100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 15, 2014 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2014-01-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

~btfficIiga40aIF

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, January 15,2014

michigandaily.com

ADMISSIONS
Applicants
increase in
2013 early
action pool

Documentarian Cynthia Wade speaks at Michigan Theatre during the kickoff to the Michigan Center for the Education of Women 50th anniversary.v
CEW celebrates 50 years

Four percent
increase amounts
to 23,000 Common
App. submissions
By MICHAEL SUGERMAN
Daily StaffReporter
"Congratulations!"
Andrew Boland, a senior at
Rockford High School, located
about 200 miles west of Ann
Arbor, cracked a smile as he
read the first word of the e-mail
from University Admissions,
announcing his acceptance.
"I was really excited because
Michigan was the place that I've
always wanted to go," Boland
said. "It's a prestigious school,
it's where I want to be, and I'm
happy to be going there."
Boland was one of nearly
23,000 early action applicants,
marking a 4-percent increase
from last year's batch of pro-
spective students. Last year,
the University received about

22,000 early applicants - a
larger bump from the previous
19,000 early-action applicants.
Complete data detailing the
number of applicants admitted,
deferred and denied will not be
available until the admissions
process is complete.
Ted Spencer, associate vice
provost and executive director
of undergraduate admissions,
wrote in a statement that early
action gives applicants more
time to evaluate their prospec-
tive options - which may con-
tribute to its popularity.
"Applicants appreciate know-
ing about their admission sta-
tus before the semester break,"
Spencer wrote.
The University moved from
using a custom application to
the Common Application in
2010, resulting in a much larger
number of applicants, according
to Spencer.
"(It) makes it very conve-
nient for students to apply to
more than one of their top
choice schools," Spencer said.
See APPLICANTS, Page 3A

Event begins
yearlong series of
commemorative
events, programs
By PAULA FRIEDRICH
Daily StaffReporter
The Center for the Educa-
tion of Women began a year-
long celebration of its 50th

anniversary with a screening
of short films by and about
women Tuesday evening. The
films were followed by a dis-
cussion with documentary
filmmaker Cynthia Wade, who
won a 2008 Academy Award
for "Freeheld."
Speaking to the crowd gath-
ered in the Michigan Theatre,
Christina Whitman, vice pro-
vost for academic and faculty
affairs, urged the generations
of supporters and benefactors

to solidify and expand on the
CEW's gains over the past 50
years.
When the CEW was estab-
lished in1964, it served women
who had come to Ann Arbor
with a spouse and were look-
ing to start or continue their
higher education. In the early
1960s, that desire came with
hurdles both within and out-
side of the University. Admis-
sions and hiring policies were
often still explicitly gender

biased, and balancing fam-
ily with a professional life was
difficult.
"It's hard to take seriously
in some ways the kind of views
in the 1960s about women, but
they were certainly very real at
the time," said Carol Hollens-
head, who was CEW's director
from 1988 to 2008.
During Hollenshead's time
at the CEW, the center advised
the University on policies
See CELEBRATE, Page 3A

CAMPUS LIFE
Host of events
planned for
MLK holiday

4-0 IN THE BIG TEN
7

Speakers, student
ofgs. to pay tribute
to national hero
By ARIANA ASSAF
Daily StaffReporter
Although the national holi-
day celebrating Martin Luther
King Jr.'s work only lasts one
day, the University's MLK Sym-
posium has scheduled a wide
variety of events that will last
throughout this month to com-
memorate King's legacy.
This year, the symposium's
theme focuses on the ideas of
how power, justice and love
operate in America, and how
ideas about them have changed
over time.
The symposium is orga-
nized through the University's
Office of Academic Multicul-
tural Initiatives and combines
the efforts of faculty, staff, stu-
dents and community members
to bring in speakers and host
discussions inspired by King's
ideals.

Lumas Helaire, assistant
director for the Office of Aca-
demic Multicultural tnitiatives
and chair of the MLK Sympo-
sium, said the theme "heal the
divide" arose when planners
discussed how King's work
evolved during the years before
he was assassinated.
Last year's symposium
focused on the 50th anniver-
sary of King's historic "I Have
A Dream" speech. This year
aims to address the subsequent
actions he took to fight racism
and injustice.
"King worked largely to
bridge the divide between dif-
ferent groups and races that
come from traumatic events
in history," Helaire said. "It's
great to be a part of something
that honors one of our national
heroes."
The event's website lists 19
different exhibitions, lectures,
discussions and a poetry slam,
all in celebration of the holi-
day. The program will begin on
Monday.
Activist and performer
See HOLIDAY, Page 3A

Sophomore forward Glenn Robinson 1ll helped Michigan achieve its sixth win ina row during the Michigan vs. Penn
State game on Tuesday. Michigan won 80-67.
RESIDENCE HALLS
Diversity Peer Educators
reflect on 4 years of work

PHILANTHROPY
Alumgives
$1M to'U'
Pharmacy
scholarships
Gift to help fund
donor's namesake
fellowship program
By BRIE WINNEGA
Daily StaffReporter
The gifts keep on rolling in.
The University's College of
Pharmacy received a $1 million
donation from Dr. Dinesh Patel
and his wife Kalpana Patel on
Jan. 13. The gift will be added
to theaChhotubhai and Savita-
ben Patel Fellowships, which
were created by the Patel fam-
ily in 2005 to fund scholarships
for graduate students in the
College of Pharmacy.
The donation comes as part
of the University's Victors for
Michigan fundraising cam-
paign, which aims to raise $4
billion overall. The University's
previous campaign, The Michi-
gan Difference, concluded in
2008 with $3.2 billion raised -
surpassing its original goal of
$2.5 billion.
The Pharmacy School hopes
See PHARMACY, Page 3A

Alumni and ing officials to celebrate the
final ceremony for its 40th
volunteers look to year anniversary Tuesday
night.
the future DPE promotes social justice
issues, protection and inclu-
By JULIA LISS sion for all students within
DAily StaffReporter the residence halls and assist
in finding resolutions to bias
The Diversity Peer Educa- incidents.
tors program hosted group Guests were treated to din-
members, students and hous- ner and music before speakers

discussed the impact DPE has
on students as a resource, as it
provides students with a safe
space in the face of adversity
as a result of their race, sexual
orientation or any other issues
with identity. A variety of brief
lectures, poems and songs all
addressed DPE and the indi-
viduality it promotes.
University alum No8l Gor-
See DIVERSITY, Page 3A

WEATHER HI: 23
TOMORROW L: 17

GOT A NEWS TIP?
Call 734-418-4115 ore-mail
news@michigandaily.com and let us know.

NEW ON MICHIGANDAILY.COM
The Working Ethic:-College ethics 101
MICHIGANDAILY.COM/BLOGS

INDEX NEWS....................
Vol.CXXIII,No.55 OPINION................
0)2t13 The Michigan Daily SPORTS.................
michigondaily.com

...2A SUDOKU.....................3A
...4A CLASSIFIEDS...............6A
...7A B-SID E....................1B

f

I I

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan