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January 14, 2014 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2014-01-14

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ONE - 11 e)1 T\\ I NI I () H I U \ SOl 11)1()ll .\11 I I H I)\l

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Tuesday, January 14, 2014

michigandailycom

I

ADMINISTRATION
'U'Provost
defines AST
task plans
Pollack also will allow for more opportunities
for staff input, as well as flexibility
addresses weather to address issues individually on a
longer timeline.
issues and dean The implementation of the
Shared Services Center has been
appointments delayed to after April--when the
first wave will be transferred.
By ANDREW ALMANI "There has been a lot of work
Daily StaffReporter over the past few weeks really,
Pollack said. "The program will
University Provost Martha Pol- be moving forward in a delayed
lack joined the Senate Advisory fashion, one that provides for sig-
Committee for University Affairs nificantly more input from faculty
for their first meeting of the year andstaff."
Monday afternoon, discussing Pollack stressed that con-
issues related to updating different sultation with affected parties
aspects of University policy, aswell is critically important to the
as plans to continue the search for administration. Over the past
several new administrators. few months, the transition has
Pollack began her presentation received backlash from faculty
by addressing issues surrounding and students. Over 1,100 faculty
the Shared Services Center under members have signed a petition to
the Administration Services Tran- end the transition in its entirety.
sition, a controversial plan that However, Coleman vowed that the
would re-locate 275 departmental projectwould continue, albeit with
staff members to a separate loca- modifications.
tion down State Street. The University chose Thom
Pollack said the tasks that will Madden, the University's direc-
be transferred to the new cen- tor of sponsored events, to replace
ter have been broken into three Rowan Miranda, associate vice
groups. The first wave will focus president for finance, as the point
on some accounting operations, person for AST.
the second human will focus on At the meeting, Pollack said
resource tasks and the third will she is confident that Madden will
entail the remaining financial ensure that faculty's views are not
operations. These defined groups See PROVOST, Page5

LEFT: Chef Eric Lundy prepares sushi Monday at the Lunch Room during Restaurant Week, which will continue through Jan.17. UPPER RIGHT: A southwest
salad Monday at the Lunch Room. LOWER RIGHT: Philosophy Profs. Eric Swanson and Sarah Moss eat lunch with their son Oliver at The Lunch Room Monday.
Rns

Local eateries offer
good food at steep
discounts
By EMILIE PLESSET
Daily StaffReporter
Eat well, students. It might
be the only week you can -
affordably, at least.
On Monday, local restau-
rants kicked off Ann Arbor's
Restaurant Week, a long-
standing city tradition, which

provides students on a budget
with an opportunity to try res-
taurants normally reserved for
a wealthier clientele.
Running through Jan. 17,
patrons can enjoy seven days
of lunch and dinner specials
at fixed prices at 58 down-
town Ann Arbor restaurants.
Throughout the week, partici-
pating venues serve lunch for
$15 and three-course dinners
for $28 - with some restau-
rants offering two for one pric-
ing.
While the event is also held

annually in June, this week's
event will feature more partici-
pating restaurants, including
The Original Cottage Inn, Grat-
zi, Cafe Zola and Frita Batidos,
among others.
Maura Thomson, director of
the Main Street Area Associa-
tion, said the January event is
usually busier than its summer
counterpart because there are
fewer competing special events
offered in the winter in Ann
Arbor.
"We typically try to choose
weeks where restaurants are

historically very slow," Thom-
son said. "We're trying to help
restaurants get a little more
business and give people the
opportunity to try these new
places during a time when it
is not as busy and your odds of
getting a table are better."
Aventura and The Lunch
Room are new additions to
Restaurant Week. Aventura is
a tapas restaurant run by the
owner of Sava's on State Street
and The Lunch Room is a new
vegan restaurant located in
See RESTAURANTS, Page 5

CAMPUS IMPROVEMENT
Science library
renovations to
cause closures

V ROOM, VROO M

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man
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Th
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design
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Board
The n
the m
house
to an
create
style
origin

)esigns call for been relocated to the Hatcher
Graduate Library. The renova-
re meeting space, tion is expected to be completed
by mid-2015.
emoval of print Associate University Librar-
xts from shelves ian Jane Blumenthal, director
of the Taubman Health Sciences
Library, said the building's staff
By EMMA KERR hopes to ameliorate inconve-
Daily Staff Reporter niences caused by the renovation.
"We've been working even
ile renovation of the Taub- before the building closure to
Health Sciences Library minimize, as much as possible,
Monday, the library may the impact of the renovation on
ience periodic closures and students," Blumenthal said.
in the area may at times be However, short-term effects of
ed away from construction the renovation have the potential
to disturb some Ann Arbor resi-
e construction will add dents and hospital employees.
classroom space, technol- Plans are in place for the
pdates and a new library pedestrian paths around the
s, which was unanimously library to be rerouted and bus
ved by the University's stops to be temporarily relocat-
of Regents last March. ed. One lane of Catherine Street
ew layout involves moving will be closed during some peri-
aajority of the print texts ods of the construction. There
d at the Taubman Library will be a temporary bus stop on
off-site location in order to West Medical Center Drive for
more room for discussion- the Research Link bus. All other
classrooms. Some of these busses can be accessed on Glen
al print texts have already See LIBRARY, Page 5

VIRGNIA LOZANO/Daily
Freshmen engineering students Tania Haddad and Vishnu Pilai, members of the MRacing team, work on a seat
mold for the Formula SAE racecar Monday at the Wilson Center on North Campus.
reveals race gaps in
cardiac surgery success

RESEARCH
For energy
efficiency,
planes beat
new cars
Study finds that on
a per capita basis,
jets are less energy
intensive than autos
By MICHAEL SUGERMAN
Daily Staff Reporter
Could a 12,000 pound airplane
be more fuel efficient than acar?
It may sound unlikely, but
according to a report by Michael
Sivak, a research professor at
the University's Transportation
Research Institute, on a per cap-
ita basis airplanes are more envi-
ronmentally friendly than cars.
The report compared levels
of fuel consumption for a given
mileage for a light-duty vehicle
versus a commercial airline
flight.
Results were evaluated by
British thermal unit - a unit of
energy output - per person per
mile. The domestic operations
of all certified air carriers were
See FUEL-EFFICIENT, Page 5

Hospital quality
considered a
factor in results
By SHOHAM GEVA
Daily StaffReporter
While the Patient Protection
and Affordable Care Act aims
to provide better healthcare
access for millions of unin-

sured Americans, a new study
has found that some minor-
ity groups face challenges in
obtaining quality healthcare
for other reasons.
A study released Jan. 8 by
the University of Michigan
Health System linked higher
mortality rates for non-white
patients in cardiac procedures
has been linked with the qual-
ity of the hospital where the
patients receive treatment.

Researchers and doctors
have known about the mortal-
ity rate disparities for a while,
but how hospital quality plays
into them hasn't been as clear.
University Medical School
alum Govind Rangrass, a med-
ical resident at Washington
University in St. Louis, Assis-
tant Surgery Prof. Amir A.
Ghaferi and Associate Surgery
Prof. Justin Dimick conducted
See CARDIAC, Page 5

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