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June 19, 1980 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-06-19

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A2 balloonist claims record
Details inside, Page 3
The Michigan Daily
Vol. XC, No. 30-S Ann Arbor, Michigan-Thursday, June 19, 1980 Ten Cents Twelve Pages
ER falls
five votes
STRIKES BACK
short in
Ill. House

From AP and UPI
SPRINGFIELD, Ill.-The embattled
Equal Rights Amendment, mired for
the past month in political brokering
and a vote-buying controversy, yester-
day was again rejected by the Illinois
House.
Sponsors at a later date can call
another vote on the measure, which fell
five votes short of passage on a 102-71
roll call.
THE VOTE WAS taken hours after
President Carter made a last-minute
push for passage. Carter spoke by
telephone to a recalcitrant black
legislator in attempts to pesuade him to
casta"yes" vote.
Sponsors had said all day they felt
they had lined up the 107-vote three-
fifths majority needed to approve a
proposed federal constitutional amen-
dment, and possibly 111 if they got the
107th vote. But they didn't make it,
despite House Speaker William Red-
mond holding the vote open for any
latecomers.

One of the other sponsors, Rep. John
Matijevich (D-North Chicago), implied
that Republicans failed to deliver the
votes necessary.
IT WAS THE seventh time the Illinois
House has defeated the ERA since
1972; the Senate has defeated it four
times. It has been approved by each
chamber once, but not in the same
year.
The galleries were packed with spec-
tators wearing pro-ERA green and anti-
ERA red as legislators debated the con-
troversial issue.
Supporters argued'ERA was needed
to assure women equal pay, job oppor-
tunities, and financial credit.
BUT OPPONENTS argued ERA
would cause federal interference in
states' rights and promote
homosexuality, abortion, and a
military draft of women.
Reps. Douglas Huff Jr. and William
Henry, both black Chicago Democrats,
voted in favor of the amendment after
See ILLINOIS, Page 11

Looking for Luke on South U.
Darth Vader, villain of "Star Wars" fame, visited Ann Arbor to promote his
new movie, "The Empire Strikes Back," which opened at the Campus
Theatre yesterday. In an interview at Community Newscenter, Vader
said he heard rumors that "a gentleman named Luke Skywalker had
landed in the area." Vader said he found Earth "very pleasant, although
the technology is quite primitive." See story, page :3.

S. African
riots kill
upto 6O

- From UPI and AP
CAPE TOWN, South Africa-Police with shoot-
to-kill orders battled demonstrators in Cape Town's
mixed-race townships yesterday and unofficial
estimates said the toll from two days of the worst
rioting since the 1976 Soweto uprising could go as high
as60dead.
Two days of violent clashes between police and
rioters left more than 200 people wounded, press
reports said.
THE STATE-CONTROLLED South African Radio
reported at least 20 dead, including policemen, in the
spreading unrest which followed the fourth anniver-
sary of the bloody nationwide Soweto riots.
The Cape Times newspaper reported 42 people

dead in the two days of violence but said the toll likely
would rise. The Cape Argus said three hospitals
reported 34 people were deadon arrival and two died
of injuries after being admitted following violent
clashes Tuesday night.
In Washington, Assistant Secretary of State
Richard Moose telephoned South-African Am-
bassador Donald Sole and expressed concern about
the racial turmoil. Department spokesman Hodding
Carter said Moose, who heads the Africa bureau,
deplored the escalating cycle of violence and called
on the South African government to exercise
maximum restraint in its efforts to restore order.
See S. AFRICA, Page 7

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