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December 06, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-12-06

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N11 E HUMK1NyllEan IIA

Ann Arbor, Michigan

Friday, December 6, 2013m

michigandaily com

BUSINESS OPENING
A2 last stop
for college
wrap joint

l f
TRACY KO/Daily
LSA sophomore Dylan Kossek protests with United Students Against Sweatshops to demand better wages for Wendy's employees Thursday.
*Students protest low wages

Menna's to bring
signature 'Dubs' to
East William Street
By K.C. WASSMAN
Daily News Editor
Though Ann Arbor in known
for being on the vanguard of res-
taurant culture, the incoming
restaurant on East William Street
- Menna's Joint - will be the
sixth campus location for the East
Lansing-based burrito chain.
Menna's will fill the space
recently vacated by Toppers
Pizza, the now-closed pizza fran-
chise at East William and May-
nard Streets. The joint is known
for "the Dub," a grilled wrap
sandwich filled with ingredients
ranging from potatoes to chicken
tenders. Other locations beside
Michigan State University include
Western Michigan University and
Central Michigan University.
Hank Andries, the current
owner of the chain, said they hope
to open the Ann Arbor branch in
March after renovating the East
William space. Andries said most
of the changes in the restau-
rant will be cosmetic, but added
that the kitchen will have to be
changed to fit their needs.

Andries said the company has
been looking for a space in Ann
Arbor for several years, but has
had trouble finding available
storefronts.
"There's a lot of demand and
not alot of real estate, so it's diffi-
cult to find the right location that
fits and makes sense," Andries
said. "So this opportunity came
up and it seemed to be the perfect
fit."
Brendan Cavender, a broker
with Colliers International, said
his company has been working
with Menna's for about five years
and is glad they finally found a
space that is suitable for the res-
taurant.
Colliers also helped bring other
restaurants like Firehouse Subs
and NeoPapalis to East William
Street.
"East William is so close to
campus. It's right next to the
Diag - it was a natural boom that
the retail starts creeping down
there," Cavender said. "And with
the addition to Zaragon (West),
it's really helped the foot traffic
down there."
While Menna's is an East Lan-
sing-based restaurant, it is not the
first chain to have locations near
both the University and MSU.
Rick's American Cafe, Pizza
See COLLEGE, Page 3

Amidst national
movement, USAS
demands better
pay, worker's rights
By BROOKE PEARCY
For the Daily
While it's typically quiet at 9
a.m. as students shuffle to early
morning classes, the Diag was
filled Thursday with cries of
"Hey Wendy's, you can't hide;

we can see your greedy side."
The chants were part of a sol-
idarity event planned by United
Students Against Sweatshops
and JustDems, a committee of
College Democrats that focuses
on social justice issue. USAS
organized the event to support
causes such as an increase in
the minimum wage to $15 per
hour and fast food workers'
right to unionize.
The group of students also
included representatives from
the University's chapter of the
College Democrats, the Lectur-

ers' Employee Organization,
the Washtenaw Community
Action Team and the Graduate
Employees' Organization.
Starting at The Cube, the
group marched through cam-
pus handing out flyers to stu-
dents and delivering letters to
fast-food workers in the Michi-
gan Union and the Michigan
League.
LSA sophomore Ryne Men-
hennick, co-chair of JustDems,
said he hoped the event helped
raise awareness for the cause.
"One of the main goals was

to show the workers that we're
standing with them and sup-
porting them in their struggle
for better wages, better benefits
and better hours," Menhennick
said.
The USAS protest was part
of a larger, nationwide strike
organized Thursday. Fast-food
workers in 100 cities across the
country coordinated a walkout
in support of Fight for 15, a Chi-
cago-based labor organization
of fast food and retail workers.
Fight for 15 contacted the
See PROTEST, Page 3

ANN ARBOR
Tamaki serves
up fusion of
Asian flavors

OPEN PARTY

New E. Liberty
establishment
to provide fast,
affordable eats
By WILLIAM LANE
For the Daily
While Chipotle and Subway
dominate the to-go scene, a
new sushi restaurant plans to
stir up the competition.
Tamaki Custom Sushi and
Wraps opened its doors Nov.
19 on East Liberty Street with
lines of up to 40 students
stretched out the door as curi-
ous patrons waited to sample
the restaurant's signature
"Wolverine Roll."
The restaurant is set up in a
"fast-casual" format - similar
in style to Chipotle or Noodles
and Company - as customers
see their order made in front of
them with their choice of ingre-
dients. Owner Frank Cheng,
who operates several similar
locations in Lansing, said speed
and affordability are key com-

ponents of appealing to a stu-
dent population.
"We triedto fuse alot of pop-
ular elements of Asian cuisine
into our menu, so we are not
the traditional Japanese sushi
joint," Cheng said. "People
want something quick, fresh
and affordable."
Cheng said Ann Arbor pro-
vided a great location to expand
his business due to its large stu-
dent population. To satisfy stu-
dents' late-night cravings, the
restaurant will stay open until
3:00 a.m. Thursday through
Saturday.
Tamaki joins several simi-
lar restaurants on East Liberty
Street that specialize in Asian
cuisine, such as Tomukun
Noodle Bar and TK Wu. Mei
Chen, manager of TK Wu, said
she had not noticed a change in
business since the opening of
Tamaki. She said her restaurant
differentiates itself because
it serves traditional Chinese
food, whereas Tamaki serves
modern fusion.
"College kids come here
because the food is very nice
See TAMAKI, Page 3

TRACYKO/Daily
Art & Design sophomore Luna Anna hosts a free parade for any passerbys to join in on with free party horns, plas-
tic leis, music, and silly string just for "kicks and giggles".
H OSPITAL
University nurse assists in
relief orts in Philippines

CAMPUS LIFE
Students fast
to support
families with
sick children
More than 200
participants forgo food
and water for MSA's
12th Fast-A-Thon
By AMIA DAVIS
Daily StaffReporter
The Muslim Students' Associa-
tion held its Fast-a-Thon Thursday, a
fundraising event aimed to test will-
power, practice self-discipline and
allow non-Muslims to experience
fasting.
Participants fasted from sun-
rise to sunset, and they didn't just
abstain from food and water - they
also opted out of activities like video
games and online shopping, guilty
pleasures that Tayssir Safi Moham-
med, the University's Muslim chap-
lain, said inhibit spiritual life.
In its 12th year, MSA donated
money raised from Fast-a-Thon to
Rainbow Connection, a Michigan-
based organization that grants the
wishes of terminally ill children and
provides assistance to their families.
According to LSA senior Nour
See FAMILIES, Page 3

Launius returns
from trip to provide
medical aid
By CHRISTY SONG
Daily StaffReporter
As most Americans spent
Thanksgiving helping them-
selves to seconds, Tim Lau-

nius, a critical care nurse in
the University of Michigan
Health System, worked in the
Philippines fort11 days, helping
victims of the recent typhoon.
Typhoon Haiyan made
landfall in the Philippines Nov.
7, killed more than 5,000 peo-
ple and left millions of people
displaced. National Nurses
United's Registered Nurse
Response Network sent 3,000

registered nurses from around
the world to assist in the relief
effort - including Launius.
Launius and his relief team
worked to provide aid to areas
receivinglittle attention - pre-
dominantly regions not cov-
ered by major news stations.
The group flew to the Philip-
pines late November and began
work in the mobile clinics near
See PHILIPPINES, Page 3

WEATHER HI: 25
TOMORROW LO: 15

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INDEX
Vol. CXXIV, No. 41
02013 The Michigan Daily
michigandailycom

NEW S ............................2 SUDOKU........................3
OPINION .......................4 CLASSIFIEDS ................. 6
ARTS .............................5 S SPORTS .........................7

4

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