100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 24, 1980 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
Michigan Daily, 1980-05-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

Page 10-Saturday, May 24, 1980-The Michigan Daily
Car industry skid
continues; sales level
worst in 19 years

4

DETROIT (UPI)-Domestic car
sales dropped 29.1 per cent behind last
year in the U.S. automakers' worst
mid-May sales record in 19 years, the
industry reported yesterday.
It was the sixth straight sales period
of steeply declining sales for the bat-
tered U.S. auto industry.
INDUSTRY REPORTS showed
General Motors Corp. sales in the May
11-20 period were down 26.4 per cent
from last year. Ford Motor Co. was off
32.5 per cent and Chrysler Corp. sagged
43.2per cent.
American Motors Corp. sales for the
period were estimated at 4,500, down
18.8 per cent, while Volkswagen of
America sales of U.S.-built Rabbits
were down .2 per cent.
Rebate programs that Ford and

Chrysler had hoped would spur sales
accounted for a slight improvement
over earlier May figures, which were
the lowest for the period in 22 years.
THE TWO automakers are offering
rebates of between $100 and $1,000 on
virtually all their cars and many
trucks. GM has no rebate programs.
Meanwhile, the Automotive News
reported yesterday that despite shift
reductions at many plants, next week
will be the first in 1980 in which all U.S.
car assembly plants will be working.
The publication said that this week's
U.S. car production, 119,712 units, is an
increase of 13.62 per cent over the
105,362of last week, buta drop of nearly
40 per cent from the same week last
year.

",

State group battles
to lower drinking age

4

By MARY ROURKE
If the Citizens for a Fair Drinking
Age can gather 276,000 signatures by
July 7, Michigan voters will have a
chance to reverse last year's
Proposition D that raised the legal
drinking age to21.
CFDA workers have organized a
statewide push to collect the necessary
petitionsignatures -they already have
about 125,000 - to re-introduce the
issue to voters in the form of a referen-
dum on election day in November.
WASHTENAW County CFDA Coor-
dinator John Snyder estimates that
15,000 signatures have been gathered in
the Ann Arbor ares so far. In an effort
to collect additional signatures and
raise money for the drive to lower the
drinking age to 19, Snyder said CFDA
will sponsor a benefit at Second Chance
on WednesdayMay 28.
Statewide CFDA campaign coor-

dinator Randy Wilhelm said "although
this (drive to lower the drinking age)
has the look of the classic liberal
issue," many established organizations
have voiced their support. Wilhelm said
WXYZ-TV in Detroit recently aired an
editorial, supporting the drive. Other
groupe also back the effort, including
the Michigan Bowling. Proprietors
Association, the Michigan Licensed.
Beverage Association, the Office of
Substance Abuse, and the State Board
of Education, Wilhelm said.
Wilhelm added that Gov. William
Milliken, Secretary of State Richard
Austin, and Ann Arbor Democratic
Rep. Perry Bullard are among state
government officials who support CF-
DA.
Wilhelm said he hopes benefits like
the Second Chance affair will bring the
drinking age issue into the public eye.
"People didn't take the original
proposal seriously; there was no real
organized opposition," he said.
Wilhelm said he believes the 19-year-
old proposed age will help to insure a
successful campaign, because it is
essentially a compromise age that ap-
peals to those who hope to eliminate
drinking in high schools.

Boatlift continues
CUBAN REFUGEES CROWD the shrimp boat Andrea B yesterday morning
in Key West. After several slow days, refugees began pouring into Key West
Thursday night and into yesterday.
State Rep.pursues
tax cut amendment
(ContinuedfromPage3)
property taxes for school funding to state income tax by two per cent.
state income taxes. With the goal of If both houses of the state legislature
equal opportunity in education, the approve it, the Milliken-Legislative
proposal transfers control of schools to Coalition Proposal, sponsored by Gov.
local school boards, provides William Milliken and state legislators,
homeowners and farmers with a will appear on the November ballot.
maximum 25.5 mills on their property This plan would cut property taxes by
while allowing the state to levy a an average of $350 while increasing the
property tax of 30.5 mills on other sales tax from four to 51 cents on the
property owners, and increases the dollar.

i

Th AntAiber Film Coopemtwe Presents at ML: $1.50
Soturday, May 24
WAIT UNTIL DARK
(Terence Young, 1967) 7:00-MLB 3
A tense suspense tale that will surely keep you on the edge of your seat.
AUDREY HEPBURN stars as a blind woman who accidentally acquires an antique
doll stuffed ffil of heroin. Alan Arkin is superb as the sinister hood who breaks
into her house and initiates a terrifying game of cat-and-mouse.
THE 7% SOLUTION
(Herbert Ross, 1976) 9:00-MLB3
NICOLE WILLIAMSON is Sherlock Holmes, ROBERT DUVALL is Dr. Watson, and
ALAN ARKIN is Sigmund Freud in this hilarious mystery spoof. They join forces
to solve the baffling disappearance of a popular French actress (VANESSA
REDGRAVE), and Freud ends up delving into Holmes' dreams, drug addiction,
and obsessive hatred of Professor Moriority. '100% entertainment."-Gene
Shalit.
Next Tuesday: Kaneto Shindo's ONIBABA and Akira Kurosawa's THRONE OF
BLOOD at Aud. A.

CINEMA II
PRESENTS
o#SMALLCHANGE"'Ier
(Francois Truffaut, 1976)
A truly delightful film with a profoundly serious message. Truffout
reveals his true genius and limitless ability to work with children as
he explores the passages of childhood, from a toddler's brave
curiosity to the excitement of adolescent love. "A must for all who
were once children."-Andy Leavitt. -French with subtites. (104
min) 35 mm print.
ANGELL HALL 7:30 & 9:30 $1.50
Thursday: GUYS AND DOLLS

a

F

1

h

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan