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September 19, 2013 - Image 9

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-09-19

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the b-side

U The Michigan Daily I michigandailycom I Thursday, September 19, 2013

in th
By Max Radwin, Daily Fine Arts Wri
,1--

:,,

f you were in Ann Arbor this
spring and summer, you might
have seen a painting or two hang-
ing around - not just in the Univer-
sity of Michigan Museum of Art or at
the Art Fair, but on the sides of res-
taurants, at the Fire Department and
peeking out of alleyways. For a few
months, Ann Arbor was a museum all
its own. Thanks to the Detroit Insti-
tute of Art's InsidelOut program, high
reproductions of Matisse, Sargent,
Church and other artists featured in
the DIA's galleries decorated the city
streets.
Kerrytown Market & Shops, fit-
tingly, had on show Il Pensionante
del Saraceni's "The Fruit Vendor,"
an early Baroque piece depicting a
woman haggling with a man at his
fruit stand. Installations of paint-
ings like these were made possible
through a partnership between the
Ann Arbor Public Art Commission
and the DIA. The museum ap-
proached the commission during the
fall of 2012 during its search for new
Michigan communities likely to have
an interest in participating. Ann Arbor
agreed to be one of the 13 cities to do
so, and Artemsia Genileschi's "Judith
and Her Maidservant," among six
other reproductions, was installed in
Ann Arbor. City residents were also
given free admission to the museum
during a "community weekend," so
they could see the original pieces.
See PUBLIC ART, Page 4B

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