin American Task of
Detroit, gives an update of events in El Salvador and Nicaragua.
PLACE: Lounge of St. Mary's-Newman Center, Corner of William & Thompson
SPONSORED BY:
" St. Mary's Student Chapel
" Interfaith Council for Peace
" Ann Arbor Committee for Human Rights _
in Lotin America -g
" Office of Ethics and Religion

Mother of the year
Zhurka, a rare Manchurian crane on loan from the Moscow Zoo to the
International Crane Foundation in Baraboo, Wisc., is unquestionably a
contender for National Mother of the Year honors. Sunday marked the
second Mother's Day in a row in which one of the bird's eggs was the first one
hatched for the season at the foundation. A wobbly little red-crowned crane
pecked its way out of the shell at 9 p.m. Sunday. Zhurka, whose species
numbers fewer than 1,000 birds in the wild, has been the foundation's
"mother of the year" for producing more eggs than any of the other dozen of
female cranes at the center. She laid 14 eggs in 1979 and set a one-season
foundation record of 16 eggs in 1978. Zhurka had no comment upon receiving
the honors.,Q
Commencing on the right foot
Barbara Seelye, newly-elected president of Keene State College in Keene,
N.H., never got to deliver her first commencement address. After nearly 600
degrees were awarded Sunday, Seelye began to deliver her speech and the
skies opened up to rain. She told the 3,000 in attendance to go home, quipping
"I'll have this printed and sent to you." One college official commented that
she made many friends. E
One scoop or two?
An elderly man recently drove through the wall of a Cahokia, Ill. ice
cream shop, climbed out of his car, and casually ordered and consumed an
ice cream cone and soft drink, authorities said. "He said he wanted an ice
cream cone and Coke and the people were apparently so taken aback that
they served the guy," said police Lt. Guy Westbrook. Several customers
were present at the Dairy Queen when the car hit the counter inside the
building on Thursday. No one was injured, including the driver, a 67-year-old
Cahokia resident. The driver, who offered no explanation for what
happened, finished the cone at the police station, where he was ticketed for
driving without a license. "There's nothing in the statutes for failing to yield
to an ice cream store," Westbrook said. Q
On the outside
Re-schedule those plans to wash and wax your car today. Skies will be
partly cloudy all day with occasional rain and thundershowers. But behind
each cloud is a silver lining; today's high temperature should reach into the
upper 60's. Happenings
FILMS
AAFC-Desperate Hours, 7 p.m., High Sierra, 8 p.m., Aud. A, Angell.
Committee Latino Americano-Fidel and Cuba, followed by a discussion
of the Cuban refugee problem, 7 p.m., Internat'l Center.
MISCELLANEOUS
Ann Arbor Public Library-Jon Winters, author of "The Drakov
Memorandum," 12:10 p.m., Meeting Room, 343 S. Fifth Ave.
School of Metaphysics-New class in Metaphysics, 7:30 p.m., 219 N.
Main St.
The Michigan Daily
(USPS 344-900)
Volume XC, No. 4-S
Tuesday, May 13, 1980
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