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January 30, 2014 - Image 1

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 2014-01-30

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Thursday, January 30, 2014

michigandailycom
ADMINISTRATION
'U' declines
to release
Gibbons

PATRICK BARRON/Daily
A worker carries in equipment to dry East Quad's floors after a flooding occured Wednesday. Classes in the building were subsequently canceled.
Pipe burst cancelsclass

Flood affected
first level of
newly renovated
residence hall
By IAN DILLINGHAM
Daily News Editor
One day after the first Uni-
versity weather-related clo-
sure since 1978, some students
were told to take another day
off Wednesday.
Classes in East Quad Resi-
dence Hall were cancelled
Wednesday in response to a
pipe burst in the early morn-
ing, according to a University

press release.
According to the press
release, the break occurred at
9:30 a.m. but caused no dam-
age to residential areas of the
building.
University Housing spokes-
man Peter Logan said he could
not confirm the precise time
of the break, but said the flood
was the result of a frozen one
and a half inch pipe in the fire
suppression system, which
ruptured over the first floor
theatre area.
Fire alarms were set off
throughout the building as a
result of the flooding imme-
diately after the line break.
Logan said the alarms auto-
matically activate when the

system senses a discharge of
water, since that can be an
indicator that the system is
attempting to suppress an
active fire. Fire officials must
investigate the area to deter-
mine there is no fire present
before the alarms can be deac-
tivated.
Logan said fire suppres-
sion systems in the building
are now fully operational.
Most classes in East Quad will
resume normal operations
Thursday, with the exception
of five classrooms that may
require additional repairs. Stu-
dents with classes in affected
rooms will be contacted by
their professors to arrange
alternate schedules or loca-

tions, Logan said.
Wednesday's pipe break
reflects a similar situation in
March 2013 - the flooding
at North Quad - when a fire
suppression supply line, much
larger than the pipe in East
Quad, broke and triggered a
similar evacuation procedure.
The flooding primarily
affected the first level corri-
dors and main concourse
areas. Logan added that regu-
lar dining operations resumed
as normial after the incident,
although an e-mail from resi-
dential advisors to students
suggested that the flooding
might have reached some parts
of the dining facilities.
See FLOOD, Page 3A

inal I
Experts say FERPA
empowers institutions
to release outcome of
sexual assault cases
By MATT SLOVIN and
ADAM RUBENFIRE
Daily Sports Writer and
Daily News Reporter
After The Michigan Daily
reported Tuesday that former
Michigan kicker Brendan Gibbons
was permanently separated from
the University in December, Uni-
versity officials declined to release
any information pertaining to his
academic status, citing the Fam-
ily Educational Rights and Privacy
Act and University policy.
University spokesman Rick
Fitzgerald reaffirmed that stance
Wednesday and cited University
precedent of not discussing disci-
plinary records.
"It's a combination of being sen-
sitive to FERPA, the law, as well
as the University policies that are
more restrictive than FERPA,"
Fitzgerald said.

ruling
Fitzgerald said administrators
deliberated Wednesday on what
course of action to pursue, tak-
ing into account "the letter of the
law, the spirit of the law and long-
standing University policies."
"After consulting the law, con-
sulting the attorneys in the Office
of General Counsel, giving careful
consideration to our long-standing
policy of not discussing student
disciplinary matters publicly, this
is the only information we are
releasing," Fitzgerald said. "We're
not releasing any additional
details."
Without directly referring
to Gibbons, a written statement
e-mailed to the Daily from Fitzger-
ald stated that allegations of sexual
misconduct made in 2009 were
"handled in accordance with the
University policy in effect at the
time."
Though FERPA does not pro-
hibit the University from relying
on its institutional policies as rea-
son to withhold the results of a dis-
ciplinary proceeding, two experts
specializing in media and records
law said in. interviews with the
Daily on Wednesday that the out-
See GIBBONS, Page 3A

CAMPUS LIFE
SAPAC pilots
online chat to
increase aid

VOICES HEARD

m
tc
Un
Th
tion
has o
onlin
that
the t
anon
advo
will
thros
5 p.m
Ar
gram
care,
for th
ratio:
Holly
two
the id
ture
bega

and implementing the pro-
gram about a year ago.
essage system Ensuring users' confiden-
tiality was a primary concern
be open to all when selecting a chat pro-
vider. SAPAC decided to work
iversity students with an Ann Arbor-based
company, Alark, on the proj-
By JULIA LISS ect.
Daily StaffReporter Next, the technical staff
worked to set up the chat on
re Sexual Assault Preven- SAPAC's website in a way that
and Awareness Center would be visible and acces-
fficially launched its new sible. SAPAC began piloting
e chat feature, a program the feature in a beta version
will allow members of last semester, during which
University community to interns would test it a few days
ymously chat with an a week to work out any bugs
cate. The chat feature that might have come up.
be available Monday Given the new feature is
ugh Friday from 9 a.m. to intended for use by the Uni-
. and is free to use. versity community, users are
ny Burandt, SAPAC pro- asked to enter their Kerberos
manager for survivor password to verify their iden-
came up with the idea tity, although this information
7e new feature in collabo- is not revealed to the SAPAC
n with SAPAC Director expert responding to the chat
Rider-Milkovich. The request. Users are also shown
women began discussing a detailed explanation about
lea for an online chat fea- confidentiality and who will
about two years ago and be corresponding with them.
n the process of creating See SAPAC, Page 3A

VIRGINIA LOZANO/Daily
BAMN organizers Joseph Semana and Jose Alvarenga speak at Activism Night as part of the exposure series at North
Quad Wednesday.
ANN ARBOR
Construction on high-rise
buildings moves forward

RESEARCH
Engineering
prof. works to
prepare for
epidemics
Team creates model
for policymakers to
consider in potential
disease outbreaks
By PAULA FREDRICH
Daily Staff Reporter
A fluepidemic inPortland?There's
a model for that.
Engineering Prof. Siqian Shen and
collaborators from Sandia National
Laboratories, a contractor for the
U.S. Department of Energy, have
created an optimization model that
could help public health officials
make decisions about which places
to close in epidemic situations.
The project uses data from Port-
land, Oregons social networks and
censuses to model how the flu would
spread when cities close facilities
to contain it. It builds on previous
simulations by taking into account
people's continued movement after
certain facilities are closed, known
as compensatory behaviors.
The model gives the option of clos-
ing five different facilities and then
See EPIDEMICS, Page 3A

Luxury apartments
to bring over a
thousand new rooms
By HILLARY CRAWFORD
Daily StaffReporter
Two development companies
have received authorization
from the Ann Arbor City Coun-

cil to build new high-rises near
campus.
one building will be built on
top of the south side of Pizza
House at 624 Church Street,
near South University Avenue.
The 14-story building will con-
sist of 76 units, 74 percent of
which will be either one bed-
room or two bedrooms. It is
projected to open to tenants in
August 2015.

University alum Bradley
Moore, owner of the Ann Arbor-
based architecture firm J. Brad-
ley Moore and Associates, will
oversee development and con-
struction of the high-rise above
Pizza House. The restaurant's
owner, Dennis Tice, and Opus
Group, a Minneapolis-based
development company, part-
nered with J. Bradley Moore.
See HIGHRISE, Page 3A

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