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November 27, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-11-27

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

Wednesday, November 27, 2013

michigandailycom

JUST DANCE

2"d suspect
charged in
murder of
student

ERIN KIRKLAND/Daily
Members of the Michigan Raas Team practice in Mason Hall Tuesday. The team, which is dedicated to promoting Indian culture through dance, will start
competing next semester and plans to travel to competitions at several universities, including Texas and Purdue.
IN REMEMBRANCE
Form e r SPH dean dies inNYC

Third and final
suspect yet to be
charged in murder
of Paul DeWolf
By SAM GRINGLAS
Daily StaffReporter
A second South Carolina resi-
dent has been charged in the
murder of Medical student Paul
DeWolf.
Joei Alexander Jordan, a 20
year-old man from Sumter, S.C.,
was arraigned Tuesday on one
count of homicide, two counts
of first degree homicide and one
count of conspiracy to commit
home invasion.
The home invasion charges
pertain to incidents at 210 North
Ingalls and 220 North Ingalls.
The latter is the address of the
Phi Rho Sigma fraternity, where
DeWolf was found dead in July.
Last week, 21 year-old Sha-
quille Alexander Keiley Jones
was arraigned on identical
charges.

According to Sumter County
court records, Jordan was in
traffic court in South Carolina
on March 19 for a speeding viola-
tion.
David Goldstein, an attorney
from Ann Arbor, will represent
the Jordan, who is currently
being held without bond. His
preliminary examination has
been set for Dec.12 at 8:30 a.m.
DeWolf, a second lieutenant in
the United States Air Force, was
found dead from a single gunshot
wound to the neck in his room at
the Phi Rho Sigma house on July
24. A coworker discovered his
body after he failed to show up
to work at the Ann Arbor Veteran
Affairs Healthcare System.
Earlier this month, police
reported that they had arrest-
ed three people in connection
with the murder. University
and Ann Arbor Police offered a
$10,000 reward for information
in the case, but officials said that
reward wasn't claimed asa result
of the arrests.
One of the three arrested sus-
pects still has not been charged
in the case.

Noreen Clark
remembered for her
relentless dedication
to public health
By SAM GRINGLAS
Daily StaffReporter
Noreen Clark, a former dean
of the School of Public Health,
died in New York City Saturday
after a brief illness.

Clark was the Myron E. Weg-
man Distinguished University
Professor of Public Health and
the director of the University
Center for Managing Chronic
Disease. She was also a pro-
fessor of health behavior and
health education at the School
of Public Health and a professor
of pediatrics at the University
Medical School.
By Tuesday night, almost 90
people had contributed to an
online guestbook commemorat-
ing Clark, posted on the School

of Public Health's website.
Dozens of University faculty
members, and former colleagues
from an array of institutions,
remembered Clark's infectious
smile, wit and can-do attitude.
"We are stunned and sad-
dened by Noreen's passing,"
University President Mary Sue
Coleman said in a statement.
"She was incredibly dedicated to
the health and well-being of oth-
ers, as evidenced by her teaching,
research and leadership as dean.
She was a friend and colleague,

and I will miss her enthusiasm."
During her tenure as dean,
Clark oversaw a multitude
of change within the School
of Public Health. She led the
reorganization of the school's
programs, which reduced the
number of individual depart-
ments, establishing new inter-
disciplinary programs. Clark
also championed the creation of
24 new academic centers.
By the end of her term as
dean, the school led the Uni-
See DEAN, Page 7A

STUDENT GOVERNMENT
CSG meetings
consumed by
election reform

Recent assembly
meetings have lacked
legislation that isn't
related to election
By AMRUTHA SIVAKUMAR
Daily StaffReporter
It has been four weeks since
the Central Student Govern-
ment Assembly last passed an
initiative not related to reform-
ing its election process. As the
current administration gears up
for the winter semester, elected
representatives may not accom-
plish as much as other assem-
blies have in the past, judging
by the volume of legislation
passed.
While Law student John Lin,
a CSG representative, acknowl-
edged that the majority of the
representatives' accomplish-
ments were made outside of
CSG, he said the lack of initia-
tives passed this semester is an
ongoing problem for the assem-
bly.
Lin, who is chair of the Reso-

lutions Committee, said only
one piece of legislation that
dealt with "grassroots initia-
tives" was passed this year. All
other work approved by CSG
either amended the governing
rules of student government or
funded and sponsored campus
organizations.
"That's shocking," Lin said.
"The problem lies in what hap-
pens in a Tuesday night where
it's been overwhelmed by the
rule changes - it hasn't become
that forum for ideas."
In 2010, CSG advocated
student veteran benefits and
convinced University admin-
istrators to provide former
service members with waived
application fees and in-state
tuition. The annual four-day
Fall Study Break in mid-Octo-
ber and more Saturday night
University dining options are
also accomplishments of previ-
ous CSG administrations.
While the executive body
of student government contin-
ued to work on its own initia-
tives - such as the off-campus
bus route and the 24-hour caf4e
See CSG, Page SA

FRIENDLY RIVALRY
Rep. Peters,
Sen. Brown
wager over
OSU game
Senate candidate bets
on Michigan despite
his Spartan past
By KATIE BURKE
Daily News Editor
The matchup ESPN has dubbed
"the greatest North American sports
rivalry of the twentieth century" has
infiltrated an already divided envi-
ronment - the U.S. Congress.
U.S. Senator Sherrod Brown (D-
Ohio) and U.S. Representative Gary
Peters (D-Bloomfield Hills) placed
a "friendly wager" Tuesday on the
outcome of Saturday's football game
between Ohio State University and
Michigan football.
On the line is a six-pack of craft
beer - the loser must give the win-
ner beer from his home state. The
beers of choice are Great Lakes
Christmas Ale, brewed in Ohio, or
a brew from the Detroit Beer Com-
pany, based in downtown Detroit.
Brown initially approached Peters
with the idea of such a wager, which
Peters enthusiastically accepted.
"I'm glad to make a safe and
See BET, Page SA

VIRGINIA LOZANO/Daily
Art & Design junior Elizabeth McCubberey and LSA junior Jake Cinti light candles at the Stop Violence Against
Women event on the corner of South and East University Tuesday.
Objecti fication of women
challenged bystudents

Project connects
violence to potrayal
of women in media
By JACK TURMAN
For The Daily
Many television and Internet
marketers aim to produce the
most eye-catching advertise-
ments hoping that consumers

will remember their product.
But, are they reinforcing negative
gender roles in the process?
The Stop Violence Against
Women event Tuesday night
on the corner of South Univer-
sity and East University Avenues
stemmed from this topic in a
Women's Studies class. Art &
Design juniors Madelyn Etzcorn
and Elizabeth McCubbrey, and
LSA junior Zachary Howard
organized the project to raise

awareness abouthowwomenare
portrayed in the media.
The trio chose to focus on
advertisements because they
believe some can promote rape
culture or the idea that women
can be bought for sex. Their hope
is that the project will create a
safe environment where people
can freely discuss rape culture.
The event included two pro-
jection screens showing a six-
See EVENT, Page 5A

the statement In Washington, D.C., a University staff fights for federal research funding.
g) INSIDE

WEATHER t Hi 29
TOMORROW LO020

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INDEX
Vol. CXXIV, No. 36
12013 The Michigan Daily
michigondoily.com

NEWS ......................... 2A SUDOKU..................2A
OPINION .....................4A CLASSIFIEDS ...............6A
SPORTS ......................6A STATEMENT.. ...........1B

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