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January 18, 2013 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 2013-01-18

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2 - Friday, January 18, 2013

The Michigan Daily - michigandaily.cam

2 - Friday, January 18, 2013 The Michigan Daily - michigandailycom

MONDAY:
This Week in History
LEFT, Students discuss
their personal experiences
at Michigan and how it has
affected them on Thursday at
the.This Is My Michigan event
in North Quad. (MCKENZIE
BEREZIN/Daily)
TOP RIGHT Ann Arbor Fire
Chief Chuck Hubbard speaks
with reporters at the scene
of the Packard Street fire
Sunday evening. (TERRA
MOLENGRAFF/Daily)
BOTTOM RIGHT LSA fresh-
man Cristina Shoffner analyzes
sand and leaves for the Univer-
sity's Biological Station. (PAUL
SHERMAN/Daily)

TUESDAY:
Professor Profiles

420 Maynard St.
Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1327
www.michigandaily.com
ANDREWWEINER RACHEL GREINETZ
Editor in Chief Business Manager '
734-418-4115 ext. 1252 734-418-4005 ext. 1241
anweiner@michigandaily.com rmgrein@michigandaily.com

Newsom
734-418-4115 opt.3
Corrections
corrections@michigandaily.com
Arts Section
arts@michigandaily.com
Sports Section
sports@michigandaily.com
Display Sales
display@michigandaily.com
Online Sales
onlineads@michigandaily.com
EDITORIAL STAFF
Matthew Slovin ManagingEditor

News Tips
news@michigandaity.com
Letters to the Editor
tothedaily@michigandaily.com
Editorial Page
opinion@michigandaily.com
Photography Section
photo@michigandaily.com
Classified Sales
classified@michigandaily.com
Finance
finance@michigandaily.com
mjslovin@nichigandaity.com

4

CRIME NOTES

CAMPUS EVENTS & NOTES

Backing-up
troubles
WHERE: 1700 Duffield
WHEN: Wednesday around
9:00 a.m.
WHAT: A Univesrsity
service vehicle backed
into a parked vehicle,
University Police reported.
The incident resulted in no
injuries or damages.
Fair warning
WHERE: 401 Washtenaw
WHEN: Wednesday around
8:45 p.m.
WHAT: A person of interest
in a larceny earlier this
week was escorted out of
the CCRB, University Police
reported. He was given a
trespass warning and told
not to return.

No key, no
problem
WHERE: 551 State
WHEN: Wednesday
between 12:20 p.m. and
2:00 p.m.
WHAT: A locked bicycle
was stolen from a bike rack,
University Police reported.
There are no suspects.
Vive le pot
WHERE: Mary Markley
Residence Hall
WHEN: Wednesday around
10:50 p.m.
WHAT: A student was
arrested for suspected
posession of marijuana. The
student was processed and
released pending warrant
authorization.

Chinese drama
WHAT: There will be
a series of screenings of
works by Cao Yu, a Chinese
dramatist, based on the
dificulties faced by Chinese
intellectuals.
WHO: Confucius Institute
at the University of
Michigan
WHEN: Today at 8:00 a.m.
WHERE: North Campus
Research Complex
MLK
colloquium
WHAT: Linguist Anne
Charity Hudley will give a
lecture in honor of Martin
Luther King, Jr.'s life. This
event will be one of many
events throughout the
weekend.
WHO: The University
Record
WHEN: Today at 4:00 p.m.
WHERE: West Hall Room
340

South Asian
conference
WHAT: Day one of a con-
ference on South Asian
awareness will be held
today. It is the largest South
Asian undergraduate con-
ference in the nation.
WHO: The University
Record
WHEN: Today at 5:00 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan League
Poster sale
WHAT: The start-of-
semester poster sale is back.
Most posters are between
$7 and $9.
WHO: Center for Campus
Involvement
WHEN: Today from
10:00a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
WHERE: Michigan Union
0 Please report any
error in the Daily to
corrections@michi-
gandaily.com.

T HR EE T H ING Y-
A 76-year-old man was
severely beaten Wed.
night after trying to wake
up a sleeping child on a train.
He was reportedly knocked
unconscious on the New York
subway train by another man
who was reportedly with the
child.
The Michigan basket-
ball team registered an
important victory on
the road Thursday in Min-
nesota, 83-75. Junior forward
Tim Hardaway Jr. led the
Wolverines with 21 points,
including four 3-pointers,
and missed only one shot.
Notre Dame linebacker
Manti Te'o's girlfriend,
who he said died
September of last year, is
reportedly not a real person.
Lennay Kekua and her
story's veracity were not
corroborated by background
checks.

Adam Rubenfire ManagingNews Editor arube@michigandaily.com
SENIOR NEWS EDITORS: Alicia Adamczyk, Katie Burke, Austen Hufford, Peter Shahin,
K.C. Wassman'.
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITORS: Molly Block, Jennifer Callas, Aaron Guggenheim, Sam
Gringlas, Danielle Stoppelmann,Steve Zoski
Melanie Kruvelis and opinioneditors@michigandaily.com
Adrienne Roberts Editorial PagetEditors
SENIOR EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS: Jesse Klein, Sarah Skasuba, Derek Wolfe
ASSISTANT EDITORIAL PAGE EDITORS:SharikBashir, Daniel Wang
Everett Cook and
Zach Helfand ManagingSports Editorssportseditors@michigandaily.com
SENIOR SPORTS EDITORS: Steven Braid, Michael Laurila, Stephen Nesbitt; Colleen
Thomas,LizVukelich,DanielWasserman
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITORS: Daniel Feldman, Greg Garno, Rajat Khare, Liz Nagle,
Kayla Upadhyaya ManagingArtsEditor kaylau@michigandaily.com
SENIOR ARTS EDITORS: Elliot Alpern, Brianne JohnsonJohn Lynch,Anna Sadovskaya
ASSISTANT ARTS EDITORS: Sean Czarnecki, Carlina Duan, Max Radin, Akshay Seth,
Katie Steen, Steven Tweedie
Adam Glanzmanand
Terra Molengraff ManagingPhoto Editors photo@michigandaily.com
SENIOR PHOTO EDITORS: TeresaMathew, Todd Needle
ASSISTANTPHOTOEDITORS:KatherinePekala,PaulSherman,Adam Schnitzer
Kristen Cleghorn and
Nick Cruz ManagingDesign Editors design@michigandaily.com
Haley Goldberg Magazine Editor statement@michigandaily.com
DEPUTY MAGAZINE EDITOR: Paige Pearcy
Josephine Adams and
Tom McBrien copychiefs copydesk@michigandaily.com
SENIORCOPYEDITORS:JennieColeman,KellyMcLauglin
BUSINESS STAFF
Ashley Karadsheh AssociateBusinessManager
SeanJackson sales Manager
SophieGreenbaum ProductionManager
Meryl Hulteng National Account Manager
Connor Byrd Finance Manager
Qtly VO Circulation Manage
The Michigan Daily (IsSN 0745-96) is published Monday through Friday during the fall and
winter terms by students at the universityof Michigan. One copy is availablefree of charge
to all readers. Additional copies may be picked upat the Daily's office for $2.subscriptions for
faIl term, starting in september, via U.S.mail are $110. Winter term( tanuarythrough Apriltis
$115, yearlong (september through Aprilis $195.University affiliates are subiet to a reduced
subsvriptionrate t-campussubscriptionsforfalItermare $35.Subsiponsmustbprepaid.
TheMivhigan Daily isanmemberof ThessocviatedlPressandiThessocatedCllegate ress.

0

MORE ONLINE Love Crime Notes?
Get moreonline at michigandaily.com/blogs/The Wire

13B&FUniversity researchers look "
at pollutants in Great Lakes

Collaborative
initiative maps
ecosystem stresses
By RACHEL PREMACK
Daily NewsaReporter
Over Winter Break, Univer-
sity researchers have teamed up
with international colleagues"
in a recently released study to
analyze the most pressingissues
that endanger the Great Lakes.
The University-centered
Great Lakes Environmental
Assessment and Mapping proj-
ect identified mercury contami-
nation, changing water levels,
four invasive species -and 28
other environmental stressors
disruptive to the Great Lakes.
GLEAM presented these
findings on a website launched
in December that features
interactive maps of the Great
Lakes. The findings are also
published in the Jan. 2 Proceed-
ings of the National Academy of
Sciences journal.
The maps exhibit how each
individual stressor affects an
area in the Great Lakes, and a
general map shows the total
impact of the stressors. The
stress index of the latter map
indicates that Lake Ontario is
the most affected, followed by
Lakes Erie, Michigan, Huron
and Superior. Other maps illus-
trate the benefits that the lakes
provide humans, such as beach-
es and commercial fishing.
J. David Allan, a professor in
the School of Natural Resources
and Environment and one of
four leaders of GLEAM, said the
ongoing project is intended to

"develop the right kinds of infor-
mationto assist restoration."
The project - now tied to the
three-month-old University of
Michigan Water Center - was
funded by the Fred A. and Barbara
M. ErbFamilyFoundation, agroup
that supports initiatives to better
the Great Lakes community.
Adrienne Marino, a research
specialist at the Water Center,
- said she assisted in the collection
of data provided by researchers
and resource management agen-
cies hailing from the Great Lakes
region. The team compiled data
by analyzing, processing and
mapping published research and
weighing the importance of each
stressor.
"Applying stressor weightings
and completing other transforma-
tions and calculations were neces-
sary to put the individual maps on
a consistent scale and to develop
the cumulative map," Marino said.
Gregory Boyer, chair of chemis-
try at the State University of New
York's College of Environmental
Science and Forestry, was one of
the 15 working group members. .
Boyer noted that the most
destruction has occurred in shal-
low waters. In deeper offshore
waters, Boyer said, water sepa-
rates into warmer top waters and
cooler deep waters. Between these
two layers is a thermocline, an
area where dramatic temperature
change occurs.
Boyer said this stratification is
necessary to prevent pollutants
from affecting humans and to
ensure that harmful algal blooms
cannot reach sunlight that would
support its growth, a process that
would lead to other environmen-
tal complications.
"When you're talking about a

chemical pollutant ... offshore, it
absorbs through a particle, goes
through the thermocline and is
effectively removed from human
contact," Boyersaid.
Boyer said he worries that shal-
lowwaterswere most affected.
"This is especially troublesome
because these are the waters that
humans use more, like in beach-
es," Boyer said. "Nearshore often
sees more stress than the off-
shore waters."
Allan said the GLEAM project
has already provided data to the
Nature Conservancy, the U.S. Fish
and Wildlife Service and other
environmental groups. But, he
said, additional work is still nec-
essary. For example, the cumula-
tive stress index used by the maps,
which totals up each stressor and
its weighted importance, doesn't
fully convey environmental prob-
lems.
"Increasingly in the field of
understanding environmental
stressors affecting ecosystems, we
realized that stressors are interac-
tive," Allan said. "Invasive species
one and invasive species two might
be a double whammy that's bigger
than their sum."
In the meantime, Sigrid Smith,
a research associate of the School
of Natural Resources and; Envi-
ronment who also led GLEAM,
said the Great Lakes might never
reach hypothetical . "normal"
environmental conditions. For
that reason, targeted goals may
need rethinking.
"I think of the target of resto-
ration as promoting ecosystem
health, so that the native popula-
tions of plants, animals and other
organisms are as healthy as pos-
sible and produce as much human
benefit as possible."

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