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October 29, 2014 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2014-10-29

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Wie £idlixoan Oai j
Wednesday, October 29, 2014

Ann Arbor, Michigan

michigandaily.com

HEALTH
UHS wait
increases as
flu season
approaches

Students report
frustration with
accessibility to
campus service
By NABEEL CHOLLAMPAT
Daily Staff Reporter
Despite reporting high over-
all patient satisfaction, Univer-
sity Health Service - the primary
health care center for the Univer-
sity's campus community - has
reported longer than average wait
times this semester, causing con-
cern for some students.
UHS Medical Director Rob-
ert Ernst, who has served as a
physician and administrator for
11 years, said waiting times this
semester have been particularly
lengthy due to understaffing
issues.
"I can tell you that wait time
for next available appointment
has been running more like a
week instead of 24 hours," Ernst
POLICY
With global
health issues,
. collaboration
becomes key
'U' sponsors
programs to aid
in institutional
partnerships
By IRENE PARK
Daily StaffReporter
In today's interconnected
society, health issues in one
country are hardly problems for
that particular nation alone.
' When the World Health
Organization called a meeting
last Thursday to discuss the
development and distribution
of Ebola vaccines, the gathering
included representatives from
governments, the pharmaceu-
tical industry, research insti-
tutions and medical nonprofit
groups.
Traditionally, non-govern-
mental organizations like the
WHO have been the dominant
figures in global health research
compared to universities.
However, Joseph Kolars,
the director of the University's
Global Research, Education,
See REACH, Page 3A

said. "That puts a lot of pressure
on same-day resources."
Currently, one physician is on
sabbatical, and a nurse practitio-
ner and a physician assistant have
left. This has put added strain on
remaining staff members, espe-
cially with the traditionally busy
cold and flu season approaching.
Engineering senior Kevin
Kacan said he observed such
understaffing in recent visits.
"They don't have enough nurs-
es to keep up with the demand for
allergy shots and immunizations,
so that's a problem," Kacan said.
"And as someone that pays tuition
to this University, it's frustrating
that the building itself is under-
staffed forthenumberofstudents
there are and that we're forced
to go to hospitals and pay out-of-
pocket expenses."
Engineering junior Dylan
Brown said he's heard of others
who have had lengthy waiting
times at UHS.
"I do know people that go in
because they're sick and they can
See UHS, Page 2A

PAUL SHERMAN/Daily
University President Mark Schlissel discusses athletics, his career in academia and other University issues at a lunch with the Honors rogram in Mason Hall
Tuesday.
isseltalstet
lun I ch with Honors Program

University President
discusses issues of
diversity, sexual
assault on campus
By STEPHANIE SHENOUDA
Daily News Editor
The lunch fare was light but
the conversation was substan-
tive as students in the LSA
Honors Program were invited

to spend an hour dining and
engaging in a discussion with
University President Mark
Schlissel Tuesday afternoon.
Schlissel kicked off the event
by keeping the mood casual,
calling ita relief from talking to
alumni about football.
"I've been on the job for a
little over three months, my
first 100 days was sometime last
week, and things were going
absolutely great until I realized
we have a football team who
people pay a lot of attention to,

and then it started going less
great," he said with a laugh.
In an interview with The
Michigan Daily after the event,
Schlissel added that he loves
football, but feels that the team
having a bad year can often
drown out all of the other activi-
ties around campus. He added
that he was surprised about the
extent to which people are pas-
sionate about hot issues in ath-
letics.
He also said he's been in dis-
cussion with presidents of com-

parable universities and that the
campus cultures are similar in
regards to the role of athletics.
At the lunch, Schlissel
detailed some of his life expe-
riences that culminated in'his
nomination as the 14th president
of the University, including his
studies as an undergraduate at
Princeton University followed by
medical school and a doctorate at
The Johns Hopkins University.
"The biggest thing that
changed my life was getting
See SCHLISSEL, Page 2A

ELECTION 2014
1 CSteele hopes to
increase boards
transparency

ZACH MOORE/Daily
Rackham student Justin Kingsolver addresses a new amendment at the CSG meeting in the Michigan Union Tuesday.
to amend juiciary
nomination procedures

Candidate focuses flex, the University's six-year
integrated medical training
on board's relation program, earning his bachelor's
degree in 1978 and his medical
with public in degree in 1981.In 1987, Steele
became a clinical assistant pro-
second run fessor at the University, a posi-
tion he held for more than 20
By CLAIRE BRYAN years.
Daily StaffReporter Steele's grandfather, Harold
Steele; who graduated in 1925,
Robert Steele, a cardiologist played football for Michigan
at St. Joseph Mercy Health Sys- under Fielding Yost. Harold
tem in Ypsilanti, has an exten- Steele spent the majority of his
sive history with the University career in public education, both
of Michigan and the entire high- at the high school and college
er education system. And he level. His grandmother, Fran-
hopes to use this experience if cis Steele, graduated from the
elected to the University's Board University in 1924 and in 1964
of Regents. became the national co-chair for
"I've been around the idea of the endowment campaign.
what is going on in education for Steele's father, Harold Steele,
a long, long time," Steele said. Jr., graduated from the Uni-
"And now is a big transition versity's Dental School in 1952,
time." spent 30 years on public school
In 2012, Steele lost in the boards and founded a communi-
election for University Regent. ty college. His mother, Eleanor
This year, he is running on a Steele, graduated in 1949 from
similar platform, calling for the School of Social Work and
increased attention to transpar- now teaches at Perry Nursery
ency within the University and School.
giving backto the state. "I have a lot of institutional
Steele graduated from Inte- See STEELE, Page 2A

Accountability
in student org.
funding reviewed
By ALYSSA BRANDON
Daily Staff Reporter
Central Student Govern-
ment met Tuesday night to pass
a resolution to stand against
police brutality, discuss a reso-
lution to amend the Central
Student Judiciary nomination

process and discuss a resolu-
tion to increase accountability
for CSG legislative discretion-
ary funds.
Passage of new resolution
to stand against police
brutality and host
corresponding event
Following the voting down
of a resolution to stand in soli-
darity with the citizens of Fer-
guson against police brutality,
CSG members drafted a new
resolution, which was passed

with a nearly unanimous vote.
The resolution acknowl-
edges that police brutality has
been increasing on a national
level. In addition, it outlines
CSG's vow to stand in solitary
with the people of Ferguson,
Missouri against police brutal-
ity.
Seven CSG representatives
wrote this resolution; commu-
nity members and CSG repre-
sentatives both authored the
former one. The new legisla-
tion demonstrates solidarity
See CSG, Page 2A

WEATHER HI: 51
TOMORROW LO: 37

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INDEX
Vol. CXXIV, No.18
02014The Michigan Daily
michigondsily.com

NEWS..............2A ARTS.................3A
SUDOKU...................2A CLASSIFIEDS ...........,....6A
OPINION.. .... ..........4A STATEM ENT...............,.1B

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