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October 04, 2013 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-10-04

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Ann Arbor, Michigan

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Friday, October 4, 2013

michigandaily.com

GROOVIN'N'MOVIN

CAMPUS IMPROVEMENT
New science
building to be
constructed

LSA junior Vinny Sheu, Engineering freshman Kenna Gebissa, LSA sophomore Katalina Faraon and LSA sophomore Sameer Bhagavatula practice for
GROOVE, a percussion performance group, near the Cube Thursday.
ACADEMICS.
U'climbs in ed., rankings

Sources say biology
programs will get
a new home
By SAM GRINGLAS
Daily Staff Reporter
Biologists, hold on to your lab
coats.
Plans for a brand new biology
building on Central Campus are
underway and will likely come
before the Board of Regents for
approval sometime this fall.
The project - first reported by
the Ann Arbor News - will pro-
vide a new facility for the Univer-
sity's programs in Ecology and
Evolutionary Biology and Molec-
ular, Cellular and Developmen-
tal Biology, sources close to the
planning process said. These pro-
grams are currently housed in in
the aging Kraus Natural Science
Building adjacent to the Diag and
Ruthven Museums Building on
North University Avenue, which
currently hosts the Natural His-
tory Museum.
Prof. Robert Denver, associate
chair of research and facilities for
the Department Molecular, Cel-
lular and Developmental Biology,
confirmed the project in an inter-
view on Thursday. He said the
University began seeking input
from faculty in town-hall-style
meetigs over the summer.

After an initial information-
gathering period, the University
has started meeting with archi-
tects to discuss more concrete
plans for the project.
Denver said the plan would
likely call for open-concept lab
spaces. Though open-bench lay-
outs are typically used for bio-
medical research labs, Denver
said the concept would likely
serve the diverse faculty of the
department well.
"The current building is a very
old building," Denver said. "We've
been in it for 98 years and haven't
really received any significant
renovations in that time. Things
are falling apart. It's very dif-
ficult to do modern, life-science
research in this building."
Former LSA Dean Terrence
McDonald, who first initiated dis-
cussion on a new biology facility
during his deanship, said the Uni-
versity has been considering the
project conceptually for the past
few years.
McDonald added that the proj-
ect was important because the
two biology departments train a
significant number of students in
LSA and the current facility was
hindering the recruitment of top-
tier faculty.
"They wanted a facility that
encouraged interdisciplinary
research, that was able to house
cutting-edge equipment and
See SCIENCE, Page 3A

Strength of
research citations
contribute to
strong position
By K.C.WASSMAN and
PETER SHAHIN
Daily News Editors
The University has once
again placed in the Times
Higher Education World Uni-

versity Rankings, moving up
two spots from last year to
number 18 in the world.
The California Institute of
Technology was ranked as the
best institution for the second
year in a row, followed by a tie
at second place between Har-
vard University and University
of Oxford in the United King-
dom.
The University's overall
score was a 79.2 out of 100,
which is lower than past years
despite the higher ranking.

Within its ranking, the Uni-
versity scored highest in aca-
demic citations, which reflects
research influence.
"The University of Michi-
gan's rise up the rankings is
particularly impressive, dem-
onstratingstrengthrightacross.
the board on a wide range of
metrics," Phil Baty, editor of
the Times Higher Education
Rankings, said in a statement.
The rankings are determined
using 13 performance indica-
tors grouped into five areas

including teaching, research,
citations, industry income and
international outlook.
The University ranks 28th
in the "National University"
category of the 2013 U.S. News
and World Report rankings,
but dropped in the QS World
Rankings from 17 last year to
22 this year.
College rankings have been
criticized for a perceived lack
of validity, reliance on peer
reviews and even anchor-
See RANKINGS, Page 3A

Next president
must be a strong
fundraiser

Upcoming leader to
inherit 'Victors for
Michigan' campaign
By TUI RADEMAKER
Daily StaffReporter
As the Presidential Search
Advisory Committee continues
its hunt for the University's next
leader, one of their foremost con-
cerns will be finding an adminis-
trator capable of planning for and
meeting the future needs of the
institution. To do that, an expe-
rienced, proven fundraiser will
be critical.
With , state appropriations
declining by more than
26 percent over a 1oyear
period - dropping from
$416 million in 2002 to
$308 million in .2012
according to the Uni-
versity's 2012 financial
report - the Univer- Filling Fa
sity's Board of Regents
has said that any future president
will be expected to maintain and
build relationships with donors.
During the September 2013
University Board of Regents
meeting, Jerry May, the Uni-
versity's vice president of devel-

opment, reported that 129,000
donors had made gifts to the Uni-
versity during the 2013 financial
year. Gifts totaled $357 million
- a number that has, on average,
increased over recentyears.
Emphasizing the growing
importance of giving, May said
attracting donations remains an
important goal of the University.
"(Fundraising is) huge at a
school like Michigan, because a
school like Michigan has to both
be a public university in terms of
its philosophy and a private uni-
versity in terms of its fundrais-
ing," May said. -
Jennifer Delaney, an educa-
tion professor at the University
of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
and expert in higher
education funding,
said decreasing state
funding has forced
universities to look for
alternative sources of.
revenue,. which often
tming come in the form of
charitable donations.
To conveniently match this
need, she said philanthropists
are increasingly viewing higher
education as an attractive option.
Delaney notes this heightened
focus on development has cre-
See FUNDRAISER, Page 3A

Former Ukrainian president Viktor Yushchenko speaks about nationalism at Rackham Thursday.

TRACY KO/Daily

ADMINISTRATION
School of
Information
expands to
old Borders
Staff pleased that
new location is
close to main office
in North Quad
By MOLLY BLOCK
Daily Staff Reporter
After being housed in three
separate University buildings
since its creation in 1996, the
School of Information will now
make use of 4,000 square feet of
office space in the former Bor-
ders building on East Liberty
Street.
About 12 to 15 staff mem-
bers in the marketing and com-
munications office, the finance
team, human resources and the
information-technology group
will officially move into the new
second-floor office space Friday.
The search for more space
began early in fall of 2012 and
the five-year lease of the new
building was signed in June out
of necessity, Information School
Dean Jeffrey MacKie-Mason
said in June.
' "Wemovedinto NorthQuadin
See INFORMATION, Page 3A

Fmr. Ukranian president
speaks on country's future

Yushchenko says
Ukraine needs
stronger national
identity
By TYLER GRINN
For the Daily
Viktor Yushchenko, former
Ukrainian president who held
office from 2005 to 2010, spoke
Thursday in the Rackham
Amphitheatre about his vision
of the future of Ukraine.

Yushchenko spoke as a part
of the fifth-anniversary cel-
ebration of the Weiser Center
for Emerging Democracies.
Ronald and Eileen Weiser, who
founded the center with a $10
million donation in 2008, were
in attendance.
The title of Yushchenko's
speech was "Shades of Orange:
A Decade of Ukrainian Democ-
racy," a referenceto the Orange
Revolution that occurred after
the 2004 presidential cam-
paign and election.
"In my personal opinion,
our biggest problem and chal-

lenge is that we are not united,
we do not stand as one, we
are not integrated internally"
Yushchenko said through a
translator.
He added that Ukraine's
multiple languages, religious
variations and differing his-
tory textbooks contribute to
the country's fragmentation,
and that he's working to build
a more united Ukraine.
Yushchenko blames the
lack of nationalism on the
country's breakup into sec-
tions controlled by different
See DEMOCRACY, Page 3A

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INDEX
Vol. CXXIV, No. 5
©2013 The Michigan Daily
amichiandoilycom

NEW S .........................2A SUDO KU....................3A
OPINION .....................4A CLASSIFIEDS ...............6A
SPORTS ......................7A FOOTBALLSATURDAY...18

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